Sweden to Assist New EU Anti-Piracy Mission

first_img View post tag: EU Sweden to Assist New EU Anti-Piracy Mission View post tag: africa Share this article A new EU anti-piracy mission will soon commence in the Gulf of Aden and off the Somali coast.The Swedish Navy will contribute by assisting in escorting World Food Programme vessels to Somalia, as well as other vessels in need of protection. This will be the fourth initiative since 2009. The mission will see the Netherlands and Sweden working together.In order to start the operation at the beginning of the year, the Navy conducted intensive training to prepare for the mission. Combat vessels and other equipment were loaded aboard the Navy’s largest warship HSwMS Belos and sent to Den Helder, The Netherlands.[mappress mapid=”14879″]Naval Today Staff, Image: Swedish Navy View post tag: New Back to overview,Home naval-today Sweden to Assist New EU Anti-Piracy Mission January 8, 2015 View post tag: Sweden View post tag: europe View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Navy View post tag: Naval View post tag: Anti-Piracy View post tag: Assist Authorities View post tag: Missionlast_img read more

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Disturbance outside popular Baby Love club night

first_imgStudents at Baby Love on Tuesday 2 December witnessed a disturbance outside the club when two individuals were denied entry and allegedly verbally abused revellers.An Oxford undergraduate who was at Baby Love during the incident said, “I saw a crowd of people outside and went to see what was going on. There were two police cars, and one man was handcuffed outside a car and speaking to a police officer. People who’d been outside told me that some men had come from nowhere, started calling everyone in the smoking area ‘faggots’ and lunging at people. With hindsight, it sounds mildly terrifying – at the time most of us were far too smashed to appreciate quite how risky the situation was.”David Mark Dunning, a student at St Benet’s, commented, “I did witness a little of what went on at Baby Love on Tuesday evening/Wednesday morning. I didn’t witness anything in the club but I did hear that there was an incident inside. However, as I was leaving the club I was redirected from the steps at the front of the club and told to leave down the disabled access ramp as just at the bottom of the steps there was parked a police car. The bouncers blocked the way, but I could see two police officers were there, and I watched as they arrested two homophobic people, at least one of which, I was told, had a knife. After having watched the police handcuff the homophobes, I then proceeded to leave with my boyfriend, via the ramp, because I wanted to avoid any possibility of danger.”A spokesperson for Baby Love told Cherwell, “We are aware that 2 residents of Simon House tried to enter the bar and were refused entry by the security on the door. At present we cannot confirm what, (or if anything at all was said), and / or to whom.“Baby Love is sensitive to the fact that Simon House is a long established hostel for the Homeless and other vulnerable people in Oxford. The management is clear that they do not support any antisocial behaviour of any kind from its residents. They are in the process of investigating the incident and are following their strict protocol that governs the behaviour of its residents.“Baby Love is working with the management of Simon House and the Police on this matter.”Baby Love Bar relocated to its current site at the Castle Tavern on Paradise Street earler this year.James Blythe, another Oxford student, commented, “Enjoying the final Baby Love of term fuelled by wonderful LGBTQSoc drinks, I was shocked to encounter homophobic abuse raining down from a neighbouring property. The staff of Babylove were amazing and reacted swiftly, as did the police, but it’s a grim reminder of how much violence LGBTQ people routinely experience in 2014 and from which my privilege generally protects me.”In response to the incident, Chris Pike, OUSU VP for Welfare and Equal Opportunities, commented, “It is very unpleasant to hear that LGBTQ students and locals had to endure this deeply unpleasant behaviour. I am pleased that action was taken quickly to combat the problem, and I hope that Baby Love will continue to act to prevent this behaviour around their venue in future. OUSU will continue to work for LGBTQ students as a community of our university as a top priority, and any students who have had individual problems as a result of their sexuality or gender should feel able to get advice and support from our Student Advice Service.”Thames Valley Police were unavailable for comment.last_img read more

