9 months agoBournemouth, Southampton chasing Brentford defender Chris Mepham

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Bournemouth, Southampton chasing Brentford defender Chris Mephamby Paul Vegas9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveBournemouth and Southampton are chasing Brentford defender Chris Mepham.The Sun says Bournemouth are set to bid £15m for Mepham as they look to land the young defender ahead of Southampton.Bournemouth boss Eddie Howe wants a centre-back to complete his January spending after landing Dominic Solanke and Nathaniel Clyne early in the window.Brentford defender Mepham is a long-term target and Howe failed with a £10million summer bid for the 21-year-old Wales international.But he will move for him again and launch a £15million raid to get him ahead of south-coast rivals Southampton, who are also interested in Bees forward Ollie Watkins. last_img read more

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a month agoMan City boss Guardiola reveals new squad addition

first_imgMan City boss Guardiola reveals new squad additionby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester City youngster Taylor Harwood-Bellis has been officially promoted to the first-team squad.City boss Pep Guardiola confirmed the news on Saturday.“From now on, he will train with us,” Guardiola said of the 17 year-old. “Whether he will play or not, we’ll see.“The guys from the academy spoke really well about him before pre-season.“I saw in pre-season. He is aggressive, he wins duels, he pays attention.“ About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Passionate sports fans shed tears

Sports are often marginalized into just-a-game diatribes or wins-versus-losses arguments. But sports are so much more than that. They can spawn any sort of emotion imaginable. One day they might elicit 1,000-watt smiles. Other days they generate self-induced purgatory. Here’s a timeline of some sentiments I’ve experienced because of sports in my hometown of Cincinnati, just in the past year. Last season, the Bengals underwent a season of incredible triumph and indescribable tragedy. When defensive coordinator Mike Zimmer came home Oct. 9, 2009, he found his wife dead. Vikki Zimmer had died of natural causes. Just three days later, Zimmer watched from the sidelines as his defense held Baltimore scoreless for three-and-a-half quarters and the Bengals pulled out a narrow victory against the Ravens. If your eyes didn’t well up when the players handed Zimmer the ball in the locker room after the game or when he told the team, “She’s up there now in heaven smiling at you,” you might want to check your pulse. Not too long after that, wide receiver Chad Ochocinco made me cry on two separate occasions. How did perhaps the most outlandish and self-serving wide receiver in the game today kick-start my tear ducts? On Dec. 16, 2009, word began rolling into Cincinnati that Chad’s teammate and good friend Chris Henry had fallen out of a moving pickup truck driven by his fiancée. Henry died the next day. Reporters interviewed Ochocinco at his locker shortly after the news of Henry’s death reached the team. He talked about how Henry, one of the prime violators of the NFL’s personal conduct policy, had done a 180 with his life. How he had turned the corner. How he was focused on his family. Then with tears slowly consuming his eyes, Ochocinco questioned the “man upstairs” about why he had to take Henry. As a man with uncertain faith because of deaths in my own family, Ochocinco struck a chord with me. As I sat and watched Ochocinco talk about his friend, our two faces soon became one as I, too, mourned Henry. Tears streamed down my face like raindrops running down a windowsill. A few days later, the Bengals visited San Diego. In the second quarter, Ochocinco beat Charger cornerback Antonio Cromartie on a double move for a long touchdown reception. It was a streak down the sideline that Bengals fans saw from Henry on occasion. When he reached the end zone, Ochocinco gingerly dropped to one knee and gazed at the sky. He got up and walked back to the sideline, the “king of end-zone celebrations,” dethroned by the aching in his soul. When the cameras zoomed in on his face, Ochocinco’s expression was clear. So was mine. I sat in front of my television and, like Ochocinco, I wept for Chris Henry, a man I’d never met before in my life. When I attended the Bengals’ playoff game last season, I could feel the (cue sports-writing clichés) electricity in the city walking to Paul Brown Stadium. When “Welcome to the Jungle” blared through the stadium speakers as the team sprinted out through the tunnel, goose bumps covered my body. I felt as if I was in a sports twilight zone, immersed in a crowd of buoyant pandemonium. The great thing about growing up in Cincinnati is that we not only have the Bengals, but we also have the Cincinnati Reds. This summer a Cuban missile landed in my fair city. Aroldis Chapman, the 22-year-old with the 100-plus fastball and $30-million arm, made his long-awaited Cincinnati Reds debut Aug. 31. I was as giddy as kid on Christmas morning. I wasn’t even in the ballpark, yet I could close my eyes and hear the roar of the masses as the long-legged phenom strode to the mound. Nervous anticipation filled my body as he warmed up, like I was in a hospital waiting room awaiting the birth of my first child. Then he came, he saw and he conquered. Milwaukee Brewers hitters were helpless against him. He made professional hitters look ordinary, like little leaguers flailing at their first curveball. If they blinked, they would miss his 103-mph fastball entirely, only hearing the hiss of the ball crossing the corner of the plate and into the catcher’s mitt. I sat on my couch and was flabbergasted. It wasn’t a “wow” moment. It wasn’t even a “holy s—” moment. It was a leap-off-the-couch, jump-around-like-a-5-year-old, call-your-buddy-and-yell, “Did you see that slider start on the outside corner of the strike zone and almost hit the batter in the foot?” type of moment. That’s what sports can deliver. In less than a year. To one city. read more

