Dead & Company Plan To Promote Marijuana Legalization On ‘Jimmy Kimmel Live’ Tonight

first_imgTonight marks the second-ever performance of Dead & Company on national television, as the rockers will hit Jimmy Kimmel Live tonight to perform an outdoor concert. The show comes at an interesting political climate in California, as the state is voting on a proposition that could legalize recreational cannabis.Naturally, the members of Dead & Company are planning to come out in full support of the new proposition. Their approach is subtle: instead of trying to say something, the band has invited 300 marijuana legalization activists to join them in the crowd. A handful of pro-legizalization groups, including California Cannabis Industry Assn and medical marijuana collective Buds & Roses have been instructed not only to wear t-shirts, but to bring signs and dress up as giant joints to reach a national audience.“The folks it would be hitting on that broadcast would be outside our normal sphere of influence,” said Bob Weir in an interview with the LA Times. “We’re about music, but we’re about other stuff as well, and we always have been. We need to make our feelings on the subject as apparent as we can.”Dead & Company made their feelings quite apparent when their fall 2015 tour landed in Denver, Colorado – a state where marijuana has been legalized. Check out some of these amazing photos from the band’s trip to the dispensaries from last fall.While this approach by Dead & Company is pigeonholed by network restrictions, it’s still a smart and respectful way to get the message out in a pivotal election season. “They’re respectful advocates, and they’re very thoughtful in their approach to this entire industry,” said manager Bernie Cahill. “I don’t see that changing.”Good luck Dead & Company! Maybe they’ll play “High Time” on Kimmel tonight…last_img read more

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Watch Stephen Colbert Rip Into Ticketmaster Settlement

first_imgTicketmaster has been all over the news recently with their free ticket voucher code program, a result of them losing a class-action lawsuit for overcharging fans. After the free-ticket voucher-code program had it’s ups and downs over the past few days, with many fans complaining of an inability to use their vouchers, Ticketmaster announced that the program was closed, and that half of the $10 Million-worth of tickets they were required to deliver to fans had been fulfilled. Then, this morning, it seems they secretly re-opened the voucher program with more eligible events added to their list, and, off course, the majority of the shows (and most of the ones worth going to) sold out immediately, leaving most fans back where they started.With all of the public ups and downs of this lawsuit that affects the majority of concert-goers since 1999, Stephen Colbert, host of The Late Show on CBS, addressed the Ticketmaster lawsuit scandal in his opening monologue last night. He really let it rip, getting in good shots on Guns’n’Roses, Smash Mouth, and the mostly low-quality of events that the ticketing giant is offering as part of this program.Watch the full video of Stephen Colbert discussing Ticketmaster below:last_img read more

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Ween’s Claude Coleman Discusses The Band’s Decision To Reunite

