New chief of staff

first_imgPatti Bellinger has been named chief of staff and strategic adviser to Harvard President Larry Bacow, effective Sept. 1. A 1983 graduate of Harvard College, Bellinger most recently was an adjunct lecturer and senior fellow at Harvard Kennedy School, where she was previously executive director of the Center for Public Leadership. Bellinger also has served as executive director of executive education at Harvard Business School.“Patti brings tremendous experience and a distinguished background to the chief of staff role,” said Bacow. “She has been a highly effective leader in both the corporate and nonprofit world. I enjoyed working with her at the Center for Public Leadership and am delighted to welcome Patti to our team, and I am confident we will benefit greatly from her wisdom, insight, and thoughtful, strategic approach.”,Bellinger, above, led the Center for Public Leadership from 2013–2017, a period of tremendous growth and expansion, more than doubling the number of student fellowships, quadrupling the reach of the leadership development portfolio, and playing a pivotal role in building the center’s endowment. As chief of staff, Bellinger will help advance the president’s University-wide agenda, assisting on major initiatives. She also will oversee the administrative and operational activities of the Office of the President.“It is an honor to join President Bacow’s team and to support his vision for Harvard,” said Bellinger. “This University has been in my life for almost 40 years, since I first arrived as a freshman in 1979. I’m grateful for this new opportunity to give back to an institution that has been a formative influence in my life.”Bellinger led the Center for Public Leadership from 2013–2017, a period of tremendous growth and expansion, more than doubling the number of student fellowships, quadrupling the reach of the leadership development portfolio, and playing a pivotal role in building the center’s endowment. As adjunct lecturer, she has taught “The Art of Leading in a Diverse World: Skills, Insights, and Best Practices,” while contributing to the Kennedy School’s executive education program.Bellinger also has held senior leadership roles in the private sector and has served on the boards of public companies and nonprofit organizations spanning various countries and disciplines, including the pharmaceutical industry, theater, the energy sector, global business, and startups.last_img read more

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Starting over step by step

first_imgAmid the misery and destruction brought by Hurricanes Katrina and then Rita, with so many lives shattered and families displaced, the question I’ve heard many news commentators ask is a natural one: After you’ve lost everything, how do you start again? From the enduring lessons that my late parents taught me, I would say it is with patience and perseverance, with faith and courage, and by taking one step at a time. Let me make it clear that I don’t pretend to know what Katrina and Rita survivors have gone and are going through. Hurricane Frances and Jeanne did hit my hometown of Vero Beach, Fla., last year, but damage to our home was minor. My personal “hurricane” was political – when I was a teen-ager living with my parents, we lost everything we had in our native Cuba to seek a life of freedom in the United States. The older I get, the more deeply I realize the immense sacrifice my parents made in leaving and making sure I did not grow up under a Communist dictatorship. In their mid-40s, with a working but far from perfect knowledge of English, they left behind the life they knew and the new middle-class home they had worked so hard to afford. We arrived in this country in 1960 with literally the clothes on our backs and a total of $300 in cash, plus the promise of a job for my father with the oil company Texaco in Kansas City, Mo. Our story is hardly unique, of course. Millions of refugees from Cuba and other countries have done the same, including my wife’s late parents (we did not know each other at the time). Despite our financial struggles, this was a time we treasure because it brought the families closer together and taught us life lessons that still serve us well. Among the things we learned to do: -Recognize and accept reality, and go from there. Cherishing memories is good, even therapeutic. Dwelling in the past is not, unless it is to learn from mistakes. On that score, I still get plenty of e-mails from readers who lost a big chunk of their retirement savings to the 2000-2002 bear market. Rather than try to “get even” by clinging to the same risky investments that did them in, they need to come up with an appropriate and well-diversified asset allocation based on what they have now, not what they had then. -Better ourselves. Every day brings an opportunity to learn something new and make yourself more marketable. It can be done, a little at a time. For me, learning English was a painful necessity at age 16, and I did it partly by getting through an article in Reader’s Digest each evening, English-Spanish dictionary in hand. This nightly exercise, a kind of self-imposed homework, nurtured my love of language. Today, after nearly 40 years as a professional writer, I still go to the dictionary most days (English only this time) looking for nuances in meaning and searching for the right word. -Build on small goals. For my parents, saving for months to afford badly needed new mattresses was a highlight of our first year in the United States. For me, it was saving (after contributing my share to the family expenses) from my $1-an-hour job at the high school cafeteria to buy an Orquesta Aragon Cuban cha-cha-cha long-playing album. (I still have that music, now on compact disc.) Saving for those two purchases taught me more about financial discipline than anything else. Over time, the goals became more ambitious – the first starter home for my wife, Georgina, and me in 1978, for example; a larger home in 1985; retirement from full-time at work in 2000; and a new beachside home in Vero Beach in 2001. But the method and the discipline – set a goal and a deadline for accomplishing it, put a price tag on it and set money aside regularly to pay for it – never changed. -Share with others less fortunate, and grow. As a teen-ager in Kansas City, on a frightfully cold and windy Christmas Eve, I walked with our parish priest, knocking on doors and giving out toys to needy children from Cuban refugee families who had arrived after we did. My fingers and feet numb, I wanted to go back to the church where it was warm; the priest kept saying “one more,” over again. “One more” became at least 20 more stops. I experienced that night the joy of giving – and learned that the seemingly most arduous and difficult task can always be done, “one more” thing at a time. Humberto Cruz offers personal finance advice. Write him at [email protected] 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Miss Africa 2016 calls on young people to build a better continent

