RUGBY: DONEGAL GIRLS NORA AND LARISSA HELP IRELAND TO 6 NATIONS VICTORY

first_imgIRELAND completed the double over Wales in the 6 Nations this weekend – after the national women’s team defeated the Welsh, following the men’s 30-22 victory in Cardiff.And two Donegal women played their part in their 12-10 victory.Ballybofey woman Lariss Muldoon started the match, with Nora Stapleton from Fahan on the replacements bench. A 75th-minute try from Ireland Women’s hooker Gillian Bourke broke Welsh hearts in the last of the RBS 6 Nations matches this weekend as they secured a 12-10 win.Wales led with ten minutes left on the clock but they succumbed to heavy Irish pressure to go down at the death at Aberavon’s Port Talbot Athletic Ground.It took 22 minutes for the deadlock to be broken and it was Irish lock Sophie Spence who went over in the corner for the first try of the game. Niamh Briggs slotted the conversion from way out on the touchline to give the visitors a 0-7 lead.Just before the half-time whistle, Wales got themselves back into the game courtesy of a Rosie Fletcher try after some superb work from the pack. The Welsh were patient in their build-up and even when the chance to score seemed to have been lost, Fletcher found her way through the Ireland defence to score. A conversion from Elinor Snowsill levelled it at the break, 7-7. It was all Wales at the start of the second half but the home side struggled to convert pressure into points. Two surges over the try-line were judged to have been knocked on by the referee, and the mistakes turned out to be costly.Wales came close to another score 15 minutes from time when winger Caryl James nearly touched down, only for Ireland’s Alison Miller to hack the ball away in the nick of time.With 11 minutes left, replacement Laura Prosser edged Wales in front with a penalty. With Ireland reduced to 14 all Wales had to do was see the game out.But Ireland refused to lie down and heaped pressure on the Welsh defence. Eventually the breakthrough came with Bourke going over in the corner to win the game. RUGBY: DONEGAL GIRLS NORA AND LARISSA HELP IRELAND TO 6 NATIONS VICTORY was last modified: February 3rd, 2013 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:BallybofeyFahanRUGBY: DONEGAL GIRLS NORA AND LARISSA HELP IRELAND TO 6 NATIONS VICTORYlast_img read more

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Warriors’ top draft pick will provide options in rebuild

first_imgCHICAGO — Despite having the worst record in the NBA, the 4-19 Warriors know, a year from now, their outlook will be very different.With a healthy Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson expected to join Draymond Green, D’Angelo Russell and surprise building block Eric Paschall, the Warriors will have two tools with which to supplement a championship-level core.The Warriors, having won only two of their last 16 games, are on track to land a top pick in June’s draft, when they’ll be in position to …last_img read more

