Part 3: Fail to prepare, prepare to fail

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Our blogger Kevin Eason puts nerves aside to hit the training pitch I slowly get back up as Dave bellowed, “It’s touch rugby, yeah Jack!” Apparently he’d never heard. I later found out it was his first week’s training. It definitely wasn’t his first time playing.Easy mistake to make, I guess!I couldn’t care less to be honest. I wasn’t happy. Everyone else had heard it was touch and my back was still pounding. The next time he gets the ball I’m going to give him what he just gave me. No holding back. It didn’t take long. I was on my toes, head down, steaming towards him with gritted teeth on a revenge mission. Whallop! I bounced backwards and back into the mud. My pride buried. I was being given a rugby reality check.Later on we ran through some moves that went straight over my head. My teammates were really helpful, pointing where I should be, encouraging me when I did something good – like actually catching a ball. They were tiny flashes of light in a dark tunnel I appreciated.After training Dave and the boys invited me to the club bar for beer, which I thought I’d deserved. Soaked through and covered in mud, I shuffled onto a barstool taking it all in.Lucas, the club’s Vice Captain and backs coach told me he saw me as a wing and described what that entailed. Exhausted, and barely able to take it in, I made my excuses and got home for a hot bath!On the drive home, my first impression was that I had a huge amount of respect for anyone who played the game at any level. It’s a tough old sport!Before bed I did a bit of research using Cortana about famous wings, like David Campese, Bryan Habana and Jonah Lomu. Then came the big question. Are there any small wings in rugby? Bingo. Apparently Shane Williams was 5ft 7in, my size and pretty special – which made me feel a lot better.I updated a post on Facebook to shout about my newfound sporting escapades before dropping off. I slept heavily. *Follow Kevin next week on his rugby journey from training to playing his first game!  #therugbybeginner This is a Rugby World advertorial.In the third of a four-part series in conjunction with Windows 10, Rugby World welcomes #therugbybeginner.WEEK THREEIt’s Tuesday. Training day. I’m in and out of meetings but questions keep popping into my head. Would I make a fool of myself? Would they like me…would I like them? Would I break my leg? I decided to write a few sensible pointers down on One Note. Warm-up properly. Focus. Remember your gumshield…don’t look petrified! It seemed to settle me down. I leave work with a spring in my step feeling like I was starting my first day at school.In truth I’m filled with optimism that I’m actually going to pretty good at this rugby lark. Mainly based on the fact that whilst running for the train that evening I darted through crowds like England superstar Jason Robinson in his pomp – in my head, anyway.At home, with my box-fresh training gear on, the nerves started to kick in – like a large size nine straight to the stomach. Oh My God. I’m an idiot! Why am I doing this? Every year at school, without fail, my reports would end with, ‘Kevin needs to think before he acts’. Now at the age of 36, history was repeating itself.With the rain teaming down outside, it was time to go. Next stop Westcliff RFC!On arrival, I walked towards the pitches feeling very much like I was about to walk the plank.First to spot me was Dave Cole, the club captain. He waves and ushers me into a circle of about eight blokes passing a few balls around chatting and laughing about last week’s game.I instantly feel out of my depth. Like a second year student plunged into the fifth year’s PE lesson. I was by far the smallest member of the group and had no idea what anyone was on about. I could hardly even see them as the rain got heavier and the ground grew softer underfoot.All my new teammates said hello and kindly welcomed me to Westcliff RFC. I quickly burbled that I’d never played before – something they were probably guessing judging by my passing skills. Dave called time on the passing and because of the rain and lack of numbers, suggested a quick game of touch before trying out a few ‘ruck drills’ – one to research online later with a bit of help from Cortana.A game of touch rugby, great! I may still keep my nose and be able to walk to the car then. My first touch of a rugby ball was meet by two long arms, a head, neck and quickly followed up by the rest of his 16-odd stone heft as I slammed into the wet mud skidding about ten metres before finally ending up just over the try line without the ball. Ouch.last_img read more

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Zubka offers charities referral income from online recruitment