first_imgLate last year, beloved rockers Ween surprised fans with the announcement of their reunion. Drummer Claude Coleman, Jr. spoke at length about that decision to reunite in a piece with Songfacts, talking about how the pressure of having four of five members in the Dean Ween Group eventually spurred Gene Ween to rejoin the fray.Coleman talks at length about the situation, and you can read his comments below.Mickey [Melchiondo] was doing all these Dean Ween Group shows. It was pretty cool, we were having a lot of fun with those, and I think Mickey was just planning on doing those forever and ever. And I think somehow unconsciously, having Mickey out there doing those shows affected the whole process of them sort of coming back together. We were starting to sell out everywhere. We did this run on the West Coast and we were just crushing it – I think that put a little insidious pressure on Papa Gene.I’m kind of hypothesizing, but there wasn’t any real concerted thing that happened. There wasn’t like an instance or moment where it happened. It was a slow, gradual process with Mickey out there playing. A lot of people were like, “What is this? This is four fifths of the band. What’s the point?” I think it was the natural pressure of that, and I think it sort of happened on its own. Another thing too was the management. Mickey and Aaron’s managers, Ben Sands and Patrick Jordan, worked closely together. So there’s a lot of this in-family jostling around, and again it was like this insidious, subtle nudging and pressure on those two. Having the same company and managers kind of brought them together, and everything kind of fell in line. It’s kind of super-insidious and super-incestuous. They did great work, Patrick and Brad are both great guys, and they brought it together.Coleman also spoke about how Ween is different now than they were in 2012.It’s a little more formal now, for us. Backstage is really tight. It’s a dry backstage, and there’s a lot less nonsense now. I think that makes the whole thing more professional, sort of formal. Another thing that’s lending itself to that feeling is that we’re rehearsing a lot, which we never really used to do because Mickey and Aaron hated rehearsing. Now they love it because they can see the benefits of it. For the Denver shows, we rehearsed seven days straight, every day, in the afternoons before the shows, in the arena, and I think it really showed. We just crushed it.So that makes a difference: We’re into rehearsing. It’s a given now that we have to rehearse. And when we get together, there’s this new revived energy about it all. It’s pretty badass. We’d been doing it for so long, you know? Then we took three-and-a-half years off and when we got back together, it was just like, “Hey, what’s up?” and then we were playing again. It wasn’t much different than that, just the way we went about it was a lot more careful, more considerate and thoughtful. It’s a more purposeful thing now, and it’s good. It’s a great thing. That’s not to say that we take ourselves seriously, but we take ourselves a little more seriously now.The drummer also denied that the band is working on a new album, though he has stated that Mickey Melchiondo, Jr. has been writing for the Dean Ween Group. You can read the full interview here!last_img read more

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Warren Haynes Talks Gov’t Mule’s Beginnings, New Album & The ‘Magical’ Red Rocks Performance