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News story: Secretary of State extends condolences following death of Tom Moran

first_imgCommenting earlier this evening, Mrs Bradley said: Tom Moran was a hugely successful businessman and well-regarded philanthropist and who was a true friend to Northern Ireland. He took an active role behind the scenes in supporting the Belfast Agreement and the Northern Ireland Peace Process over many years. My sincere condolences to his wife and entire family circle at this very sad time.center_img We are indebted to him for his work over the past decades and for his efforts to help bring about a lasting peace for all in Northern Ireland.last_img read more

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Canada Bread reports drop in sales

first_imgCanada Bread has said sales were consistent with its previous trading year figures, despite a 1.8% drop to $1.57bn (£1.03bn).In the company’s financial results for the year ended 31 December 2012, the Canadian-based bakery manufacturer revealed a 2.4% fall in sales to $390.7m (£257.9m) during its fourth-quarter trading.The firm revealed that after adjusting for the closure of its Walsall bakery in the UK, as well as currency translation on sales in the US, Canada Bread saw a 0.4% fall in Q4 sales.As part of the results, Canada Bread said: “Higher prices and volumes in the North American and the UK frozen bakery businesses were offset by lower volumes and unfavourable sales mix in the fresh pasta business. Volumes in the fresh bread business were consistent with last year.”Richard Lan, president of Canada Bread, said: “We delivered solid earnings growth in the quarter, reflecting an intense effort by our team and solid execution on a number of fronts, including cost reduction, innovation and campaigns to engage with consumers. We continue to see significant potential to deliver incremental value. A number of initiatives are planned or under way to further drive profitability in 2013 and beyond.”The frozen bakery division, which includes par-baked bakery products, speciality and artisan breads, and bagels sold to retail, foodservice and convenience market, including its New York Bakery Co brand, experienced a 1.8% decrease in Q4 sales to $135.9m (£89.75m).However, Canada Bread said after adjusting for the Walsall bakery closure and currency translation on sales in both regions, it increased 4.1%, primarily due to stronger volumes as well as higher pricing in the North American business.The company said a 35.3% growth in adjusted operating earnings to $35.4m (£23.4m) were consistent with last year in its UK bakery arm. Its North American fresh and frozen business saw growth partly offset by lower earnings in the fresh pasta business.Canada Bread operates 22 bakeries and employs more than 8,700 members of staff within the US and UK operations. It is 89.8% owned by North American-based Maple Leaf Foods.last_img read more

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Bakkavör sells Vaco

first_imgFresh prepared foods manufacturer the Bakkavör group has agreed the sale of Belgian fresh prepared food business, Vaco, to Culinor Food Group.Culinor Food Group is a producer of fresh prepared ready meals for retail and foodservice operators across Belgium. The sale is expected to complete by early autumn.Agust Gudmundsson, chief executive of Bakkavör, said: “This sale marks further progress for the group as we focus on our core strategic growth markets of the UK, the US and Asia.”Last month Bakkavör announced it plans to create 470 new roles in its deli and desserts businesses.last_img read more

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Goodfella’s Pizza debuts vegan pizza

first_img2 Sisters owned-Goodfella’s Pizza is set to roll-out its first mainstream vegan frozen pizza to tap the increased demand for plant-based products.Available in supermarkets nationwide from April for £2.50, the pizza will be topped with falafel, red peppers, spinach, white onion, harissa sauce and a hummus drizzle.The brand, which is on the verge of being acquired by Nomad Foods for just under £200m, claimed the launch was the first mass-market vegan frozen pizza fully approved by the Vegan Society. “We’re meeting the demand of a huge number of people in the UK who don’t want to eat animal products, and what’s more – it’s really delicious,” said Goodfella’s brand manager Alex Brown.“We think this pizza will appeal to all pizza-lovers. We’ve perfected the recipe and we’re really pleased with the result: flavoursome falafel, delicious veg, and the tastiest hummus drizzle… you’re less than 20 minutes away from a top-notch vegan dinner.”The Goodfella’s vegan pizza is the latest in a number of bakery launches across Veganuary, a month-long celebration of meat- and dairy-free lifestyles.last_img read more