first_img6 May 2016Rebecca Asamoah, the first Miss Africa Continent, has high hopes for the continent. She believes cooperation between her and the other contestants will help create a united Africa. One that can deliver a better life for all who call it home. Ghanaian Rebecca Asamoah is Miss Africa Continent 2016. Her prize was a grant to study business management at Monash University in Johannesburg. (Image: Facebook)Ghanaian Asamoah was crowned on Saturday 30 April in Johannesburg. Zambian Michelo Malambo was named first princess, and South Africa’s Jemimah Kandemiiri second princess.Asamoah wants each of the contestants to empower youth in their own countries. “There are a lot of things to be fixed in Africa — water, education, environmental issues,” she told the news agency AFP. “My main concern is the empowerment of youths . so we can work hand in hand and put our continent in the best place it should be.”“We are not divided”Asamoah says her aim is to unite the continent. “To say no to xenophobia, and also to alleviate most challenges Africa is facing under health, education, poverty and environment. These are things I am passionate about. I plan to help raise not only the flag of Ghana high, but that of the African continent at large.”The 24-year-old Asamoah told local news channel ANN7 that it was not our differences that mattered. Instead she emphasised that we have a collective responsibility to Africa. “It does not mean we are different people. We are not divided . We are each other’s keeper.”Asamoah said her two princesses would visit projects in Ghana that supported the aged and the combating of diseases such as malaria.“There is a place called Leila and Nabuli camp for the aged, up in the northern part of Ghana. There is this misconception about them, that they are alleged witches. So they have been neglected. No proper food, clothes, footwear and potable water. Under the Miss Ghana foundation we visit them every year to interact with them and also mentor them on personal hygiene before some donations are made to them. This year, by the grace of God, the borehole is under construction to create potable water for them.”The pageantThe Miss Africa Continent pageant is the brainchild of South African film producer Neo Mashishi, who said it was about uplifting young African women. To make the pageant African, the finalists walked barefoot on stage – in their traditional clothes. The swimwear category was dropped; instead, finalists wore a uniform of black T-shirts and shorts.Mashishi told AFP that they did this to go against the norm of Westernised pageants. “The way everything was done was African. We didn’t emulate anything from Miss Universe or Miss World. This is about Africa. We are selling Africa to the world, and we are proud to be African.”According to the Guardian, during the weeks running up to the event, the 12 finalists embarked on a series of pre-pageant activities such as showing off their culinary skills by cooking traditional meals from their home countries.Watch highlights of the pageant:Second princess, South Africa’s Jemimah Kandemiiri, is a law student at the University of Pretoria. She said the pageant taught her that the best gift to yourself is to be you. “With the pressure that comes from the modelling industry and the so called ‘need to be perfect,’ it will consume you.“I learned that we are all from different parts of Africa, very similar in almost everything, but we seldom expose that which makes us authentic. I always say, be you, no-one can do you better than you. When you’re yourself, you will attract things that are like you.”last_img read more

