Two students to engage in mock debate tonight

first_img “It is important to stay on the message,” Newman said. “One of the hardest things about these debates is being able to disseminate so much information and put it in a clear form students can understand.” “My primary goal is to articulate Mitt Romney’s previous experience and vision for America’s future, and how these make him the best choice to be our president on January 20,” he said. “I would love to see us have a real hand in the 2012 election,” she said. “We have the potential to be a voting body that they didn’t expect to come out on voting day. It’s going to be a close race, it’s all about who comes out.” Although Newman did not expect to be the sole Democratic debater when he volunteered to participate, he said he is looking forward to taking the stage. In preparation, he has memorized both opening and closing statements, as well as several talking points for “everything they could throw at” him. After college students greatly influenced the 2008 election, Ritger said she would love to see next month’s election mimic that. Senior Mickey Gardella, president of the College Republicans, said he has spent copious amounts of time researching in preparation for the debate. Ritger hopes the debate and vote will encourage students to participate in the actual presidential election on Nov. 6. “This president is going to be the president that we go into the workforce with,” she said. “We will all graduate in the next four years and it’s their policies that will really determine what percentage of our class is going to get jobs.” Senior Adam Newman, a member of the College Democrats, will argue on behalf of President Obama at tonight’s event. Leading up to the debate, students can vote in a mock presidential election, which is sponsored every four years by “Scholastic” and NDTV. Voting will take place between 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. in the LaFortune Student Center, and from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. in McKenna Hall. Each participant will be given two minutes at the beginning of each segment for an opening statement, and the remaining 11 minutes will allow for debate. The vote aims to teach students about the process of voting in an election, Ritger said. For example, although voting is anonymous, students are required to show a student ID, much like how several states are now requiring voter identification.center_img Gardella, who has been involved in political debates before, said he is eagerly anticipating this evening’s event as well. “The mock election is really well-received,” Ritger said. “It’s really easy, it’s low-cost, it’s very fast to go and do. Students are pretty enthusiastic about it because they want to see how their fellow students vote.” “I think students do really at heart want to be able to participate in this election,” she said. “This is, for everyone, the first presidential election they can vote in, and this will just help them become more informed.” The ballot will include a candidate from College Libertarians, which chose not to present a debater. “What we’re trying to do with the last question is for the two students … to really persuade the audience about why they feel strongly about each of their respective candidates,” Ritger said. “We’re really trying to focus on the issues as they relate to college students and why one candidate or the other better represents college students’ interests.” At 8 p.m. tonight in McKenna Hall Auditorium, one representative from College Republicans and one from College Democrats will argue their views in a mock debate, each in an attempt to convince the audience why their respective candidates would be the best choice for college students. The 90-minute debate will spend 15 minutes on each of six key topics that include jobs, debt, healthcare, religion, foreign policy and why a college student should vote for a certain candidate. “I’m a huge politics guy, and I’m really engaged in this election,” he said. “I know President Obama’s vision is the vision I support in this election. Anything I can do to help make sure the Notre Dame student body is involved is something important to me.” Only two days after the presidential candidates squared off against each other for the last time before Election Day, two students with opposing political views will face each other in a similar fashion. “Scholastic” Editor-in-Chief Clara Ritger, who will moderate the debate, said the event hopes to generate excitement for the election and increase awareness of current important issues.last_img read more

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Candidates reflect on election experience