first_imgFans of guitarist Warren Haynes have had things good in 2016. The guitarist has found time for his many project, ranging from the folk-inspired Ashes & Dust Band to the rockin’ and rollin’ of Gov’t Mule to the summertime symphonic tributes for the late great Jerry Garcia. This week in particular has held quite a lot of excitement, as Haynes played Garcia’s “Tiger” guitar for the first time publicly since 1995, to perform a symphonic tribute on his birthday at Red Rocks Amphitheatre. Not only that, but Mule has an exciting Tel-Star Sessions disc due out this Friday, August 5th, which captures the band’s first-ever recorded works.With all of this excitement, our own Dave Melamed caught up with Haynes on the road to chat about everything! Check out the full interview below.L4LM: With the big archival release coming out this week, I was hoping you could walk us through the definitive Tel-Star Sessions.Warren Haynes: Well, those were the first recordings Gov’t Mule ever made. We were still pretty much considering ourselves a side project and not yet an actual band. The nine songs that we recorded, I should say the nine songs that we’re releasing are the only nine songs that we recorded. There’s nothing else from those sessions.These were sessions that we financed ourselves, with the original intent of releasing them as an extremely low budget experimental sort of record. We started getting a lot of interest from record companies, and decided to put those recordings on the shelf and actually sign with a label, hire a producer, and go in and make a record having written more songs after those sessions. So those wound up on the shelf.L4LM: How did you decide to release them now?WH: I’ve always wanted to make them available at some point, knowing they would need to be some sort of archival release. There’s only two songs out of the nine that haven’t surfaced somewhere on one of our studio recordings. It really came out when we were looking for things to put out for the 20th anniversary. I went back and listened to the Tel-Star sessions and really found myself smiling and very proud of what we had done, and thought, “yeah this would be a good time to do that, as part of the 20th.”L4LM: You mentioned listening back and loving it. Aside from the obvious lineup changes, how does 1994 Mule compare to 2016 Mule?WH: Well the spirit is pretty much the same. The chemistry we had from the very beginning was quite uncanny, especially the chemistry between Matt [Abts, drummer] and Allen [Woody, bassist], which is, I think, very obvious on these recordings.But that’s a snapshot of the whole philosophy that shaped Gov’t Mule for the future. We didn’t want to adhere to the normal philosophies of rock bands, especially in that period of time. We wanted to pave our own way and do something unique that started out as an idea of bringing back the improvisational trio, which we felt like nobody was doing. It just kind of one step at a time, it snowballed, and started building its own steam.L4LM: So is this recording one of those ‘Oh My God’ moments in the foundation of the band?WH: Yeah, I mean we had just started playing together when we made these recordings. Part of the initial plan was to go into the studio and make a recording. That was even more a part of the plan than touring. We didn’t know we were going to tour or stay together or anything. We just wanted to release some strange side project record, and that’s what this would have been but every day we were together felt more and more like a real band, which it started to become. That’s the reason we killed these recordings in the first place. It was just changing every week. The band was growing and it was an exciting time.L4LM: You mentioned the chemistry between Matt and Allen. What did that open up for you, as far as the guitarist playing off that rhythm section?WH: It’s very propulsive. It inspires me to play on top of all this chaos that’s already in existence, so I can choose a multitude of ways of doing that. I can be really legato on top of what they’re doing and melodic, or I can add to the frenzy, or I can inspire a different type of frenzy. It’s all like taking a jazz approach to rock music, where every moment influences the next moment. That’s the way all of us love to play music, and that’s the music we all love to listen to.The first time we played together, we had that kind of chemistry, and that’s really what we wanted to capture.L4LM: When you talk about rock trios, obviously Cream comes to mind. How do you see yourselves with the lineage of trio bands?WH: I think that’s the quintessential rock trio. We were all influenced by Cream as an entity, and we were all influenced by them individually. Woody was a huge Jack Bruce fan. Matt was a huge Ginger Baker fan. Clapton was my first guitar hero. But the music that Cream made was so unique, and it didn’t last very long. It was like lightning in a bottle, and then it went away.We also love the Hendrix Experience and Band of Gypsys. We also love trios plus a singer, like The Who and Free and Led Zeppelin. So we were taking cues from a lot of different directions, but the jams themselves were influenced by all of the things we just talked about, but also just by our love of jazz. We listened to so much jazz. We were just an extension of all of that.L4LM: You can really hear it in these recordings, all of the influences coming together.WH: It was just an exciting moment, because we were still figuring out who we were as a band. It was that period of discovery, so to speak. As I mentioned before, we hadn’t yet decided if we were going to continue this. So it was really in the process of changing from a project to a band. We were starting to have daily discussions about, well maybe we should go on the road and continue this whole process.Partially because, Woody and I who were full time members of the Allman Brothers, we still had a lot of time on our hands because the Allman Brothers were off for the rest of the year. But the morale and the communication in the Allman Brothers at that point was starting to unravel, as it did quite often. There was no writing, no rehearsing, no recording, and in Gov’t Mule all of those things were happening. The whole shift of interest was starting to take place.L4LM: Speaking of the Allman Brothers, I know Oteil Burbridge has said that he’s heard talks of a reunion in the works. Care to comment on that?WH: I think it’s too early to tell at this point. I don’t see it happening any time soon, but I’m not able to shed any light on that.L4LM: I know you’ve been talking about a new Gov’t Mule album coming out. How’s that going?WH: I’ve talked hypothetically and theoretically about what I’m hoping it will be. The most important thing for me is that it be different than anything we’ve done, and that we go back and revisit the beginning of Gov’t Mule. Also know that, any time we go into the studio, things have a way of changing into something that we didn’t predict, so I’m sure I have no idea what’s going to happen when we get in there.L4LM: So you have plans to record soon?WH: We’re hoping to go in in November. I’ve been doing a lot of writing, and Danny Louis and I will start doing some writing together here soon. Then the band as a whole will start writing together, and utilizing whatever happens on the road and rehearsal. I’m curious to see where it’s all going to go but I’m very psyched about it.L4LM: That’s great! Before I let you go, I have to ask about the Red Rocks show, where you paid tribute to Jerry Garcia on his birthday with the Colorado Symphony and Melvin Seals.WH: It was quite an honor to be able to play Tiger for the first time since Jerry passed. When I picked up Tiger the day before at rehearsal, it still had the same strings that were on it from the last time Jerry played it.Playing that music, with the Symphony and the bonus set with Melvin… playing it at Red Rocks for that crowd on his birthday. It was very emotional for everybody, and I think it was one of those nights that just fell into place. It was very magical.L4LM: It really did mean a lot to all of the fans. You’re a big part of the Grateful Dead legacy.WH: I’m honored to have had that opportunity. It was a beautiful night.L4LM: Well thank you so much for taking the time out to talk with us. Good luck with everything!WH: My pleasure.last_img read more