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Governor issues ‘Stay Healthy at Home Mandate’ beginning April 2

first_imgAUGUSTA – Governor Janet Mills issued a series of new mandates in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, including a directive that requires people living in Maine to stay at home at all times unless for an essential job or an essential personal reason, such as obtaining food, medicine, health care or other necessary purposes. The order lasts at least through the month of April.More than 300 Mainers have tested positive for the novel coronavirus, including two Franklin County residents. Those confirmed cases include 43 healthcare workers. Fifty-seven people have been hospitalized and five residents have died, while 68 Mainers have recovered and been released from isolation.“We are in the midst of one of the greatest public health crises this world has seen in more than a century,” Mills said in a statement released Tuesday afternoon. “This virus will continue to sicken people across our state; our cases will only grow, and more people will die. I say this to be direct, to be as honest with you as I can. Because saving lives will depend on us.”Other, new restrictions announced Tuesday include:For essential businesses and operations that remain open, limiting the number of customers in their buildings at any one time, implementing curb-side pickup and delivery options as much as possible, and enforcing U.S. CDC-recommended physical distancing requirements for their customers and employees in and around their facilities.Prohibiting the use of public transportation unless for an essential reason or job that cannot be done from home and limiting the number of people traveling in private vehicles to persons within the immediate household unless transporting for essential activities.Mandating the continued termination of classroom or other in-person instruction until at least May 1, 2020.Mandating that, when out of the home or when at work at an essential business, individuals shall maintain a minimum distance of six feet from other persons.The Executive Order takes effect at 12:01 a.m. on April 2, 2020 and will last until at least April 30, 2020.Mills also extended the closure of restaurants and bars statewide for dine-in customers until at least April 30, 2020 to align with today’s order.Stay Healthy at Home DirectiveThe “Stay Healthy at Home” Executive Order requires that Maine people remain at home unless to leave for an essential job or an essential activity. Essential jobs are defined under Mills’ March 24 Executive Order outlining essential businesses and operations. Essential personal activities include the following with relation to an individual, their family, household members, pets, or livestock:Obtaining necessary supplies for household consumption or use, such as groceries, and supplies and equipment needed to work from home, laundry, and products needed to maintain safety, sanitation, and essential maintenance of the home or residence.Obtaining medication or medical supplies and seeking medical or behavioral health or emergency services.Providing care, including transportation, of oneself, a family member, friend, pet or livestock in another household or location for essential health and safety activities and to obtain necessary supplies and services.Traveling to and from an educational institution for purposes of receiving meals or instructional materials for distance learning.Engaging in outdoor exercise activities, such as walking, hiking, running, or biking, but, only in compliance with the social gathering restriction in Executive Order 14 and all applicable social distancing guidance published by the U.S. and Maine Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.Travel required by a law enforcement officer or court order; andTraveling to and from a federal, State, or local government building for a necessary purpose.Travel RestrictionsThe Order prohibits the use of public transportation unless for an essential reason or job that cannot be done from home and limits the number of people traveling in private vehicles to persons within the immediate household unless transporting for essential personal activities.Termination of In-Person Instruction at SchoolsPublic and private schools and higher education institutions statewide have terminated in-classroom instruction in accordance with the governor’s March 15 recommendation. Mills today ordered that all such schools shall continue to cease classroom or other in-person instruction until at least May 1, 2020, or until further Order.Restricting Number of People in Essential StoresMills’ Executive Order restricts the number of people allowed at essential businesses at any one time, mandates that they conduct as much business as possible by curbside order and pick up or delivery to limit in-person contact, and enforce physical distancing in and around their facilities by prominently posting signs at public entrances and on the floor to notify customers to stay six-feet apart. It also requires that they disinfect the handles of every cart and basket between uses, minimize customer handling of unpurchased merchandise and offer separate operating hours for Maine people over the age of 60 and those with underlying medical conditions.Under the Executive order, essential stores with retail spaces of:Less than 7,500 square feet limit the number of customers in the store at one time to 5. Examples of such stores include gas stations and convenience and specialty food stores.More than 7,500 and less than 25,000 square feet limit the number of customers in the store at one time to 15. Examples of such stores include stand-alone pharmacies and certain hardware stores.More than 25,000 and less than 50,000 square feet limit the number of customers in the store at one time to 50. Examples of such stores include mid-sized and locally owned grocery stores.More than 50,000 and less than 75,000 square feet limit the number of customers in the store at one time to 75. Examples of such stores include chain grocery stores.More than 75,000 square feet limit the number of customers in the store at one time to 100 and install protective shields between customers and checkout clerks as soon as practicable. Examples of such stores include Lowe’s, Wal-Mart, Target and Home Depot.Retailers must enforce these limits and a six-foot separation between any customers waiting in lines. Any essential business which violates this Order will be subject to further on-site restrictions or closure until those violations are addressed. These new requirements adjust and mandate prior recommendations from the Governor regarding essential businesses and operations.PreemptionThe Order preempts any local ordinance or emergency order of the same subject matter that is less restrictive than or otherwise inconsistent with this Order.EnforcementThis Order shall be enforced by law enforcement as necessary and violations are a class E crime subject to up to six months in jail and a $1000 fine. In addition, compliance with Section IV of this Order may also be enforced by government officials who regulate licenses, permits or any other authorization to operate a business or occupy a building. It is the Governor’s hope that compliance will be voluntary, and that formal enforcement will not be necessary.last_img read more