first_imgA six-ticket race was whittled down to two potential platforms to represent the Notre Dame student body when Wednesday’s election resulted in a runoff between juniors Alex Coccia and Nancy Joyce and juniors Dominic Romeo and Philip Hootsmans. Following last night’s runoff debate, Coccia said he and Joyce plan to go into today’s election with the momentum gathered from student support for their ticket. “We have really been honored by the excitement and enthusiasm behind our campaign,” Coccia said. “Going door-to-door in the dorms has really opened our eyes to the breadth and depth of interests within the student body, and we would be very excited to turn those ideas into action once within student government.” As part of one of the two tickets involved in the runoff election, Romeo said he and Hootsmans will continue to advocate for a more representative student government by promoting their vision to the student body. “Since the beginning of this process, Phil and I have believed that our platform and ideals align with what our Notre Dame student body wants: a student government that represents our collective desires and advocates for our collective needs,” Romeo said. “To make it into the runoff … means that our student body not only agrees with such a vision but believes that we have the capacity to make such a vision a reality.” For the candidates who missed the runoff election, the results represented the culmination of concerted campaign efforts. After campaigning on the strength of their five combined years of student government experience, junior Michael Masi and sophomore Tim Scanlan said they were honored to have had the opportunity to promote their vision for the Notre Dame family throughout the election process. “It is a humbling experience to have represented the Notre Dame family in this election. Words cannot express how much inspiration students, family and friends have provided me throughout my time at Notre Dame,” Masi said. As students voting in today’s election, Masi said he and Scanlan believe the Romeo-Hootsmans ticket emphasizes values common with those espoused by their own platform. “It is my belief that the Romeo-Hootsmans ticket best shares the vision and ideals Tim and I set out for student government,” Masi said. “Their willingness to listen to students, work with others and unite the Notre Dame family together as one is truly admirable.” Despite an outcome not in their favor, sophomores Billy Christy and Pat Roemer said the election demonstrated the commitment of their supporters to campaign on their behalf. “It’s meant a lot to both of us that we have so many friends willing to sacrifice their time and go out of their ways to help us,” Christy said. “We’re really humbled that hundreds of people thought that we were the guys for the job and could not be prouder of everyone’s work.” Moving forward, Christy said he and Roemer support Romeo and Hootsmans to lead the Notre Dame student body next year. For freshmen Austin O’Brien and Nick Boggess, their candidacy shows promise for the future of student government at Notre Dame. “Although I will not have the opportunity to serve in student government as president, I am hopeful that I will be able to serve in another capacity,” O’Brien said. After progressing through the election process, O’Brien said he “fully endorses” Coccia and Joyce in today’s election. “Alex is an approachable, strong leader who has experience uniting the campus while fighting for student rights,” he said. In the wake of allegations of election violations against other tickets, freshmen Kevin Salat and Paul Mascarenhas said the outcome of the election leaves them with one voting option in the runoff election. “Our endorsement can only go to one position in this runoff election due to the way things turned out, and that’s to the ‘abstain’ vote,” Salat said. “We refuse to support any candidates that allegedly violated campaign rules and do not want to advocate supporting student government in any way.” Runoff election voting will be open via email today from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.last_img read more

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Zeiss to compete in ‘Jewish Olympics’

first_imgWhen sophomore fencer Maddie Zeiss participates in the Maccabiah games in Tel Aviv, Israel, in July, she will represent Notre Dame to the Jewish community. “It’s for all Jewish athletes, and they have over 30 sports, and you’re selected to be on one of the sports teams,” Zeiss said. “And you … spend a week [touring] Israel, … and then the second week is the week of competition.” The Maccabiah is the world’s largest Jewish athletic competition that emphasizes the centrality of the State of Israel in the life of the Jewish people, according to the Maccabiah website. The games take place every four years and are often called “the Jewish Olympics.” Zeiss, a foil, said she will participate in the open division, in which athletes of any age may participate. She will compete on a team with two other female Americans: a student at Northwestern University and a high school student from New York. Zeiss applied for the opportunity to compete and was selected because of her No. 5 ranking on USA Fencing’s senior points list. Zeiss also earned a bronze medal in this year’s NCAA championships and has earned All-American honors for the past two years. Before the games, Zeiss will continue to train as she does during the school year. “Usually, over the summer, people take fencing a lot lighter because they’re not in season, but I need to just … keep training,” Zeiss said. “[But] I think [Maccabiah is] more about the cultural experience than the actual training, although both are important.” Before the competition, the athletes will visit scenic locations and places significant to the Jewish faith, Zeiss said. “Even though I was raised Jewish, I was never a very religious person,” she said. “So even though I am Jewish, I don’t really know a lot about the religion.” For this reason, Zeiss said she looks forward to learning more about her religion while in Israel. Although her Jewish faith puts her in a minority category at Notre Dame, Zeiss said she does not feel like Catholicism has been forced upon her here. “My first time at Notre Dame, I was definitely a little bit hesitant,” she said. “But since I’ve been here, it’s been extremely accepting. I’ve never been pressured into becoming Catholic or learning more about Catholicism. … I think the opportunity to be around the Catholic religion has been amazing, but it also hasn’t been a situation where I’ve been pressured or anything.” Zeiss said she chose to attend Notre Dame because she liked the fencing program and the University as a whole.   “The religion aspect never got in the way of my education,” she said. “It was just something that was in the back of my mind. … It isn’t prominent if you don’t want it to be, and I really like that it gives you options.” Zeiss said she anticipates Maccabiah will be “eye-opening” and make her interested in finding new ways to practice her Jewish faith while at Notre Dame. But she does not know what awaits her halfway around the world. “I really don’t know what to expect but I’m super curious to find out and I think it should be really awesome,” she said. Contact Marisa Iati at [email protected]last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s screens civil rights documentary