first_img Tagged with: Digital Recruitment / people Howard Lake | 18 September 2006 | News  20 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Zubka offers charities referral income from online recruitment AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Zubka is a new online recruitment service that is hoping to boost the number of candidates it can source be offering to pay charities a referral fee every time one of their supporters or members successfully recommends a candidate to a new job position.Zubka realise that charities’ databases offer a huge range of potential candidates for their clients seeking to fill vacancies. It is therefore offering partner charities a cut of their income: every time one of their supporters successfully matches a candidate with a vacancy as a result of their recommendation, the charity will receive a percentage of the reward available.Zubka was created by David Shieldhouse, a recruitment specialist with over 20 years’ experience. He believes that matching people and opportunities should be “a rewarding experience for everyone involved” and has set out to build “a service that enables people to benefit from the sharing of intellectual property”. The concept was further developed by business partner Armando Ruffini. Zubka was launched last month. Advertisementlast_img read more

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Lessons of ‘The Hammer & the Hoe: The Alabama Communist Party 1928-1951’

first_imgSharecropper Ned Cobb, a.k.a. Nate Shaw, at 22, with his spouse, Viola, and their son Andrew, in 1907. Cobb was a member of the Alabama Sharecroppers Union, organized by the ACP. The Scottsboro Nine with their lawyer from the International Labor Defense, organized by the CPUSA, around 1932.Women welders in Mobile, Ala., shipyards during the 1940s.An earlier version of this article originally appeared on Dec. 14 in The Forge, a socialist newspaper for the South (theforgenews.org).In 1990, Dr. Robin D.G. Kelley published the phenomenal book “Hammer and Hoe: The Alabama Communist Party 1928-1951,” documenting the 23-year history of the Alabama Communist Party, a chapter of the Communist Party USA. Formed and molded by Black sharecroppers and laborers such as Black revolutionary Hosea Hudson, the ACP went above and beyond fighting for the rights of laborers and workers, Black and white, to the rights to housing, food and equal pay. The eventual dissolution of the ACP was brought on by the Red Scare, the Ku Klux Klan and reactionary politicians in Alabama. But it is important to understand that it took the collective effort of the local and state white supremacist government to bring down the organized party of mainly Black laborers and workers, and that it took over two decades to do. This alone proves the resilience of these revolutionary Southerners.Though initially skeptical of a communist party in the South, the CPUSA, along with other communists all over the United States, eventually had to eat their words. Despite threats often carried out by racist pigs, by 1934 the Alabama Sharecroppers’ Union [SCU]was composed entirely of Black laborers and had a membership of 6,000 people, the largest of any Black union in the South. The SCU was developed and maintained by members of the ACP until its dissolution shortly after 1936, though by that point its membership was at 10,000. Some of the notable victories of the SCU were the raise of wages per 100 pounds of cotton on some plantations in Alabama to 75 cents in 1934 (roughly $13 a day in 2017), as well as the stopping of evictions of Black and white workers who were tenants of petty-bourgeois, racist landlords.Perhaps most notably, the ACP was instrumental in the handling of organization among rank-and-file communists and other workers in defense of the Scottsboro Nine, a case in which nine Black youth — Haywood Patterson, Clarence Norris, Charlie Weems, Andy and Roy Wright, Olin Montgomery, Ozie Powell, Willie Roberson and Eugene Williams — were arrested and falsely accused of sexually assaulting two white women on a train in 1931. It was later revealed that the women were forced by police to testify that the youth had sexually assaulted them or else they would be arrested themselves.An all-white jury found them all guilty and eight were sentenced to death. The ACP and the International Labor Defense, a communist-led legal advocacy organization, rallied behind the youth and spread the word throughout the South and eventually made national headlines. In the end, eight of the nine young men were freed or paroled, all due to the work of the ACP and ILD.Low wages spur organizingThe formation of the ACP could not have come at a better time: In Birmingham, Ala., in 1910, the cost of labor was so cheap that 80 percent of people in Birmingham earned under $500 a year [$13,070 in 2016 dollars], while the 1% made $35,000 a year [$915,655 in 2016 dollars]. This was possible because of the cheap labor of Black workers who were (and still are) paid less than white workers. Even though, in 1910, Black men made up 55 percent of coal miners in Alabama, and 65 percent of ironworkers in Birmingham, Black men were also over 90 percent of Birmingham’s unskilled labor force. By 1920, Black women made up 60 percent of workers, 87 percent of whom were involved in domestic work. By 1930, two years after the formation of the party and one year after the stock market crash, 16,000 Black women worked in domestic services