Man Utd ramp up Smalling fee to £25m with Spurs, Arsenal and Everton all keen

first_imgMANCHESTER UNITED have reportedly ramped up their transfer fee of Chris Smalling to £25m with Spurs, Arsenal and Everton all keen on the defender.Metro claim that Roma, who are looking to turn the England star’s loan into a permanent deal this summer, are said to be shocked by the Red Devils’ valuation.1 Chris Smalling has impressed during his time on loan at RomaCredit: Getty Images – GettyOle Gunnar Solskjaer’s side are keen to avoid losing another centre-back on the cheap after recouping just £6m for Jonny Evans’ departure in 2015.The Northern Irishman has starred for Leicester this season, and has also attracted £35m interest from Arsenal and Manchester City in recent years.MAN UTD NEWS LIVE: Follow for the latest United newsRoma meanwhile had hoped to strike a deal for Smalling for less than £20m, yet United are mindful of other clubs keeping tabs on him.The 30-year-old is loving life in the Italian capital and has made no secret of his desire to end his time at Old Trafford after nine years at the club.However, the Fulham defender has also been offered a route back into English football with both Spurs and Everton keen on a move.Arsenal had been listed as another possible destination for Smalling, who has revived his career in Serie A.The star  – dubbed ‘Smalldini’ after his fine form – has even been offered a chance at an England recall by Gareth Southgate.The Three Lions boss suggested that Smalling’s limitations in playing out from the back meant he was not suited to his blueprint back in 2017.But the England boss now admits he was “unfair” on Smalling and paved the way for a potential way back into the fold.Southgate said: “I’ve never ruled anybody out. I think that would be wrong.“I think I said I probably regretted the way the message came across if, by praising others for certain attributes, there was criticism for Chris. It was my fault and it was unfair on him.”Southgate and his assistant Steve Holland flew out to Italy to watch Smalling in action before Christmas.The England boss added: “I spoke to him when I left him out the squad and explained what I explained to everybody.Most Read in FootballTHROUGH ITRobbie Keane reveals Claudine’s father was ’50-50′ in coronavirus battleTOP SELLERGavin Whelan has gone from League of Ireland to David Beckham’s InstagramPicturedAN EYEFULMeet Playboy model and football agent Anamaria Prodan bidding to buy her own clubI SAW ROORodallega saw Rooney ‘drinking like madman’ & Gerrard ‘on bar dancing shirtless’ExclusiveRIYAD RAIDMan City’s Riyad Mahrez has three luxury watches stolen in £500,000 raidNEXT STEPJonny Hayes set to move to English Championship having been let go by CelticMAKE YOUR DEBUT Bet £5 get £20 in free bets for new customers at Ladbrokes“Of course because of the way it came out, there was little point – I wasn’t going to say anything that hadn’t already been said.“But I think he’s done well in Italy. He’s playing at another big club.“He was obviously playing at a big club before. We’re watching everybody because we’ve got to make sure we make the right decision.”Man United ace Chris Smalling ‘in talks with Tottenham and Everton over transfer’ as Woodward demands £16.5mlast_img read more

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It’s Politics: Proposed bill would ban trans fats from restaurants, bakeries

first_imgShe said banning oils containing trans fats could lead to greater use of saturated fats. But Stephen Joseph, a Tiburon attorney who was a consultant to New York City in developing its trans fat ban, disagreed that there would be supply problems. He said the bill would trigger increased production of oils that are free of trans fats. He cited examples of canola oil and other trans-fat-free oils that are also low in saturated fats. But he said that even if the bill triggered more use of saturated fats in place of trans fats, that would be an improvement. “Trans fat is so much worse than saturated fat,” he said. “If it was a one-to-one swap, you’re better off with saturated fat. Saturated fat doesn’t reduce your good cholesterol.” Mendoza’s bill carries violations could result in fines of $25 to $1,000. Food items sold in their manufacturers’ sealed packaging would be exempt. AB 97 next goes to the Assembly Appropriations Committee, probably in late spring. PRIMARY TALK: Bob Jimenez, communications director for state Sen. Ron Calderon, D-Montebello, will speak at the 7 p.m. Monday meeting of the Robert F. Kennedy Democratic Club. The club meets at Sizzler Restaurant, 15252 E. Rosecrans Ave., La Mirada. Jimenez is expected to speak about SB 113, Calderon’s bill that would move the presidential primary from June to February. Mail items for It’s Politics to the Whittier Daily News, P.O. Box 581, Whittier, CA 90608; fax (562) 698-0450; phone (562) 698-0955; e-mail: [email protected] 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Editor’s note: It’s Politics reports Saturdays on the ins and outs of Whittier-area politics and city government. Assemblyman Tony Mendoza’s bill, AB 97, which would ban the use of trans fats from restaurants and bakeries, has taken its first step toward becoming law. But in order to get the 11-5 vote from the Assembly Health Committee this week, Mendoza, D-Norwalk, agreed to give restaurants and bakeries another year to implement the change. Instead of a June 30, 2008, deadline for restaurants and June 30, 2009, date for bakeries to remove trans fats, Mendoza agreed to 2009 and 2010, respectively. Mendoza called trans fats “the leading cause of heart disease and diabetes.” “Trans fats have absolutely no nutritional value,” he said. “In fact, trans fats increase bad cholesterol and decrease good cholesterol. They’re worse than saturated fat.” Trans fats occur naturally in small amounts in meat and dairy products. Most trans fats that are consumed are created when vegetable oil is treated with hydrogen to create baked and fried goods with a longer shelf life. Representatives of the California Restaurant Association and Grocery Manufacturers Association contend the bill would lead to shortages of oils free of trans fats and force owners of small restaurants to pay higher prices for cooking oil. “We see larger chains being able to move away from trans fat,” said Lara Dunbar, senior vice president of government affairs for the restaurant association. “Small mom-and-pop restaurants cannot do this. They cannot afford to buy in bulk oils that will not change the taste of their food.” last_img read more

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