first_imgThe documentary “The Loving Story” played Tuesday night in the Vander Vennet Theatre at Saint Mary’s as part of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemoration and Celebration Week.The film features real footage of the interracial couple that challenged a Virginia law in a battle to legalize interracial marriage in the 1960s.“The Loving Story” chronicles the trial of Richard and Mildred Loving, an interracial couple. Their case made it to the Supreme Court, and a unanimous vote made interracial marriage legal throughout the United States.Jamie Wagman, assistant professor of History and Gender and Women’s studies, said even though the marriage was against Virginia law, it was not unique.“In American history, every kind of union that could have happened in American history, happened,” Wagman said. “Black folks married white folks. Native Americans had relationships with black folks and white folks throughout time.“So any kind of union that you could imagine, did happen. It was at specific moments in history in time these relationships began being examined, when people felt threatened.”Mildred Loving’s relationship with the Civil Rights Movement intrigued Dionne Bremyer, professor of English. Loving did not have a strong political affiliation, and it became a more personal question for her, Bremyer said.“That is what is so interesting about a case like this, because it is very personal who you love and decide to share your life with,” she said. “It didn’t necessarily make her a political figure, even though she does become one. It wasn’t necessarily about the politics so much as it was about real life.“And I think that what is interesting about civil rights cases is very often they are just about people wanting to live their lives a certain way and that has very little to do with the large-scale political ramifications.”Dionne Bremyer’s husband, Aaron Bremyer, director of the Writing Center, said Loving was nevertheless aware of what her and her husband’s efforts meant for the country more broadly.“She seemed to recognize or come to recognize this as something important,” Aaron said. “‘We just want to love each other and go about our lives, but this would also be good for other people.’ There’s some consciousness of the larger issues at stake.”The Bremyers, themselves an interracial couple, said they are fortunate that couples like the Lovings have gone before and that their families accept them fully, Aaron said.“We are very fortunate to have family,” he said. “It would be naive to act like we are not aware of other people’s reactions, because other people are aware of it and comment on it.”Aaron said his experience has been positive, which he tries to keep in the proper perspective.“I think I’ve had it pretty easy, so I am grateful for that but also try to be aware of that all the time and raise consciousness and awareness,” he said. “To help people who struggle for a host of reasons — you know, issues of race, sexuality, class, whatever it may be.”Dionne said she has noticed strange reactions but little animosity, when she and her husband interact with other people.“People have been really good about it for the most part. We have people who stare occasionally, or thank us or say they voted for Obama, which I don’t know why that has to do with anything,” she said. “People will say odd things. It’s strange how people will react to us.”The student group Sisters of Nefertiti sponsored the screening of “The Loving Story.” Tags: Civil Rights, Interracial Marriage, Martin Luther King Jr., saint mary’s, Sisters of Nefertiti, The Loving Storylast_img read more