and by 1935, at least 8,000 Black women were registered in the Alabama Employment Services. The wages that Black women made historically were even less than those of Black men, with Black women working longer hours for just $1 or $2 a week, which comes out to $48 or $96 a year [$702 and $1,405 per annum, as of 2016]. At the height of the Great Depression, Black people, especially Black women, made so little money that they often only had enough for rent and ate whatever leftover food that domestic working women could secure from the homes they worked in during the days and nights.A new type of legal slaveryAfter World War I, the price of cotton plummeted, and despite the increasing debt of Black planters and harvesters, who could hardly afford to get by as it was, the available land where cotton was planted and picked was greatly reduced, causing landlords to evict these planters and harvesters off their land with nowhere to go. This allowed white landowners in Alabama, who had, through the long-existing white supremacist system, acquired land, animals, food, seeds and other implementations for their fields, to “lease” land, food, equipment and shelter to anyone looking for work. Since the largest percentage of those unemployed were Black people, that was the largest group that would become workers for the landlords and planters. This essentially became a new, legal form of slavery that sidestepped the already flawed 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. White landowners exploited and squeezed all the money and resources they could from these Black workers for little or no pay, and up until the formation of the ACP, no one could do anything for fear of retaliation by the police and the KKK. This, along with the day-to-day, systemic racism, caused an intense wave of fear to constantly linger over the heads of Black workers, but nevertheless, they continued to organize anyway, organizing strikes and organizing their own communities. In a few cases, they successfully rallied Black and white workers together, creating a very rare form of solidarity that even now can break the tightest chains of the bourgeoisie. White workers were unorganized and many were swept up in the racist, fascist rhetoric of local bourgeois governments and the Ku Klux Klan. Thus, the fight for higher wages and better working conditions fell on the shoulders of Black workers, who were studying and organizing their own communities to lead the way for a socialist revolution in the South. As early as 1931, Black women led relief committees for their communities. These committees did everything from raising money for families who were short on rent to physically going out to public outlets and appropriating electricity from those outlets for the homes of people who had their power shut off.Though in its time the Alabama Communist Party was a force to be reckoned with, it ran into its own internal problems. In 1938, the communists allowed themselves to work with liberals and Democrats, mainly due to the declining strength of the Farmers’ Union, which had previously been associated with the Sharecroppers’ Union.Additionally, continuous threats from the KKK and local governments had stamped out many prominent communist organizers and fronts. Some were beaten, some were forced to leave town, and some were murdered. Because of this, a few radicals began to believe that radical sharecroppers, farmers and laborers could infiltrate the Democratic Party and turn it into a radical communist party. This strategy, known now as entryism, is not compatible with revolutionary movements because oftentimes, the organization or party which the infiltrators are attempting to breach has already gained a considerable influence and the people in charge of it are steadfast in their views. Unfortunately, at this point, the ACP was beginning to waver in strength and influence among Black radicals, and so many believed that entryism was an acceptable strategy. Anti-communist witch huntIn 1938, Alabama communists teamed up with local Democrats and liberals to organize the first Southern Conference for Human Welfare, a conference that promoted bringing New Deal ideas into the South immediately.The long-term goal of the ACP was to form a United Democratic Front. SCHW was already controversial in the planning stages because of its commitment to call for a repeal of the poll tax, which prevented most poor workers, especially Black workers, from being able to vote. But in the early stages of planning, the local government accused the conference of being a façade for a communist conference, which caused liberal leader Frank Graham to name six communists in the conference. By 1939, members of SCHW were calling for the expulsion of anyone they thought was a communist at their annual conference. Once again, liberalism submitted to reactionary politics and radical Black communists were the ones who suffered.What liberals did not anticipate, but what the reactionary bourgeoisie wanted, were the lasting effects this would have on industrial labor in Birmingham, with its centralized labor system. Between 1939 