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Metaphors of Evolution

first_imgIf Will Rogers never met a man he didn’t like, science never metaphor it didn’t force.  The history of science is replete with examples of metaphors not only trying to explain phenomena, but actually driving scientific research.  Many times thoughtless metaphors have said more about current social values than science.    So argued Mary Midgley, a “a freelance philosopher, specialising in moral philosophy,” in an article on New Scientist:The trouble with metaphors is that they don’t just mirror scientific beliefs, they also shape them.  Our imagery is never just surface paint, it expresses, advertises and strengthens our preferred interpretations.  It also usually carries unconscious bias from the age we live in – and this can be tricky to ditch no matter how faulty, unless we ask ourselves how and why things go wrong, and start to talk publicly about how we should understand metaphor.The article was developed from her book, The Solitary Self.  But did her conclusion learn the lessons of history?  Here is a short list of metaphors she found in science over the centuries:Nature, the clock:  Scientists in Newton’s day envisioned the world as a mechanical clock wound up by God.Nature, the billiard game:  Early atomists interpreted everything as colliding billiard-ball atoms.  Rousseau applied this to “social atomism.”Nature, the war of all against all:  Thomas Hobbes’ metaphor of a war of individuals “accidentally launched a wider revolt against the notion of citizenship,” Midgley said.  “The slogan made it possible to argue later that there is no such thing as society, that we owe one another nothing.”Nature, the capitalist:  Laissez-faire capitalism, Midgley argued, is an application of atomism to economics.Nature, the competitor:  Spencer and Darwin used the metaphor of competition to interpret nature, although Midgley asserts that “Charles Darwin actually hated much of it, flatly rejecting the crude, direct application of natural selection to social policies.”  Whether or not his emotions against competition were derived from science or from his cultural milieu is another question.Nature as selfish genes:  “Evolution has been the most glaring example of the thoughtless use of metaphor over the past 30 years, with the selfish/war metaphors dominating and defining the landscape so completely it becomes hard to admit there are other ways of conceiving it,” Midgley complained.Nature as self-organization:  D’Arcy Thompson, Brian Goodwin, Steven Rose and Simon Conway Morris have worked on the metaphor of unfolding organic forms, “a kind of self-organisation within each species, which has its own logic.”  Contrary to the long-held view of nature red in tooth and claw, Goodwin has written that humans are “every bit as co-operative as we are competitive; as altruistic as we are selfish.”So did Midgley argue that we need to rid science of metaphors?  No; she proposed new and better ones suitable for the 21st century – the language of integrated systems:Now the old metaphors of evolution need to give way to new ones founded on integrative thinking – reasoning based on systems thinking.  This way, the work of evolution can be seen as intelligible and constructive, not as a gamble driven randomly by the forces of competition.  And if non-competitive imagery is needed, systems biologist Denis Noble has a good go at it in The Music Of Life, where he points out how natural development, not being a car, needs no single “driver” to direct it.  Symphonies, he remarks, are not caused only by a single dominant instrument nor, indeed, solely by their composer.  And developing organisms do not even need a composer: they grow, as wholes, out of vast and ancient systems which are themselves parts of nature.She did not reveal whether she is an admirer of John Cage’s “chance music,” but his kind of music seems to be the only kind that emerges without a composer.  All other symphonies are usually composed and performed by intelligent design.  It could be argued, though, that even John Cage purposefully chose to produce his works in certain directed ways.  He had to choose to sit at a piano, for instance, and decide not to play for 4 minutes and 33 seconds, turning pages at pre-designed “movements.”  For the metaphor to work, Cage would have had to step aside and do absolutely nothing – but even that would be a choice.Metaphors bewitch you (07/04/2003).  If Mary Midgley wants to criticize earlier scientists for imposing their social values (like competition) on nature, then how can she avoid being criticized for imagining nature to be a self-organizing system?  The next philosopher in future years could just as easily sneer at Midgley’s own misguided conceptions of nature, just as she sneered at evolutionists for being guilty of the most thoughtless uses of metaphor.    Is it even possible for humans to perceive nature without metaphors?  If you look at the list, all of the suggested metaphors have presupposed intelligent agency: clocks, billiards, warfare, competition, selfish genes, symphonies.  Intelligence in the atomistic view is a little harder to spot, until you recognize that colliding atoms presuppose natural laws: spherical shapes, and consistent physics of collisions.  Theists draw on the metaphor of a Creator as Architect, Designer, Maker, and Overseer.  That is how God describes himself.  So if every other metaphor already presupposes intelligent agency, then theism must be the most accurate one.  Metaphors, therefore, can be true.    If metaphors are inescapable, the symphony one is a good one.  God becomes the composer and conductor, His creatures the obedient yet skilled musicians, the instruments the capabilities, skills and talents he has endowed on his works.  The music is extended in time, with moments of tension and relaxation, periods where the listener is uncertain where the work is headed, but all working toward a planned finale.    Remove the sheet music and the conductor, though, and you get nothing but endless tuning exercises that all sound alike.  Eventually the musicians leave and the music stops, having gone nowhere.  John Cage might be happy, but not the rest of us, who know design when we see it and hear it.  The fact that audiences vastly prefer Mozart to John Cage just might reveal something about reality.(Visited 184 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Teleconference Tuesday, July 16 to Discuss “Mandela Day” Events