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375th: A look back

first_img 2Peter Girguis, John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Natural Sciences, is an expert in deep sea microbes. An exhibit focusing on his work is displayed at Harvard Museum of Natural History. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 17Emma Beaumont-Smith (from center) and her mother, Natalie Beaumont-Smith (green jacket) of the Office of Work/Life Resources, enter the 2012 Green Carpet Awards inside Sanders Theatre. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer 18Historian Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz explores Harvard University’s relationship with women, which she describes as complicated. Her review begins with the University’s founding 375 years ago, when Harvard excluded women as students and teachers. Charles Rosenberg (from left), Drew Faust, and Horowitz listen during the introductory comments in Radcliffe Gymnasium. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 13Snow falls on the John Harvard Statue while 375th signs decorate Harvard Yard. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer 10Rena Fonseca, director of executive education at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, attends the opening of the Harvard Innovation Lab. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer 8Lizabeth Cohen, Howard Mumford Jones Professor of American Studies and dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, holds a giant knife aloft after cutting the cake during the 375th anniversary celebration in Tercentenary Theatre. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer This academic year, Harvard celebrated the 375th anniversary of the founding of Harvard College in 1636. To mark this milestone, the University launched a yearlong series of programs and activities, beginning with a celebration in Harvard Yard in October. The anniversary year also included a full program of events throughout the year that characterized the lively, intellectual exchanges that flourish at Harvard. These included academic events, lectures, symposia, and exhibits. Harvard also launched a series of initiatives to recognize the University’s enduring legacy, including Harvard Stories, a mobile tour of Harvard Yard, and “Explore Harvard: The Yard and Beyond,” a book of Harvard photography. 4Chef Joanne Chang ’91 assembles the red velvet cake that will serve 4,000 people at Harvard’s 375th celebration in Tercentenary Theatre. Justin Ide/Harvard Staff Photographer 5Harvard students Stephanie Wang ’12 (from left), Kefhira Pintoi ’12, Raafi Alidina ’12, and Alan Montelongo ’12 blow up balloons in preparation for Harvard’s 375th anniversary celebration. Justin Ide/Harvard Staff Photographer 6The veritas shield and 375 logo decorate an ice sculpture inside one of the tents in Tercentenary Theatre as Harvard celebrates its 375th year. Justin Ide/Harvard Staff Photographer 11Harvard Thinks Green: Six professors speak for 10 minutes each about the environment, from the vantage point of their respective fields, at Sanders Theatre. Speakers include Eric Chivian, Rebecca Henderson, Robert Kaplan, Richard Lazarus, James McCarthy, and Christoph Reinhart. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer 12Harvard University President Drew Faust presents “Telling War Stories: Reflections of a Civil War Historian” at the Cambridge Public Library as part of the John Harvard Book Celebration series. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 9Cellist Yo-Yo Ma performs during the 375th celebration of Harvard University. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 3Workers paint 375 on the turf at Harvard Stadium to celebrate the University’s 375th anniversary. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 1Banners hanging in Tercentenary Theatre proclaim Harvard’s 375th anniversary. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer 14Harvard Graduate School of Design student Trude Renwick (pictured) skates on the ice installed in front of Harvard’s Science Center for students and members of the community to enjoy throughout the winter months. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 7Jasdeep Randhawa ’13 (left) and Divya Dhar ’13 (center) are all smiles as they finally get served ice cream after a long wait during Harvard’s 375th anniversary celebration in Tercentenary Theatre. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer 16Henry A. Kissinger, who served as national security adviser and secretary of state during the Nixon and Ford administrations, is a featured speaker in Sanders Theatre as part of the 375th anniversary celebration. Kissinger (from left), Graham Allison, and Drew Faust talk in the green room. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 15Harvard University President Drew Faust presents “Telling War Stories: Reflections of a Civil War Historian” at the Boston Public Library as part of the John Harvard Book Celebration series. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 19Students perform in Agassiz Theatre during a dress rehearsal for the Poetry Project, led by Jorie Graham, to be performed during the Arts First weekend at Harvard University. The students collectively recite a verse by e.e. cummings. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 20Miguel Espejo, from Harvard Custodial Services, uses rainwater to wash Harvard Shuttles decorated with the 375th logo. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographerlast_img read more