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Reinventing a Passive Solar Design

first_imgFramed walls rather than SIPsEvan’s father built the first duplex from SIPs, but Evan chose to use 2×6 framed walls insulated with wet-blown cellulose and an additional 2 inches of extruded polystyrene insulation (XPS) for a total R-value of 30. The roof is framed with I-joists and insulated with dense-packed fiberglass (R-47).He would have preferred using SIPs, but he chose advanced framing instead because it was less expensive and made more sense for an income-producing building.On south-facing walls, the roof overhang is only 18 inches wide, Evan said, not nearly enough to shade the windows properly during the summer. To compensate, Evan designed a steel louver that he and his brother built and installed at the top of the wall. It provides the correct amount of summer shading to prevent overheating.The concrete slab foundation is insulated with 2 inches of XPS insulation.The all-electric units are heated and cooled with a 28 SEER single-zone ductless minisplit made by LG. Each unit has an exhaust-only Panasonic fan in the bathroom. Evan said the very small volume of the apartments made him comfortable with an exhaust-only ventilation strategy.The units are ready for photovoltaic panels, but when they are deployed depends on the fate of a large elm tree that now shades the western half of the roof, Davis said. The tree, planted in the 1930s, is nearing the end of its expected lifespan.Domestic hot water is provided by conventional water heaters located in the lofts. Monthly utility bills are about $55, most of which goes to hot water. Albuquerque, New Mexico, was an incubator for alternative building technologies when Jon Davis graduated from the University of New Mexico in the early 1970s and started building passive solar adobe houses.Although not an architect, Davis had studied the principles of passive solar design in school, and after graduation embraced superinsulated buildings and, eventually, structural insulated panels (SIPs).His first SIP building was a duplex rental unit at 317 Cornell just a few blocks from the university campus. “Basically he just wanted to pull out all the stops and make it extremely passive solar and do all these things he was learning about,” his son Evan Davis said recently.At the time, the two small apartments, each about 500 square feet, were a real departure from conventional residential design. Not only were SIPs relatively unknown, but the apartments also featured water-filled translucent tubes for added thermal mass, and large sloped windows that gathered energy from the sun.It was this last detail that turned the apartments into solar ovens. “These places were absolutely unbearable in the summer,” Davis said. His father, like a lot of early passive solar designers, hadn’t yet mastered the fine points of solar shading, and it was Evan who as an architecture student himself later designed and built a roof overhang on the building to block the summer sun.After graduation, Evan worked with his father at Sunlight Homes, where they settled into a comfortable collaboration. Then, a few years ago, Jon Davis died.In the aftermath, Evan, now 31, decided to build his mother a four-unit rental to augment her income, and the design he came up with was an updated version of the passive solar duplex that his father had created nearly 40 years earlier. Some similarities and some key differencesThe 1970s duplex and the building Evan completed at the beginning of this year share a couple of important similarities. They both have small footprints, high ceilings, sleeping lofts and, as it turned out, the most important feature of them all: the “Kalwall tubes.”The 10-foot-tall tubes are 18 inches in diameter and filled with water. Standing near a south-facing window, they moderate temperature spikes with high thermal mass. The tubes are fabricated from a type of fiberglass, Evan said, by Kalwall, a Manchester, New Hampshire, based company. They’re pricey, he said, but well worth it.The tubes have proved remarkably durable, requiring only a good cleaning once every five years or so and the addition of a little bleach once in a while to kill off any algae. None of the tubes has failed. Water has a higher mass than the concrete slab floor, or the double layer of 5/8-inch drywall on the building’s party walls, so the tubes provide an essential tempering element in the passive solar units.Beyond that, people just seem to like them. “I was really taken at how easily those two units rented, despite them not really being anything special,” Evan said. “They became known as the apartments with the tubes.”Evan said he now designs buildings all over the United States, and he wishes he had more opportunities to include the Kalwall tubes in the plans. That’s often not the case. “I so rarely get to use things like these water tubes,” he said. “Most of my clients want more traditional-looking homes, unfortunately.”center_img Outlandish becomes the normWhen Jon Davis originally built the duplex, the design and materials both were highly unusual. Passive solar building hasn’t become mainstream in the same way the two-story suburban Colonial seems to have become. But all of the attention heaped on green building, Passivhaus construction, and advanced building standards such as LEED certainly have made home buyers more aware of new possibilities.“That’s one thing that worries me about my business,” Evan said. “It used to be that we were crazy. What we did was crazy back in the early ’80s and even part of the ’90s. It was very unheard of and the people who found us were the fringe people, but now it’s becoming more and more common. Slowly, I’m starting to see that I do is no longer really a niche.“Maybe that’s for the better.”The new four-unit building is creating a buzz in the neighborhood, Evan said, thanks in part to the Kalwall tubes visible in the front windows that still intrigue passersby.Even his mother and brother are on the bandwagon. Each has taken one of the apartments in the building.“My mom ended up wanting to live in one,” Evan said. “She wasn’t anticipating that. She said, ‘I can’t live in something that small,’ and then she saw it and said, ‘I can totally do this.’”last_img read more