first_imgThis event is over. To listen to the teleconference click the following linkMEDIA ADVISORY FOR:Teleconference on “Mandela Day” CelebrationsTuesday, July 16th at 10:30 a.m. EasternCONTACT:Simon Barber:  [email protected]  +1 (202) 276-50846Alec Saslow: [email protected] +1 (202) 789-7751MEDIA ADVISORYAmbassador of South Africa, Congressional Black Caucus Chair andTransAfrica to Preview Nationwide Celebration of Nelson Mandela’s 95th BirthdayTeleconference Tuesday, July 16 to Discuss “Mandela Day” EventsWashington, DC – The South African Embassy, the Coalition of Black Trade Unionists (CBTU) and TransAfrica — the Washington-based human rights organization that helped compel the U.S. government to act against apartheid in South Africa nearly 30 years ago – will co-host a teleconference on Tuesday, July 16th facilitated by Brand South Africa to outline the nationwide events to honor and celebrate “Mandela Day.”Coordinated by the embassy, TransAfrica and CBTU, events in Washington DC and 17 cities around the United States will celebrate Nelson Mandela’s 95th birthday on Thursday, July 18 with members of the original anti-apartheid and Free South Africa Movement, special guests and performances.WHAT:         Teleconference to discuss “Mandela Day” eventsWHO:           Ebrahim Rasool, South African Ambassador to the United StatesNicole Lee, President of TransAfricaCongresswoman Marcia Fudge (D-Ohio), Chair, Congressional Black     Caucus,                   Bill Lucy President Emeritus of CBTUWHEN:         Tuesday, July 16, 2013 at 10:30 a.m. Eastern (4:30 p.m. in Johannesburg)CALL-IN:      785-424-1052, Toll Free: 800-894-5910Toll Free from South Africa: 080-098-1020Conference ID: MANDELAPlease click here to sign-up if you plan to attend.ABOUT EBRAHIM RASOOLAmbassador Ebrahim Rasool is South Africa’s Ambassador to the United States of America. Before joining the Embassy, his most recent positions have included Member of Parliament in the National Assembly, Special Advisor to the State President of the Republic of South Africa and Premier (governor of the Western Cape Province).  Ambassador Rasool has a long history of involvement in the anti-apartheid struggle starting at high school and including leadership in the United Democratic Front (UDF) and the African National Congress (ANC).ABOUT MARCIA FUDGECongresswoman Marcia L. Fudge represents the 11th District of Ohio.  She is a committed public servant who brings a hard-working, problem-solving spirit to Congress and to the task of creating jobs, attacking predatory lending, and improving health care, small business and education. She served as Warrensville Heights’ first African American female Mayor, and, in 2012, the Congresswoman was unanimously elected by her colleagues to serve as the Chairwoman of the Congressional Black Caucus in the 113th Congress.ABOUT NICOLE LEENicole Lee is a lawyer, human rights expert and, since December 2006, the first female President of TransAfrica. She has conducted human rights investigations and missions documenting violations of human rights and dignity of the world’s most vulnerable populations. Ms. Lee has testified before Congress on international policy issues affecting Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean and racial minorities worldwide.  She has been featured on television and radio programs across the globe, including ABC’s 20/20, CNN’s Anderson Cooper 360 and the PBS Newshour.ABOUT BILL LUCYBill Lucy is President Emeritus of the Coalition of Black Trade Unionists (CBTU).  Mr. Lucy is a member of the AFL-CIO Executive Council and the first African American elected as president of Public Services International (PSI), the world’s largest labor federation.  Mr. Lucy worked closely with Dr. King during the strike by sanitation workers in Memphis in 1968. He was also one of the founders of the Free South Africa Movement that launched the successful anti-apartheid campaign in the U.S. in the mid-1980s. Mr. Lucy was honored with the Nelson Mandela Award for his contribution to South Africa’s freedom earlier this month.last_img read more