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Two students to engage in mock debate tonight

first_img “It is important to stay on the message,” Newman said. “One of the hardest things about these debates is being able to disseminate so much information and put it in a clear form students can understand.” “My primary goal is to articulate Mitt Romney’s previous experience and vision for America’s future, and how these make him the best choice to be our president on January 20,” he said. “I would love to see us have a real hand in the 2012 election,” she said. “We have the potential to be a voting body that they didn’t expect to come out on voting day. It’s going to be a close race, it’s all about who comes out.” Although Newman did not expect to be the sole Democratic debater when he volunteered to participate, he said he is looking forward to taking the stage. In preparation, he has memorized both opening and closing statements, as well as several talking points for “everything they could throw at” him. After college students greatly influenced the 2008 election, Ritger said she would love to see next month’s election mimic that. Senior Mickey Gardella, president of the College Republicans, said he has spent copious amounts of time researching in preparation for the debate. Ritger hopes the debate and vote will encourage students to participate in the actual presidential election on Nov. 6. “This president is going to be the president that we go into the workforce with,” she said. “We will all graduate in the next four years and it’s their policies that will really determine what percentage of our class is going to get jobs.” Senior Adam Newman, a member of the College Democrats, will argue on behalf of President Obama at tonight’s event. Leading up to the debate, students can vote in a mock presidential election, which is sponsored every four years by “Scholastic” and NDTV. Voting will take place between 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. in the LaFortune Student Center, and from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. in McKenna Hall. Each participant will be given two minutes at the beginning of each segment for an opening statement, and the remaining 11 minutes will allow for debate. The vote aims to teach students about the process of voting in an election, Ritger said. For example, although voting is anonymous, students are required to show a student ID, much like how several states are now requiring voter identification.center_img Gardella, who has been involved in political debates before, said he is eagerly anticipating this evening’s event as well. “The mock election is really well-received,” Ritger said. “It’s really easy, it’s low-cost, it’s very fast to go and do. Students are pretty enthusiastic about it because they want to see how their fellow students vote.” “I think students do really at heart want to be able to participate in this election,” she said. “This is, for everyone, the first presidential election they can vote in, and this will just help them become more informed.” The ballot will include a candidate from College Libertarians, which chose not to present a debater. “What we’re trying to do with the last question is for the two students … to really persuade the audience about why they feel strongly about each of their respective candidates,” Ritger said. “We’re really trying to focus on the issues as they relate to college students and why one candidate or the other better represents college students’ interests.” At 8 p.m. tonight in McKenna Hall Auditorium, one representative from College Republicans and one from College Democrats will argue their views in a mock debate, each in an attempt to convince the audience why their respective candidates would be the best choice for college students. The 90-minute debate will spend 15 minutes on each of six key topics that include jobs, debt, healthcare, religion, foreign policy and why a college student should vote for a certain candidate. “I’m a huge politics guy, and I’m really engaged in this election,” he said. “I know President Obama’s vision is the vision I support in this election. Anything I can do to help make sure the Notre Dame student body is involved is something important to me.” Only two days after the presidential candidates squared off against each other for the last time before Election Day, two students with opposing political views will face each other in a similar fashion. “Scholastic” Editor-in-Chief Clara Ritger, who will moderate the debate, said the event hopes to generate excitement for the election and increase awareness of current important issues.last_img read more