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Watch Gov’t Mule & Blackberry Smoke Members Play 19-Minute ‘Cortez The Killer’

first_imgGov’t Mule just kicked off a summer tour run with Blackberry Smoke, coming in fine fashion to The Stone Pony at Asbury Park, NJ last night. The “Smokin’ Mule” tour is bringing some serious fire, as evidenced by last night’s jammed out encore. With Charlie Starr and Brandon Still of Blackberry Smoke in tow, Mule delivered a 19-minute version of Neil Young’s classic “Cortez The Killer” that won’t soon be forgotten!Thanks to Sean Roche, we can watch this incredible jam session below.Check out the full setlist from the performance, as shared by Gov’t Mule.Setlist: Gov’t Mule at The Stone Pony, Asbury Park, NJ – 8/12/16Set 1: World Boss > Mother Earth, Left Coast Groovies, Broke Down On The Brazos, Rocking Horse, Stoop So Low, Slackjaw Jezebel with Hush teaseSet 2: Forsaken Savior > Stratus, No Need To Suffer, Painted Silver Light > Game Face with Birdland & Mountain Jam teases, About To Rage, Mr. ManEncore: Cortez The Killer with Charlie Starr & Brandon Stilllast_img read more

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Alan Evans Previews The All Brothers Band With Neal Evans, Oteil & Kofi Burbridge

first_imgForget a sibling rivalry, Alan and Neal Evans share in sibling revelry. The musical and familial bond goes back to their time learning their instruments as children, to their seminal run with upstate New Yorkers Moon Boot Lover, to their nearly twenty-years as two-thirds of jazz/funk titans Soulive, and beyond.Recently, the Evans brothers shacked up in the studio with another supersonic sibling set, Oteil and Kofi Burbridge, no strangers to the world of super jam scenarios. For Brooklyn Comes Alive (as well as an upcoming studio release), the dual duos come together as The All Brothers Band. Ever busy with a gig or in the studio, we were blessed with a few minutes to chat up drummer Alan Evans, discussing what this band of brothers is all about.L4LM: Please tell the people a little bit about the brothers Evans and Burbridge coming together as (aptly-monikered) The All Brothers Band? I understand there was a studio session?AE: Well I’m getting very close to launching my own record label called Vintage League Music.  This has been a long process and early on I had the idea to record the four of us and put out an EP.  We have recorded something and are in the process of finishing it up.  We don’t have a release date yet but all I can say is, we love it and it’s not what people are going to be expecting!!L4LM: When I ask what’s so great about making music with your brother Neal, what’s the first thing to come to mind?AE: The thing that is always great about rocking with Neal is no matter what the situation is or who we are playing with, it always feels good.  Because we’ve been doing this together our entire lives, we are able to bring something to the table that other people can’t.  That’s always a lot of fun.L4LM: Now onto the “other” brothers, Oteil and Kofi Burbridge, also accomplished and revered players in the scene. How did you and your brother get hip to those cats? Any stories or sit-ins, or memories that you can share?AE: Wow! Neal and I first opened for the Aquarium Rescue Unit in Chapel Hill, NC back in 1994 with our band Moon Boot Lover.  Right off the bat, we were super tight with Oteil.  It wasn’t long after that we ran into Kofi.  There are so many great moments that we’ve all shared on stage, I wouldn’t know where to begin.  A more recent one comes to mind though.  A couple of years back we were doing Bowlive and The Allman Brothers were at the Beacon.  Oteil and Kofi said they were going to try and make it down but we hadn’t heard or seen them by the end of our show at the Bowl.  So we end the night after long evening of music and all of a sudden Kofi and Oteil come running in.  A lot of the audience left because they thought it was the end of the show but we went on for another set.  We were all tired but as soon as we started playing, something magical happened.  That was definitely a night to remember!!L4LM: What can the SOLD OUT Brooklyn Comes Alive expect from the All-Brothers Band?AE: Hahaha, good question because I honestly don’t know myself.  I have a pretty good feeling there are going to be a lot of smiles on stage and in the crowd though.  That always happens when we get together!!L4LM: Alan Evans, you are a gentleman and a scholar. Thank you for your time today!last_img read more