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Solar Groups At Odds Over Tax Credit Strategy

first_imgITC viewed as critical to solar’s growthSince the tax credit went into effect in 2006, it has helped annual PV installations to grow by more than 1,600%, SEIA says. The credit was extended in 2008, but it will end entirely for residential systems and drop from 30% to 10% for commercial systems unless Congress intervenes by the end of 2016.“The solar Investment Tax Credit is one of the most important federal policy mechanisms to support the deployment of solar energy in the United States,” the group’s website says. “The ITC continues to drive growth in the industry and job creation across the country.”The tax credit encourages homeowners to invest in solar equipment by knocking 30% of the cost of the system off their tax bills. If, for example, a homeowner invests $10,000 in a PV system, he or she can deduct 30% of that ($3,000) from taxes owed at the end of the year. An end to the ITC means that PV systems will rise in cost by 30% overnight.The SEIA says that the tax credit is responsible not only for “dramatic” increases in the number of systems that have been installed but also for an 86% growth in solar employment in the last four years, and a jobs creation rate nearly 20 times higher than overall employment growth.It also creates “market certainty” for companies, making them feel comfortable with long-term investments in the industry. That spurs technological innovation and lowers costs for consumers, SEIA says. Solar energy advocates worry that the expiration of a 30% federal tax credit for residential solar equipment at the end of 2016 will result in thousands of lost jobs and many fewer installations of photovoltaic (PV) systems. But the country’s two solar trade groups can’t agree on how or even whether to join forces to fight for an extension of the tax credit.One group, the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA), recently asked the Solar Electric Power Association (SEPA) to kick in $2 million for a lobbying effort to retain the income tax credit (ITC), Greentech Media reports. But SEPA said no, citing fears that getting involved in a campaign might threaten its reputation as an “unbiased educational organization.”Citing documents obtained by Greentech Media, Stephen Lacey reports SEIA chief Rhone Resch and board Chairman Nat Kreamer wrote a joint letter to SEPA president Julia Hamm expressing their concerns and asking for money to lobby for an extension.They warned that a failure to keep the credit would mean the loss of 100,000 jobs and a 60% drop in the number of U.S. PV installations. They’re also concerned that a large trade show organized jointly by the two groups, Solar Power International, would suffer.“Solar Power International, the primary source of SEPA’s budget, would be severely impacted due to a lack of exhibitors, sponsors and attendees,” the letter said, according to Greentech Media. “Our ability to carry out our respective missions would be challenged.”The appeal wasn’t enough for SEPA. “While SEPA fully appreciates the impact the ITC has had on the solar industry broadly as well as directly on Solar Power International, the Board determined that funding any elements of an advocacy campaign managed by a 501(c)6 may be detrimental to SEPA’s reputation as an unbiased educational organization,” Hamm replied in an email. A difference in outlooksAlthough both trade groups are nominally pro-solar, they have different missions and are categorized differently under federal tax laws. SEIA is a 501 (c)6 organization, Greentech Media said, while SEPA is a 501(c)3 group — the first a lobbying organization and the latter an organization limited to educational work.Officers on SEPA’s board of directors all are utility executives, as are many of the directors. SEIA’s board, on the other hand, includes a number of executives with such companies as SunPower Corporation, SolarCity, First Solar, and Standard Solar.Although it’s easy to surmise that the strong presence of utility executives on the SEPA board is what’s driving its lack of enthusiasm for an ITC lobbying effort, Hamm said that non-utility board members also thought that advocacy was inappropriate.Hamm told Greentech Media that SEPA was still thinking about how it might participate in the ITC debate. “We’re certainly not ignoring it,” she said. “We just don’t have an agenda. Not having an agenda ensures that any research we conduct will be credible.”last_img read more