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Students, faculty attend conference in D.C.

first_imgA group of nine Notre Dame students and staff took part in the 2014 Catholic Social Ministry Gathering (CSMG) earlier this week, taking the opportunity to exercise both their faith and their interest in American government and meet others doing the same. Photo courtesy of Bill Purcell Notre Dame has sent students to the annual conference for the past 10 years, and for nine of those years the group has been led by Professor Bill Purcell, associate director for Catholic Social Tradition and Practice at the Center for Social Concerns.Purcell said he brings students to the conference each year in order to inspire them to be more involved and seek to better the world around them.“For me it’s a way to open students up to opportunities and a way to engage faith in vocation. I get to put the question to them ‘How are we going to change systems?’” Purcell said.About 20 percent of the attendees at the CSMG conference, which began Sunday and ended Wednesday, were from Catholic colleges and universities. In all 26 schools sent delegations of students, faculty and staff.Each year the conference focuses on four policy issues, two domestic and two international, and this year the topics were the minimum wage, prisons, foreign relations in the Middle East and immigration, Purcell said. The conference featured several keynote speakers, policy workshops and meetings with representatives on Capitol Hill.Sophomore Ethan Muehlstein said the best part of the experience for him was hearing from the speakers.“[The speakers] urged us to live out the gospel Pope Francis is trying to teach to us in his homilies and in the way he acts,” he said. “My favorite part of the conference was hearing a speech from [Cardinal Theodore McCarrick]. He was talking about how we don’t have to be perfect humans or great orators to make a difference. We just have to do the best we can at something we love with our whole hearts.”Sophomore Kaitlyn Kennedy said she relished the chance to meet with Congress members from Indiana.“I felt like an empowered citizen visiting with both Indiana senators and Representative Walorski,” Kennedy said. “It was nerve-wracking to speak to them on these controversial and complex issues, but we felt confident knowing that we were not there in our own interest and that the words we were speaking were truth.”It was significant that the group was able to meet with Senator Donnelly, Senator Coats and Rep. Walorski and get a sympathetic hearing from the lawmakers, Muehlstein said.“Some other groups were only able to meet with chiefs of staff, so it was good we were able to meet with the people who actually make the laws and vote,” Muehlstein said. “I felt they were open to what we were telling them.”The group was able to meet with the legislators themselves because Purcell began working to arrange the meetings in October, he said. He said the reason he makes such an effort is the importance for the students of having that experience.“The best understanding of civics comes from being engaged in it,” he said. “Being on Capitol Hill can’t be replicated here in South Bend.”All four of the undergraduate students in the group were sophomores, and every year the group includes sophomores because the students have time to act on their experience when they return and become leaders on campus, Purcell said.“The reason I bring sophomores is for leadership development,” he said. “I think it’s a transformative experience for them.“The students appreciate learning about faith and advocacy, and that faith and politics don’t have to be separate. [Attending the conference] helps them get a national and an international perspective on social concerns.”Muehlstein said the conference helped him to understand why he was interested in social justice and motivated him to become even more involved.“I’ve always had a passion for social justice, so this was a great opportunity to get to the theory behind why I do what I do,” Muehlstein said. “Another student and I are now hoping to get involved in the local juvenile detention center, sharing our ministry with them so they don’t feel forgotten or alone.”Kennedy said her experience allowed her to move beyond what she was already learning about Catholic social values in the classroom.“As a Catholic Social Tradition Minor, I have studied about what it means to live the Gospel social values in class, but this conference introduced me to people whose lives have been transformed by these values, and gave me a way to advocate for these values to be upheld in our nation.”Purcell said the conference is organized by 16 different Catholic organizations, with the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) as the primary sponsor. Tags: catholic social tradition, Center for Social Concerns, conference, CSMG, Governmentlast_img read more