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Ohio State mens basketball ready to pursue coach Thad Mattas sixth Big

OSU men’s basketball coach Thad Matta speaks to the team before practice Friday at the Schottenstein Center. OSU is set to begin its season Saturday against Morgan State. Credit: Shelby Lum / Photo editorThe Ohio State men’s basketball team welcomes Morgan State to the Schottenstein Center Saturday as it begins the pursuit of yet another deep NCAA Tournament run.OSU coach Thad Matta welcomes back eight players from last season’s team that lost to Wichita State, 70-66, in the Elite Eight. Notable returners are senior guards Aaron Craft and Lenzelle Smith Jr., junior forwards LaQuinton Ross and Sam Thompson and junior guard Shannon Scott. With that many players holding extensive game experience, Scott said “the sky’s the limit” for OSU this season.“I believe the sky’s the limit for us really,” Scott said. “We believe we can be a national champion, a Big Ten champion but we know we have other things we have to work on. We can’t come in on days and not play our best. We gotta be ready with our ‘A’ game or we’re going to lose.”Thompson agreed with Scott, adding that the team is looking to build off the success from last year.“We have a veteran basketball team, a team that’s been here, a team that knows how to win and a team that’s won,” Thompson said. “We’re just excited to get after it against real opponents now in the games that count and really look to build on what we started last year.”Matta said the team is much farther ahead than it usually is at this point in the season — especially on defense.“I think that we got our core principles down sooner maybe than we have in the past,” Matta said Friday. “I think it’s allowed us to be hopefully a little more defensively. I want us to be as aggressive as we possibly can.”The Buckeyes finished 27th in the nation in scoring defense last year, only giving up 59.4 points per game. That comes from a cohesiveness on the defensive side of the ball, Matta said, which starts on the perimeter.“I think we’ve got four of what I consider the best defenders in the country with Aaron (Craft), Shannon (Scott), Lenzelle (Smith) and Sam Thompson,” Matta said. “Those guys, you see them taking more chances, being just a little bit more aggressive. Which I love to see.”Matta said the starting lineup “could change periodically” this season.“So much of it is just the role definition of what we need guys to do and what they’re capable of doing,” Matta said. “I think we’ve got great depth.”Regardless of who starts, the goal always remains the same.“Nobody in that locker room cares about who gets called out for starting lineups,” Thompson said. “At the end of the day we all want to win, and we all want to do what’s best for the program. Whoever gets called to start the game, gets called to start the game.”Morgan State returns a lot of veteran players from a team that went 17-15 last season, and 10-6 in the MEAC. The Bears have four seniors and two juniors, all who played significant time last season.“They have a lot of size and go rebound the ball well,” Thompson said. “We know that they’re a good basketball team coming in, and we have our work cut out for us.”It’s not a secret that the team is ready to get the season started in pursuit of Matta’s sixth Big Ten title in what will be his 10th season at the helm.“I like the energy, I like the fire we’ve had,” Matta said. “We’ve been competing and we’ll continue to compete … but all the work they’ve done up to this point, now it’s time to go and go against somebody for real.”Tip off against the Bears is scheduled for noon Saturday at the Schottenstein Center. read more