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a month agoMan City boss Guardiola reveals new squad addition

first_imgMan City boss Guardiola reveals new squad additionby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester City youngster Taylor Harwood-Bellis has been officially promoted to the first-team squad.City boss Pep Guardiola confirmed the news on Saturday.“From now on, he will train with us,” Guardiola said of the 17 year-old. “Whether he will play or not, we’ll see.“The guys from the academy spoke really well about him before pre-season.“I saw in pre-season. He is aggressive, he wins duels, he pays attention.“ About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Duke Basketball Posts Instagram Video Of Freshman Guard Luke Kennard’s Impressive Hops

first_imgLuke Kennard reacts after hitting a three-pointer.DURHAM, NC – FEBRUARY 28: Luke Kennard #5 of the Duke Blue Devils reacts after a play during their game against the Florida State Seminoles at Cameron Indoor Stadium on February 28, 2017 in Durham, North Carolina. (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)Duke will be counting on several true freshmen to help the program defend its national championship next season. One of them is five-star shooting guard Luke Kennard.The Blue Devils’ team Instagram account posted video tonight of Kennard throwing down an alley-oop to himself off the backboard with one hand. Pretty impressive. Duke fans are no doubt hoping to see some of that in game action this year.last_img read more

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ExNFL Player Released from Team Over Gun Charge Says

Former NFL linebacker Khaseem Greene/WikipediaELIZABETH, N.J. (AP) — A former NFL linebacker says in a lawsuit that police and prosecutors in New Jersey knew a shooter had lied about getting a weapon from the player but charged him anyway.A gun charge against Khaseem Greene was dropped in July after an audio recording surfaced of the other man telling detectives he lied about Greene’s involvement in a shooting outside a nightclub in Elizabeth in December 2016.The Kansas City Chiefs released Greene the day charges against him were reported.The other man’s admission came the day he told detectives Greene was involved. But it wasn’t included in a criminal complaint that alleged Greene was seen on camera handing him a gun.The suit, filed Tuesday, names the Elizabeth Police Department, and the Union County Prosecutors Office. Messages seeking comment left with the agencies weren’t immediately returned. read more

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Ohio State mens basketball ready to pursue coach Thad Mattas sixth Big

OSU men’s basketball coach Thad Matta speaks to the team before practice Friday at the Schottenstein Center. OSU is set to begin its season Saturday against Morgan State. Credit: Shelby Lum / Photo editorThe Ohio State men’s basketball team welcomes Morgan State to the Schottenstein Center Saturday as it begins the pursuit of yet another deep NCAA Tournament run.OSU coach Thad Matta welcomes back eight players from last season’s team that lost to Wichita State, 70-66, in the Elite Eight. Notable returners are senior guards Aaron Craft and Lenzelle Smith Jr., junior forwards LaQuinton Ross and Sam Thompson and junior guard Shannon Scott. With that many players holding extensive game experience, Scott said “the sky’s the limit” for OSU this season.“I believe the sky’s the limit for us really,” Scott said. “We believe we can be a national champion, a Big Ten champion but we know we have other things we have to work on. We can’t come in on days and not play our best. We gotta be ready with our ‘A’ game or we’re going to lose.”Thompson agreed with Scott, adding that the team is looking to build off the success from last year.“We have a veteran basketball team, a team that’s been here, a team that knows how to win and a team that’s won,” Thompson said. “We’re just excited to get after it against real opponents now in the games that count and really look to build on what we started last year.”Matta said the team is much farther ahead than it usually is at this point in the season — especially on defense.“I think that we got our core principles down sooner maybe than we have in the past,” Matta said Friday. “I think it’s allowed us to be hopefully a little more defensively. I want us to be as aggressive as we possibly can.”The Buckeyes finished 27th in the nation in scoring defense last year, only giving up 59.4 points per game. That comes from a cohesiveness on the defensive side of the ball, Matta said, which starts on the perimeter.“I think we’ve got four of what I consider the best defenders in the country with Aaron (Craft), Shannon (Scott), Lenzelle (Smith) and Sam Thompson,” Matta said. “Those guys, you see them taking more chances, being just a little bit more aggressive. Which I love to see.”Matta said the starting lineup “could change periodically” this season.“So much of it is just the role definition of what we need guys to do and what they’re capable of doing,” Matta said. “I think we’ve got great depth.”Regardless of who starts, the goal always remains the same.“Nobody in that locker room cares about who gets called out for starting lineups,” Thompson said. “At the end of the day we all want to win, and we all want to do what’s best for the program. Whoever gets called to start the game, gets called to start the game.”Morgan State returns a lot of veteran players from a team that went 17-15 last season, and 10-6 in the MEAC. The Bears have four seniors and two juniors, all who played significant time last season.“They have a lot of size and go rebound the ball well,” Thompson said. “We know that they’re a good basketball team coming in, and we have our work cut out for us.”It’s not a secret that the team is ready to get the season started in pursuit of Matta’s sixth Big Ten title in what will be his 10th season at the helm.“I like the energy, I like the fire we’ve had,” Matta said. “We’ve been competing and we’ll continue to compete … but all the work they’ve done up to this point, now it’s time to go and go against somebody for real.”Tip off against the Bears is scheduled for noon Saturday at the Schottenstein Center. read more