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Spin-A-Thon to raise breast cancer awareness

first_imgPhoto courtesy of RecSports Students pedal away at the 2014 Spin-A-Thon. This year, the 24-hour event will feature a spin class and other activities.From 12 p.m. today to 12 p.m. Saturday, students and members of the South Bend community will cycle at studios located at the Rockne Memorial Gymnasium and Knollwood Country Club in Granger to raise funds and awareness for breast cancer during the annual Pink Zone Spin-A-Thon.Sharla Lewis, special events coordinator for the Notre Dame women’s basketball program, said the women’s basketball team, RecSports and College of Science co-host a Spin-A-Thon each year to support the Pink Zone initiative.“The Women’s Basketball Coaches’ Association began the Pink Zone initiative, formerly known as ‘Think Pink,’ in 2007 by challenging the top-20 women’s basketball programs to try to collect the most money for breast cancer research and treatment, while simultaneously bringing awareness to this deadly disease,” Lewis said. “It’s no longer a challenge among the top programs, but we continue to participate in the initiatives.”Gregory Crawford, dean of the College of Science, said Notre Dame’s fundraisers are unique because a large portion of funds raised are used to support local cancer patients.“We have raised more than $150,000 to help women in the community who cannot afford mammograms receive them,” Crawford said. “Fighting cancer is a large part of the College’s research effort, including the excellent work underway at the Harper Cancer Research Institute. While we are passionate about finding treatments and cures for cancer, we also fight cancer by helping people in our community this way.”Lewis said 20 percent of donations are given to the Kay Yow Cancer Fund. The other 80 percent are given to Saint Joseph Regional Medical Center and River Bend Cancer Services.“Our goal every year is to continue to raise breast cancer awareness on campus and in the community,” Lewis said. “Through our efforts, we are able to help someone that may not have the financial means to get the treatment and support they need.”Tabbitha Ashford, fitness and instruction coordinator for RecSports, said the objective for this year’s event is to fill all 20 bikes in the cycling studio at the Rockne Memorial Gymnasium for all 24 hours of the event.“The more people we get to come out, the more money and support we raise for breast cancer,” Ashford said. “Ideally, for all 24 hours our entire studio will be full.”Crawford said the participating groups’ fundraising goal for the event is $30,000.“Through the event, we also hope to bring people together to focus on the needs of those in our own community,” he said.For a $10 donation, participants in the Spin-A-Thon receive a t-shirt and water bottle. The event will provide participants with food and chances to win prizes. Participants can sign up and donate online or on the day of the event. Additionally, each hour of the event will feature a different theme.“One hour might be an actual cycling class, while another might just consist of watching a movie or playing a game,” Ashford said. “It’s as intense and interactive as you want it to be.”Ashford said the Spin-A-Thon is a great example of the Notre Dame community’s dedication to service to those in need.“A lot of dorms or club sports teams sign up to cycle together,” Ashford said. “It’s awesome to see such a large turnout from our own student population.”Crawford said the event is a good way for Notre Dame to connect with the greater South Bend community.“The unity and commitment of our partners both on campus and beyond are an inspiration to everyone as we seek to solve problems and serve the well-being of others,” he said.Tags: College of Science, Gregory Crawford, Pink Zone, RecSports, Sharla Lewis, Spin-A-Thon, Tabbitha Ashford, women’s basketballlast_img read more

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Chimamanda Adichie delivers message of empowerment