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Chicharito cries after Germany win

first_imgChicharito has admitted that Mexico’s win over Germany in their FIFA World Cup opener on Sunday was deeply emotional for him as it caught him rolling out tears yet maintains Mexico are focused on ensuring it won’t be the high point of their campaign.Mexico’s win brought them three points and it meant Mexico got their World Cup off to the perfect start but the Hammers striker took a moment to reflect on Mexico’s win and says he cried the most.“After the final whistle I celebrated it the way I am, like someone emotional,” he said, according to club’s website.“In the locker room some laughed, others shouted, I celebrated it my way, I was the one who cried the most.“We have taken a very important step, and we have to go calmly, to enjoy it. We are very excited, we have started the World Cup on the right foot, but from tomorrow we will start working 100% towards the match against South Korea.“If we don’t win that match and the one against Sweden, beating Germany would have served no purpose at all.”Top 5 Bundesliga players to watch during the weekend Tomás Pavel Ibarra Meda – September 11, 2019 With the international activity cooling down for the next month, we go back to the Bundesliga’s Top 5 players to watch next weekend.The German…Chicharito was part of a front three alongside PSV Einhoven’s Lozano and Porto man Miguel Layun which caused Germany no end of problems on the counter-attack.He was delighted to play his part, especially in front of such a strong Mexican support.He added:“I tried to give everything, in the best way, I gave an assist. Lozano had a great match too, here there are no heroes, we all played great, from Memo (Ochoa) to Javier.“We feel like we were playing at home, the anthem ceremony was extremely exciting.”last_img read more

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Callum HudsonOdoi has great potential – Sarri

first_imgChelsea manager Maurizio Sarri believes that youngster Callum Hudson-Odoi has the potential to be one of the best players in Europe.With his Chelsea contract set to expire in 18 months, Hudson-Odoi has been linked to Bayern Munich and other top European clubs.Chelsea reported rejected an offer of more than £20m from Bayern for the 18-year-old this week and Sarri believes he has a future at West London.“He [Hudson-Odoi] is a very good player, the potential is there for becoming a great player, and now he has to improve,” Sarri told Sky Sports.Sacchi explains Sarri, Conte, and Ancelotti Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 Arrigo Sacchi talked about how Sarri has a tougher time at Juventus than Conte at Inter; while Ancelotti’s “blood is boiling” at Napoli.Arrigo Sacchi…“He has to improve, I think, in movement without the ball. As a winger, he has to improve in the defensive phase, but he has the potential to become a very important player, not only for English football I think but for European football.“It’s not easy at this level to take the young players from the academy and he’s ready to play, not only here, everywhere in Europe.“We are lucky because we have [Ethan] Ampadu, we have [Andreas] Christensen, we have Odoi. We are really very lucky, or the academy is very good.”last_img read more

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SD City Council Committee holds meeting on controversial carotid restraint

first_img Elizabeth Alvarez, Updated: 8:40 PM SD City Council Committee holds meeting on controversial carotid restraint Elizabeth Alvarez Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwittercenter_img Posted: April 25, 2018 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) — Members of the San Diego City Council Committee on Public Safety met Wednesday to review the concerns that some people have about police practices including restraint techniques.A handful of people showed up to Wednesday’s committee meeting at city hall.“We are here to support a ban on the carotid restraint. We realize that most major cities have already banned this restraint.” Said Yusef Miller with The Racial Justice Coalition of San Diego.A carotid restraint is a neck restraint that involves squeezing the arteries so that the suspect passes out.Although concerned citizens at the meeting kept referring to the carotid restraint being the same as the choke hold, it is not the same according to police.San Diego Police Chief David Nisleit, who is at the committee meeting for another matter, said the effects are different. The chief explained that chokehold technique can cut off the windpipe and be more lethal. This is a technique that Chief Nisleit said the San Diego Police Department does not use.No action was taken during the committee meeting. Members will wait for the Community Review Board to present more information on neck restraint at a later date before it decides to make any recommendations to the city council. April 25, 2018last_img read more

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