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Twiddle Welcomes Soule Monde & Aqueous For Collaborative New Year’s Celebration

first_imgTwiddle held it down at Albany’s Palace Theatre on New Year’s Eve, celebrating the end of 2016 with some very special guests. The night started with opening performances from Soule Monde and Aqueous, each bringing their brand of jam rock into the venue to get the party going.When it came time for Twiddle to ring in the New Year, they brought out all of Soule Monde and Aqueous to celebrate. With 10 musicians on stage, Twiddle rocked a great “Auld Lang Syne” before segueing into the ALO song, “BBQ.”Watch the festivities below, in this video captured by fan Steve Marshall.Setlist: Twiddle | Palace Theatre | Albany, NY | 12/31/16Set 1: Moments, Doinkinbonk, Lost In The Cold, Blunderbuss, Daydream Farmer, Dusk til Dawn, ApplesSet 2: Auld Lang Syne*, BBQ*, Polluted Beauty, Zazu’s Flight, Jamflowman, FrankenfooteEncore: Layla+*with Soule Monde (Ray Paczkowski & Russ Lawton) & Aqueous+with Mike Gantzer and Dave Loss of Aqueouslast_img read more

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Watch Widespread Panic’s “Burning Down The House” With Singer & Horn Sections On New Year’s Eve [Pro-Shot]

first_imgWith Widespread Panic decreeing 2017 to be a lighter year for their touring schedule, we’re left with some fond memories of performances throughout 2016. Among those many highlights of last year was the band’s New Year’s Eve celebration at the Bridgestone Arena in Nashville, TN. The band went all out for the performance, calling on a full string section, horn section, and backup vocalist section throughout the three sets of music.The show closed out with a triumphant cover of Talking Heads’ “Burning Down The House,” complete with the McCrary Sisters on vocals, and the Megablasters horn section with saxophonist Randall Bramblett as well! Fortunately for us, WSP has shared some pro-shot footage of their last song played, which you can watch in the embed below.Widespread Panic is off the road until April, when they’re scheduled to perform at festivals like SweetWater 420 and Wanee. You can check out the full New Year’s setlist, below.Setlist: Widespread Panic | Bridgestone Arena | Nashville, TN | 12/31/16Set 1: Blue Indian, Holden Oversoul, May Your Glass Be Filled*, Her Dance Needs No Body*, Crazy*, Still Crazy After All These Years*^, Expiration Day* (44 mins)Set 2: Pigeons, Henry Parsons Died, Rebirtha, Sharon+, Tail Dragger+, Tall Boy+, Can’t Get High#, Ain’t Life Grand%# (57 mins)Set 3: Disco, A Little Help From My Friends+#^, Hope In A Hopeless World+#^, Up All Night+#^ > Moondance+#^, Bust It Big+#^ > Drums > Chilly Water, All Time Low#, Red Hot Mama+#^ (75 mins)Encore: For What It’s Worth#, Burning Down The House+#^Notes:* w/ Love Sponge String Quartet^ w/ Randall Bramblett on sax+ w/ the Megablasters on horns# w/ the McCrary Sisters on vocals% w/ David Davidson on fiddle[JB seated 1st set; House music is that of musicians that have passed this year; ‘Still Crazy After All These Years’ first time played (Paul Simon); ‘Moondance’ LTP 12/31/09 Atlanta (473 shows); ‘A Little Help From My Friends’ LTP 12/31/14 Charlotte (147 shows); ‘Burning Down The House’ LTP 12/31/13 Atlanta (220 shows)]last_img read more