and 1941, 50 anti-union bills were introduced in Congress, tightening the grip on trade unions and skilled and unskilled labor in Birmingham’s industries. Leading the witch hunt in Birmingham was U.S. Rep. Joe Starnes, who began making McCarthy-like accusations (though McCarthyism would not take grip for another few years) that the Congress of Industrial Organizations in Birmingham was filled with communists. This of course caused backlash from the very religious communities, who doubled down on their anti-communist attacks, allowing unions to be controlled by reactionary behaviors and views. This continued so intensely that even the liberals who had taken the side of the reactionary right were forced to retreat into silence. The ACP abandoned any hope it had for a Southern Democratic Front.By the early 1940s, however, with many liberals disillusioned and Black radicals and nationalists growing in numbers, the ACP began to grow again, despite a major blow to its ranks in the heat of the proto-McCarthy years. The ACP turned away from New Deal liberals, who had very little concern for Black workers, laborers and farmers. They began to grow their own cadres, even resurrecting an idea brought up earlier in the party’s history: to form a Farmer-Labor Party and put their own candidates on the ballot. This party would support proletarian internationalism and massive domestic reform that would eventually become a socialist system and a revolutionary force in the deep South.Rise and fallOne of the strategies that the new members took, along with some of the older comrades, was to begin publishing propaganda aimed at rural workers and farmers who supported them without using the word “communism” or any variation of it. This task was led by Joe Gelders, a longtime communist and party member. The end result was the Birmingham “Southern News Almanac,” which made its debut on Jan. 25, 1940.This strategy was effective. The SNA discussed labor struggles, anti-war activities, the blooming Civil Rights movement and police brutality, all without ever revealing its ties to the ACP. The few Marxist preachers who existed in the South were regular contributors who took a unique approach to Marxism by explaining greed, poverty, capitalism and racism through biblical terms and references. This would become the most widely received propaganda for communism in Alabama and perhaps the Black Belt itself.The resurgence in Alabama was a side effect of a national resurgence in the Communist Party itself, but the exponential growth in Alabama was nothing short of extraordinary.Unfortunately, the party’s resurgence and rededication to the liberation of Black workers and an end to wage slavery would be cut short in 1941, when Nazi Germany invaded the USSR. The national CPUSA headquarters immediately turned from campaigns for self-determination for oppressed groups within the United States, to anti-Hitler campaigns, and all or most chapters followed suit, including Alabama. At this point, the ACP had so many prominent members who had formed their own organizations, or who were dedicated to other organizations (such as LYS: the League of Young Southerners), that the party went back underground, the same underground it had come up from in the early 1930s. In 1949, the CIO betrayed the ACP. It passed directions down to expel anyone suspected of being a Party member. This led to the State Industrial Union Council, National Maritime Union and the International Union of Mine, Mill, and Smelter Workers voting to expel any and all suspected members.In 1950, the Birmingham city council, working with the KKK, passed a city law banning the Communist Party’s activities, and in 1951, the Alabama Communist Control Law was passed, requiring all party members and communist front organizers to register with the Department of Public Safety or face a fine of up to $10,000 and a prison sentence. This act would cause the ACP to formally disband, with many of its members fleeing the state altogether to avoid capture by the KKK.In its 23-year history, the Alabama Communist Party organized four generations of mainly Black workers, farmers and laborers to come together to fight oppression and capitalism, support each other and show international solidarity with struggles all over the world. It did almost all of this underground or behind the scenes. But when it was direct, it struck fear into the minds of all reactionary, racist capitalists who sought to keep alive the decaying system of capitalism. So much fear that it took the government intervening to bring it to a halt.The ACP was a revolutionary party not just because of its revolutionary intentions, which is to say, the revolutionary goals of communism, but revolutionary in that it is probably one of the greatest examples in the U.S. of a rural, revolutionary, Black-led cadre. There were no “big city” or otherwise petty-bourgeois persons with considerable experience who had major influence on the formation and maintaining of the party. It lasted over two decades in that rank-and-file formation which won them many victories, even in the face of perpetual reactionary