first_imgThough she was just a young girl at the time, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie remembers her home economics teacher asking her “How could you not like needlework? Aren’t you a girl?” Such experiences with sexism only motivate the distinguished author to resist injustice and express her worldviews through writing, she said in a lecture at Saint Mary’s on Thursday night.College president Carol Ann Mooney said Adichie serves as an example for students through her ability to inspire her readers and convey a message of hope.“Her work echoes our mission to empower women and help them develop the compassion and empathy needed to make a difference in the world,” Mooney said.Adichie said she composed her first book at age ten in her childhood home in Nigeria, a place that still serves as a central part of her creativity.“Before [my family] moved into number 305 Margaret Cartwright Avenue, Chinua Achebe and his family lived there,” Adichie said. “I realize now what an interesting coincidence it is that I grew up in a house previously occupied by the writer whose work is most important to me. There must have been literary spirits in the bathroom upstairs … I often got story ideas after taking bucket baths in the bathroom upstairs.”Adichie said she grew up surrounded by the effects a war that ensued from the establishment of Biafra, a short-lived country comprised of Nigerians who attempted to secede.“I knew vaguely about the war as a child, that my grandfathers had died, that my parents lost everything they owned,” Adichie said. “I was aware of how this war haunted my family, how it colored the paths our lives had taken.”Her mother suffered the harrowing implications of this conflict, she said.“[My mother] spoke about making toast and scrambled eggs for her two little daughters before the war to standing in line and fighting for dried egg yolk at the Catholic Relief Center,” Adichie said. “If anything, learning about the war left me with a great respect for a generation who had the courage to believe so fervently in something.”Knowledge of the war and endurance of its permanent consequences inspired Adichie to write a novel, “Half of a Yellow Sun.”“I was aware that the book, would in the end, share my worldview,” Adichie said. “It would be a book that was concerned with the ordinary person.”Adichie said the response to this novel shocked her, for many people embraced its message and related it to their personal experiences.“At my readings, particularly in Nigeria, women would start to cry and to say thank you for telling the story and for finally making it possible to tell their families what they had gone through,” Adichie said. “Men would get choked up talking about how they had been conscripted as boys. Young people born after the war would get emotional talking about how they finally understood their parents, who had experienced and been affected by the war.”Some readers who had not even lived in Nigeria at the time of the war still praised Adichie for her ability to transform their hearts, she said.“An American woman told me, and I will never forget this, that ‘Half of a Yellow Sun’ was the reason she decided to start to identify herself as a pacifist,” Adichie said.According to Adichie, her feminist ideals serve as an important component of her writing, for she was taught to embrace male attention and to aim to marry a rich Nigerian man.“To be feminist is to actively unlearn many of the things I was taught,” Adichie said. “I wanted to dream for myself.”She said she witnessed women forsaking their ambitions, which contributed to her quest for gender equality.“I knew of so many women around me who had given up what they wanted to do or what they wanted to be because of husbands or children, and it made me wonder ‘What if fewer women had suspended their dreams? What would the world be like?’ Adichie said. “For me, to be feminist is not merely to criticize, but to suggest alternatives.”When Adichie moved from Nigeria to the United States at age 19, she noticed that US women receive much more judgment on their appearances.“There is no part of the world today where men and women are totally equal, and that is a grave shame,” Adichie said.She said she remembers encountering a young woman who attributed her feminism to Adichie after identifying with Adichie’s lines in “Flawless” by Beyoncé.“I asked her what it meant to be feminist, and she said that every day she would wake up and say to herself ‘I woke up like this,’” Adichie said. “Hearing her say that made me really start to think seriously about what it means to be feminist for young women today. What does it mean to say ‘I woke up like this, flawless?’ I like to think that it doesn’t actually mean that you’re without flaws, because God forbid that a human being would be perfect.“To be without flaws would be inhuman. I like to think that for feminists, flawless means that you accept yourself the way you are, that flawless, in the feminist sense, really means a radical self-acceptance and the firm knowledge that beauty never means one thing.”Adichie said she is grateful for the opportunity to express her beliefs, such as her feminist principles, through writing.“I write because I cannot imagine my life without the ability to write or to imagine or to dream,” Adichie said. “I write because I have to.”Tags: Chimamanda Adichie, Feminism, Half of a Yellow Sunlast_img read more