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5 Tips for Editing a Fast-Paced Video

first_imgFramingIf you are creating a fast-paced edit, you absolutely must consider what the audience is seeing during each shot. For instance, if the subject of the shot is on the bottom right side of the frame, it’s probably a bad idea to quickly cut to somebody else at the top left corner of the frame. If you do decide (or simply don’t have enough footage) to include this cut, make sure you give the audience enough time to comprehend what they’re seeing before cutting away. An excellent example of crucial framing in a rapidly cut scene comes from 2015’s Mad Max: Fury Road. Rapid-cut edits have their place in certain projects. Here are a few things to consider before undertaking one of your own.Top image via Shutterstock.One of the most difficult aspects of editing and video production is knowing exactly how your edit will look when it’s all said and done. Creating engaging content is sometimes left up to the editor, who must make the right cuts while guiding the audience through the experience. Here are a few ways you can create a fast-paced, entertaining video while keeping your audience’s attention. Match ColorsThis might seem obvious, but consider cutting from dark rooms to light rooms and the amount of time our eyes need to adjust accordingly. As with framing, the audience needs enough time to recognize the change in scenery and understand what’s happening before you can cut to the next shot. You must also consider the colors and exposure of contrasting shots.Cut to the BeatIf your goal is to maintain a fast, fun pace, it’s important to note that cutting to the beat of a song is an excellent way to maintain rhythm and style. Many of the biggest vloggers and creators on YouTube employ this technique at some point due to its absolute ability to entertain while maintaining the illusion of professionalism. PremiumBeat offers songs broken down into Beats Per Minute, and they come in 15-, 30-, and 60- second versions.Match MovementOne technique that might not seem as obvious is to match objects’ movements between cuts by moving in the same direction. As you can see in the example above, liquid flowing from one side of the screen to the other and cutting to a similar action — whether it’s people drinking or rain falling — will help the video flow more smoothly. This might be difficult if you don’t have the right footage, but if you need to cut to a three-second clip of a resembling motion or shot, check out Shutterstock’s footage library.Match Camera MovementMatching action has been an editing staple for decades; however, it’s also worth noting that matching camera movements is an excellent way to achieve a consistent, sweeping feeling throughout your video. This similarity in movement will help the audience register the image if you’re cutting quickly.Know any other helpful editing tips for quick cuts? Let us know in the comments.last_img read more

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9 months agoBournemouth, Southampton chasing Brentford defender Chris Mepham

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Bournemouth, Southampton chasing Brentford defender Chris Mephamby Paul Vegas9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveBournemouth and Southampton are chasing Brentford defender Chris Mepham.The Sun says Bournemouth are set to bid £15m for Mepham as they look to land the young defender ahead of Southampton.Bournemouth boss Eddie Howe wants a centre-back to complete his January spending after landing Dominic Solanke and Nathaniel Clyne early in the window.Brentford defender Mepham is a long-term target and Howe failed with a £10million summer bid for the 21-year-old Wales international.But he will move for him again and launch a £15million raid to get him ahead of south-coast rivals Southampton, who are also interested in Bees forward Ollie Watkins. last_img read more

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