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Ohio State womens volleyball takes 2 in Cincinnati

Sophomore middle blocker Taylor Sandbothe (10) and junior outside hitter Katie Mitchell (17) go for a block during a match against FGCU on Sept. 5 at St. John Arena. OSU won, 3-1.Credit: Emily YarcuskoThe Ohio State women’s volleyball team took two of three matches at the Millennium Hotel Invitational to improve to 6-3 on the season.OSU first beat Syracuse University (5-4) on Friday, before losing to Ohio University (6-3) and then bounced back to defeat Xavier University (6-3) in its final tournament game.In the third game of the invitational against host Xavier, the Buckeyes had to fight their way to victory as they defeated Musketeers in five sets (17-25, 25-21, 25-19, 24-26, 15-11).Sophomore middle blocker Taylor Sandbothe led all players in kills with 18. Senior outside hitter Erin Sekinger contributed 16 kills and junior outside hitter Katie Mitchell had 12. Sophomore libero Valeria León led all players with 20 digs and freshman outside hitter Luisa Schirmer added 10 of her own.In their second match of the weekend and first on Saturday, against coach Geoff Carlston’s former team, the Buckeyes lost to the Bobcats in four sets (26-28, 22-25, 26-24, 21-25).Sekinger led the Buckeyes in total kills with 16 and added two digs. Sandbothe had 14 kills with five digs and four blocks, while Mitchell added 11 kills, two digs and a block. León and Schirmer each had 18 digs, while senior setter Taylor Sherwin added 40 assists.In their first game of the invitational against Syracuse, the Buckeyes were tested, but came out winners in a five-set victory against the Orange (25-22, 20-25, 25-13, 23-25, 15-8).Five Buckeyes recorded double-digit kills as Sandbothe led all players with 20. Junior outside hitter Elizabeth Campbell followed with 16 kills, five digs and two blocks. Sekinger had 13 kills, while sophomore outside hitter Kylie Randall had 12 and Schirmer had 11. León led all players in digs with 23, while Sherwin had 18 and Schirmer had 17.Sandbothe and Sekinger were both named to the Millennium Hotel Invitational all-tournament team. Sandbothe has been named to all-tournament team in each of the three tournaments the Buckeyes have competed in this season.The Buckeyes are scheduled to head to Oxford, Ohio, next weekend as they are set to compete in the Miami University Invitational. OSU is scheduled to play the University of Alabama at Birmingham (3-7) on Friday at 4 p.m., followed by Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (4-7) on Saturday at 10 a.m. and Miami (Ohio) (5-4) at 7 p.m.The Buckeyes are set to open Big Ten play on Sept. 24 at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, Minn. The match is scheduled to start at 8 p.m. read more

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