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Professor examines development of 1940s fashion

first_imgTags: Fashion, Linda Pryzbyszewski, World War II On Wednesday evening associate professor of history Linda Przybyszewski presented a comprehensive history of the dramatic changes in American fashion during the 1940s and entering the 1950s in her lecture titled “Forties Fashion: Devil in a Blue Dress and Pink Overalls.” With World War II efforts in full force in 1943, both men and women’s dress shifted, adapting to complement both the war’s nationalistic message as well as complying with the necessity to reduce fabric, she said. Men’s fashion in particular focused intently on uniforms, Przybyszewski said, showing an appreciation for and dedication to military dress and therefore the U.S. wartime spirit.“The military tried to recruit people and having the American flag, or the colors of the flag, in clothing became extremely important,” she said.According to Pryzbyszewski, contrasting with this militaristic state of mind, the “zoot suit” also became popularized as an impractical, yet fun fashion statement for many men during the 1940s.“The zoot suit takes up an enormous amount of fabric, comprising of a big oversized jacket that reaches the thighs, trousers wide at the knees, and an oversized hat,” she said.According to L85, the clothing fabric restrictions law passed during World War II, however, much of what comprised of the zoot suit was banned, Przybyszewski said. Many young Mexican Americans continued to sport this trend in California, however, creating a great deal of tension between the “zoot suiters” and servicemen.“There were a series of riots in 1943 called the Zoot Suit Riots, where servicemen attacked ‘zoot suiters,’” she said.The servicemen arrested Mexican Americans and questioned them as potential Nazis, transforming the zoot suits into a disreputable target for discriminatory harassment.The Women Army Corps, known as the WACs, came to a forefront in 1943, participating in the war effort in every way possible, except as armed combatants.The WACs “did everything from office work to driving to various training programs, but women, more than anything else, worked in various factories” Przybyszewski said.Pryzbyszewski said women’s uniforms, therefore, also became a focus of fashion trends, highlighting either khaki trousers or skirts. Turbans and hair clothes began to grow in popularity as well, as women could not wear their hair loose while working in factories.“Factory work did not make pants more popular with women,” she said.“Retailers discovered that in areas where women typically worked in factories, wearing more overalls and trousers, stores sold more dresses.”Evening gowns and beautiful dresses reminded women of a better time, before the war began and wearing fine clothing allowed many women to escape from thoughts of war, Pryzbyszewski said.As an incentive to save fabric with L85, women were asked to sew and conserve fabric simultaneously. With the motto “make do and mend,” many booklets were published in order to teach women how to use spare materials to create new outfits, Pryzbyszewski said.“Women learned how to make skirts out of old pairs of trousers, use three old dresses to make two new ones, and booklets such as ‘200 Ways to Alter a Dress’ were sold,” she said.According to Pryzbyszewski, many different types of skirts and suits emerged as approved wartime outfits for women, including the “tailored day dress,” the “summer suit,” and the “bow-trimmed dress.” Each outfit consisted of traditional styles with simplified details.“The tailored day dress snapped, rather than zipped, along the sides, and consisted of a shirt waist, rather than full body buttons,” she said.  “Only the fronts of the dresses were pleated.”In 1947, however, women’s fashion dramatically shifted when Chirstian Dior’s “Ladies Home Journal” showcased women sporting longer dresses with ornate details, Pryzbyszewski said. After the war, “Dior claimed that he wanted to ‘turn women back into flowers,’” she said.Pryzbyszewski said women embraced this postwar style, adding ruffles, flairs, and inches to their short skirts in order to conform to seemingly backwards fashion trends.Ultimately, World War II and postwar era fashion focused on novelty and dreams. “A need to escape the all-encompassing world wars served as the driving force behind popular fashion in the 1940’s,” she said.last_img read more

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Professor discusses human trafficking in Europe