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Spin-A-Thon to raise breast cancer awareness

first_imgPhoto courtesy of RecSports Students pedal away at the 2014 Spin-A-Thon. This year, the 24-hour event will feature a spin class and other activities.From 12 p.m. today to 12 p.m. Saturday, students and members of the South Bend community will cycle at studios located at the Rockne Memorial Gymnasium and Knollwood Country Club in Granger to raise funds and awareness for breast cancer during the annual Pink Zone Spin-A-Thon.Sharla Lewis, special events coordinator for the Notre Dame women’s basketball program, said the women’s basketball team, RecSports and College of Science co-host a Spin-A-Thon each year to support the Pink Zone initiative.“The Women’s Basketball Coaches’ Association began the Pink Zone initiative, formerly known as ‘Think Pink,’ in 2007 by challenging the top-20 women’s basketball programs to try to collect the most money for breast cancer research and treatment, while simultaneously bringing awareness to this deadly disease,” Lewis said. “It’s no longer a challenge among the top programs, but we continue to participate in the initiatives.”Gregory Crawford, dean of the College of Science, said Notre Dame’s fundraisers are unique because a large portion of funds raised are used to support local cancer patients.“We have raised more than $150,000 to help women in the community who cannot afford mammograms receive them,” Crawford said. “Fighting cancer is a large part of the College’s research effort, including the excellent work underway at the Harper Cancer Research Institute. While we are passionate about finding treatments and cures for cancer, we also fight cancer by helping people in our community this way.”Lewis said 20 percent of donations are given to the Kay Yow Cancer Fund. The other 80 percent are given to Saint Joseph Regional Medical Center and River Bend Cancer Services.“Our goal every year is to continue to raise breast cancer awareness on campus and in the community,” Lewis said. “Through our efforts, we are able to help someone that may not have the financial means to get the treatment and support they need.”Tabbitha Ashford, fitness and instruction coordinator for RecSports, said the objective for this year’s event is to fill all 20 bikes in the cycling studio at the Rockne Memorial Gymnasium for all 24 hours of the event.“The more people we get to come out, the more money and support we raise for breast cancer,” Ashford said. “Ideally, for all 24 hours our entire studio will be full.”Crawford said the participating groups’ fundraising goal for the event is $30,000.“Through the event, we also hope to bring people together to focus on the needs of those in our own community,” he said.For a $10 donation, participants in the Spin-A-Thon receive a t-shirt and water bottle. The event will provide participants with food and chances to win prizes. Participants can sign up and donate online or on the day of the event. Additionally, each hour of the event will feature a different theme.“One hour might be an actual cycling class, while another might just consist of watching a movie or playing a game,” Ashford said. “It’s as intense and interactive as you want it to be.”Ashford said the Spin-A-Thon is a great example of the Notre Dame community’s dedication to service to those in need.“A lot of dorms or club sports teams sign up to cycle together,” Ashford said. “It’s awesome to see such a large turnout from our own student population.”Crawford said the event is a good way for Notre Dame to connect with the greater South Bend community.“The unity and commitment of our partners both on campus and beyond are an inspiration to everyone as we seek to solve problems and serve the well-being of others,” he said.Tags: College of Science, Gregory Crawford, Pink Zone, RecSports, Sharla Lewis, Spin-A-Thon, Tabbitha Ashford, women’s basketballlast_img read more

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