5 things Sharks fans need to know about new guy Erik Karlsson

first_imgErik Karlsson comes across as a friendly sort who would personally introduce himself to every Sharks fan in the South Bay. Unfortunately nobody has that kind of time. But we’re happy to provide the next best thing: 5 things you need to know about the Sharks’ biggest offseason acquisition.1. He skates with an artificial tendon in his left foot, inserted during a 2017 surgery in which doctors also removed part of his left ankle bone. “It feels like I have a leather piece in my one ankle,” he …last_img read more

Continue reading

Jimmy Durante Boulevard reopens just ahead of San Diego County Fair

first_img 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsDEL MAR (KUSI) – Jimmy Durante Boulevard reopened Wednesday night in time for the San Diego County Fair.The barrier is up and the “road closed” signs have been taken away. Crews have been cleaning up and making repairs ever since a bluff collapsed during Easter weekend.The reopening comes just in time for the San Diego County Fair which opens on Friday. Jimmy Durante Boulevard reopens just ahead of San Diego County Fair Posted: May 29, 2019 KUSI Newsroom, KUSI Newsroom May 29, 2019 Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

Continue reading

San Antonio Fosters Cybersecurity Cluster

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR San Antonio is cultivating the largest military and civilian federal cybersecurity hub outside the Washington metro region, marked by growth in the number of companies serving the market and highly-rated university programs, according to the San Antonio Economic Development Foundation.The military components of the city’s cybersecurity cluster are anchored by the 24th and 25th Air Force at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, and the National Security Agency Texas. The 24th Air Force safeguards key components of DOD’s information networks and employs more than 1,300 people. U.S. Cyber Command officials last year said up to 1,000 additional personnel will be coming to San Antonio in the next three years to support the department’s cybersecurity mission.“The strength of San Antonio’s cybersecurity industry is evident in the community’s commitment to grow and foster a sector for which it is ideally suited,” said John Dickson, principal at the San Antonio-based Denim Group. “Locally based companies are continuing to grow at a rate of 30 percent per year and innovative technologies are the result,” Dickson said.The city’s cybersecurity cluster is supported by more than 200 companies, including all major defense contractors and 100 local cybersecurity firms. San Antonio’s established military operations, along with academic programs at area universities, and talent and business incubators are helping the cybersecurity industry flourish in San Antonio.  “San Antonio is a breeding ground for cybersecurity resources, a place where technologies are being developed and enhanced to defend the nation, and a work force is being built to support the cybersecurity technology industry — the fastest growing area of advanced technology investment in the world,” said Mario Hernandez, president of the foundation.last_img read more

Continue reading

Fractal wire patterns enhance stretchability of electronic devices

first_img The researchers, Jonathan A. Fan, et al., from institutions in the US, China, Korea, and Singapore, have published a paper on the benefits of fractal wire patterns for stretchable electronics in a recent issue of Nature Communications.In general, a main challenge in designing stretchable electronics is maintaining good electronic functionality while enabling stretching of up to twice the normal device size. Some of the most successful approaches to achieving both of these goals involve combining two separate components: a hard component that provides high conductivity and a soft component that provides mechanical stretchability. The dual-component nature of these devices raises the question of how hard and soft materials can be ideally integrated.The results of the new study show that fractal patterns offer a promising approach to hard-soft materials integration, and suggest that fractal patterns can influence the mechanical properties of 2D materials. In the new devices, the hard metal wires are engineered into fractal designs and then bonded to soft elastomers.”We have established an approach, with general utility, for configuring hard materials with soft ones, in ways that have immediate relevance in all areas of stretchable electronics,” coauthor John Rogers, Professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, told Phys.org. “The resulting properties also provide advanced capabilities in stretchable/conformal devices and sensors, not only electronic, but photonic, optoelectronic and photovoltaic as well.” (Phys.org) —Fractals—patterns defined by their scale-invariance that makes them look the same on large scales as they do on small scales—are found in nature everywhere from snowflakes to broccoli to the beating of the heart. In a new study, researchers have demonstrated that metal wires patterned in various fractal motifs, when integrated into elastic materials, enable highly stretchable electronic devices. The fractal wire patterns could lead to a variety of new devices, such as biomedical sensors that can be attached to the skin and that have unique properties such as invisibility under magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Explore further Citation: Fractal wire patterns enhance stretchability of electronic devices (2014, February 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-02-fractal-wire-patterns-stretchability-electronic.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. This control provided by fractal patterns could allow researchers to tailor stretchable electronics devices for different applications, depending on the type of stretching required. One potential application is “epidermal electronics,” or skin-mounted sensors and actuators. A common example is electrodes, which measure electrophysiological processes in the brain, heart and muscle. To optimize the level of connectivity, the electrodes must conform to the skin, which has a stretchability of up to 20%. The researchers found that electrodes made with the Greek cross fractal pattern offer a high connectivity, stretchability, and robustness that enables them to compare favorably to conventional gel-based electrodes.Fractal patterns could also have applications for radio-frequency devices, which could enable electrodes that are compatible with MRI scans. The researchers performed MRI experiments comparing electrodes made from three types of fractal patterns, two variants of serpentine (non-fractal) patterns, a pattern consisting of superimposed vertical and horizontal lines, and no pattern. While the serpentine patterns and unpatterned samples contained shadows that distorted the images, the fractal samples showed no shadows or distortion. The researchers attribute this difference to the highly interconnected closed loops of metal in the serpentine patterns; in contrast, the fractals do not contain closed loops, so they do not couple to RF radiation and are therefore invisible under MRI. The results suggest that fractal patterns offer a promising route to future MRI-compatible skin-mounted or implanted electrodes and other electronic devices.In the future, the researchers plan to investigate further applications of fractals in electronics.”We are now exploiting these same ideas to move from electrodes and test structures of silicon, to active materials for stretchable LEDs and solar cells, with a next goal of producing full functional systems in these types of layouts,” Rogers said. (a) Fractal-inspired patterns for hard-soft materials integration, with (b) FEM images and (c) MicroXCT images. Credit: Fan, et al. ©2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited (Top) Image of metal wires with the Peano fractal pattern, with an overall geometry that spells out the characters in ‘ILLINOIS’, mounted on skin. Optical (lower left) and scanning electron (lower right) microscopy images of Peano-based wires on skin and a skin-replica (colorized metal wires), respectively, show how the wires conform to the substrate. Credit: Fan, et al. ©2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited More information: Jonathan A. Fan. “Fractal design concepts for stretchable electronics.” Nature Communications. DOI: 10.1038/ncomms4266 Journal information: Nature Communications Fractal plumage indicates bird fitness In their experiments, the researchers investigated several different fractal patterns, including Peano, Greek cross, Vicsek, and others. They found that these fractal patterns offer key advantages over other patterns, such as periodic loops and serpentine shapes investigated in previous studies. With the Peano pattern, for example, the researchers showed that modifying the orientation of the pattern enhances the material’s elastic strain in one or more selected directions, and allows the pattern to support different types of deformations. Previously explored wire patterns do not offer the ability to control the strain and deformation in these ways. © 2014 Phys.org. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Continue reading