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PREMIERE: Miami’s Lemon City Trio Ripens With Debut “Welcome to the Neighborhood” EP

first_imgHailing from Miami, Florida, Lemon City Trio brings a fresh new taste to the contemporary moment of funk music, offering an impressive level of sophistication worthy of appreciation. The band honed its sound through monthly residencies at one of Miami’s best live music venues Lagniappe House and used the space as a platform to create a sound that is infectiously unique.Lemon City refers to a historical area of Miami, where the band’s rehearsal studio is located in Little Haiti. It is also where the inspiration for the songwriting process takes place. With Brian Robertson on organ, Nick Tannura on guitar, and Aaron Glueckauf on drums, the trio brings the cultural influences of their surroundings and puts them forth in a smooth, boundless, self-created territory.Lemon City Trio’s debut EP Welcome to the Neighborhood takes listeners on a journey through a wide variety of musical styles and diverse textures. From the hip-hop edge in “Jawn” to the laid-back New Orleans-influenced “Don’t Vibe Me (Billy),” the Lemon City Trio demonstrates their broad range of influences and taste in this record. It is a band born from the love of traditional organ trio music, that seeks to pick up the torch and take it to new places.Listen to Welcome to the Neighborhood below:Says Adam Scone of LCT, “The Lemon City Trio is propelling the traditional Organ trio format into new directions. They encompass the sound and feel of the city of Miami. I have been a giant fan since the first time I heard them.” Fellow collaborator Matt Scofield adds, “The Lemon City Trio is one of my favorite Miami bands. Soulful and funky, they’re upholding the long tradition of the classical groove organ trios, and at the same time sounding completely fresh, modern, and energetic.”Friends in Electric Kif also describe LCT as “musical peers” and “important contributors to whats happening in town. They are a killer band that we enjoy exchanging musical ideas with.”Check out some choice videos from the Lemon City Trio’s recent work, and keep up with the band on their Facebook page! The Lemon City Trio will be opening up for Eric Krasno Band at The Funky Biscuit on Thursday, March 30 in Boca Raton, FL. Tickets available here.last_img read more

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Soulive Adds George Porter Jr., Marcus King, Shady Horns To Bowlive Night Seven

first_imgAs anticipation continues to mount for the return of Soulive‘s 8-night “Bowlive” Brooklyn Bowl residency this summer, the band has announced The Meters’ singer/bassist George Porter Jr., guitar phenom Marcus King, and Lettuce’s Shady Horns as the special guests for the penultimate show of the residency on June 16th.For years, the instrumental jazz/funk fusion trio held down an annual spot at the Brooklyn Bowl for an extended residency, bringing in different artists on each night of the run to collaborate with Soulive’s Eric Krasno, Neal Evans, and Alan Evans. After taking a year off from that tradition last year, Soulive announced the triumphant return of this cherished New York music scene tradition in 2017. Unlike past Bowlives, which were held in March, this run will take place throughout the month of June, broken into two consecutive 4-night stands: June 7th – 10th, and June 14th – 17th. The band has already announced their special guests for June 7th (Karl Denson & Steve Kimock), June 8th (Doyle Bramhall II), June 14th (GRiZ, Son Little, & The Shady Horns), and June 15th (John Scofield & The Shady Horns). The remaining three nights’ guests are slated to be announced in the coming week.You can buy tickets to the June 16th show with George Porter Jr., Marcus King, and the Shady Horns here.[Photo credit: Bill McAlaine (Porter); Emily Butler (King)]last_img read more

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