first_imgSiobhán Mullally, visiting professor from the National University of Ireland, Galway, discussed global human trafficking in a lecture Monday sponsored by the Klau Center for Civil and Human Rights and the Keough-Naughton Institute for Irish Studies. In her first-ever visit to Notre Dame, Mullally explained legal and policy initiatives to the European issue of trafficking in human beings to students and faculty.Mullally serves as a human rights law professor and the director of the Irish Centre for Human Rights at the National University of Ireland, Galway. She opened her lecture by explaining the United Nations Global Compact and current sustainable development goals with international trafficking law.“Although it is a non-legally binding instrument, five countries — including the United States — voted against it,” Mullally said.Developments with international law on human trafficking dates back to 1904, Mullally said. She broke down trafficking in human beings into three parts: act, means and purpose.“The main focus has been on sexual exploitation,” Mullally said.Much of the international level of debate on the subjects of criminalization and human trafficking has revolved around sexual exploitation, she continued.“What is getting lost sometimes are the issues of labor exploitation, domestic servitude and broader areas where trafficking can occur,” Mullally said. Emma Farnan | The Observer Irish professor Siobhan Mullally discussed human trafficking in Europe in a lecture Monday.Mullally spoke at length about The Group of Experts on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings, or GRETA. Mullally currently serves as the president of GRETA, which is the Council of Europe’s anti-trafficking body. Her time with the organization has taken her around the world, examining a number of nations.From France to Italy, Mullally discussed how a number of European countries are being reported upon and monitored for human rights violations.“It’s quite a challenging time at the moment,” Mullally said.Issues outlined by GRETA recently involved a crisis of protection with children from human trafficking in Europe.“There have been gaps found in child monitoring,” Mullally said.Mullally mentioned border concerns in countries like Bulgaria and Turkey where “a human rights-based approach is not being implemented.”She also challenged border patrol agents along with social workers in Europe and around the world to combat the issue of human trafficking.“It’s up to agents of the state acting in different situations to identify people as victims of trafficking and to refer them to a formal identification process of protection and assistance,” Mullally said.She attributed shortcomings in these situations as a reluctance to recognize an individual as a victim of trafficking. Subtle forms of coercion exist in many places, Mullally said. From agricultural farms to military groups, improper monitoring may spawn trafficking in any situation.“I think more recently [government focus has] become about how to control migration,” Mullally said. “There’s been a shift away from looking at the risks of exploitation. Victims of exploitation are looking for excuses to jump the immigration cue. Complaints brought forward are not being believed.”Tags: GRETA, human rights, human traffickinglast_img read more

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JHS Battle Of The Classes Supports Prendergast Library

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Pictured: Kristie Bemis (MakerSpace Librarian), Anne Greene (Prendergast Library Executive Director) and JHS graduates, Lexi Salvaggio, Alyssa Holdridge, Brittney Lobb, Courtney Graham and Student Organization Advisor Tony DolceJAMESTOWN — The 41st Jamestown Battle of the Classes raised $2,400 for the James Prendergast Library, and has now raised more than $300,000 for local charities and organizations.“I am so proud of the students this year. It was the first time in 41 years that we were not able to complete our fundraising efforts and have the Battle of the Classes, but they were still able to raise money for a worthy cause in our community,” said JHS Student Organization Advisor Tony Dolce.The annual Battle of the Classes is a competition to see which JHS class can raise the most money for a designated charity over a two-week time. The battle normally culminates in a school wide event with games, sporting competitions and dance-offs to celebrate their achievement. Due to COVID-19, the in-person Battle of the Classes was cancelled.“We know the library isn’t in the best financial shape and it’s such a great place for our community. So many people of all ages use it,” said JHS 2020 graduate and Senior Class President, Lexi Salvaggio. “We are so happy to give our donation to the library to help them continue to provide services to our community.” The library plans to use the funds for their MakerSpace area, which is laid out to encourage visitors of all ages to explore independently. Each day, library staff also plans and implement a daily focus activity that is a more formal discussion of a scientific topic. Daily activities include challenges thatpromote collaboration and critical thinking, where staff encourages children to complete a specific task that relates to a scientific concept (e.g. building a bridge that holds something heavy, identifying an image under a microscope). Any visitor who attempts a challenge receives a free science-themed book.“It’s amazing what the JHS students did for us, even with schools buildings being closed,” said Anne Greene, Jamestown Prendergast Library Executive Director. “We are so proud and pleased that the students did this for us. It is so impressive to see students care so much about their community and we are thrilled to use the funds for our MakerSpace.”last_img read more

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