violence. As is the case with all parties, there were errors made, some of which had lasting effects, such as its repeated attempts to work with bourgeois liberal leaders and groups while not focusing on spreading propaganda to working-class liberals. This would serve as a major error in later years when members started being expelled from these groups.Lessons learnedOne of the main reasons behind the readiness to work with liberals is having to deal with the defeat that is “reform,” which masks itself as a permanent solution, but as history has shown us, is nothing more than an ill-fitting band-aid on a growing wound. Fifteen years before the formation of the ACP, Lenin warned of liberal influence in revolutionary movements:“The liberal bourgeoisie grants reforms with one hand, and with the other hand always takes them back, reduces them to nought, uses them to enslave the workers, to divide them into separate groups and perpetuate wage-slavery. For that reason reformism, even when quite sincere, in practice becomes a weapon by means of which the bourgeoisie corrupts and weakens the workers. The experience of all countries shows that the workers who put their trust in the reformists are always fooled.”However, not all lessons learned are negative, though many in this instance are born from negative experiences. In the continuation of reactionary violence against Black workers, what the reactionaries wanted was retaliation from Black workers so they could advance attacks under the guise of being “threatened,” similar to what police do now (and have always done). Black people were already hunted and lynched, but Black workers unionizing and embracing communism had to face that threat at an even greater volume. However, instead of retaliating aimlessly, Black workers organized endlessly, often in secrecy, to sustain their own communities and fight off Klan members and the state government.  The lesson here is that even in the face of what seems to be ceaseless reactionary violence and spineless liberalism, a disciplined, structured cadre is what will see revolutionaries through. Disciplined self-defenseAs communists, we understand and utilize self-defense; when the oppressed rise up against the ruling class, it is always in self-defense — self-defense from being exploited and killed off further, but even then in these instances, it must be disciplined. Practice cannot be carried out without theory and theory cannot be understood without practice; to try and advance one without acknowledging and studying the other will either lead to inaction or counterrevolutionary, ultraleft violence that will no doubt have a severe backlash on the most oppressed. The Black sharecroppers, farmers, domestic workers and miners of the ACP and the masses they organized and rallied largely understood this. In such a violent climate, it was a key to their 23-year survival, at which point the only way they could be permanently shut out as an organized party was by state intervention by way of anti-communist legislation.Despite errors, this does not in any way negate the revolutionary history and legacy of the ACP. At a time when Black people, especially Black workers, were being treated with extreme hostility and their nearly every move was being watched by local government and the KKK (though the two were and still are often indistinguishable), they managed to organize themselves into a disciplined force fighting for revolutionary socialism, starting in their own self-sustained communities and moving outwards, showing national and international solidarity with all labor and oppressed movements. This form of communism, which could appropriately be called rural communism, is a movement that needs to be studied intensely by all communists. It is a prime example of the rural working class, almost all of whom were Black, gaining the class consciousness that is needed to fight for socialism and organizing their class into a mobile movement against capitalism and white supremacy in an extremely reactionary climate and point in history.Though the Alabama Communist Party was officially dissolved in 1951, the fighting spirit of those revolutionary laborers and workers lives on in all of us proletarians.Long live the Alabama Sharecroppers Union! Long live the International Labor Defense! Long live the Alabama Communist Party!Devin Cole is a transgender Southern organizer and Workers World Party member. This article was originally published by theforgenews.org and can be found in its entirety at tinyurl.com/y8o6u4t2.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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New medical school training its first generation of doctors

first_imgFacebook + posts What were reading: Trump rally, human trafficking, Paris Climate Accord, deadly attack Andre Riveroyhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/andre-riveroy/ TCU and UNTHSC white coats on display at the TCU and UNTHSC School of Medicine announcement event. Photo by Cristian Argueta Soto. Twitter Linkedin Andre Riveroyhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/andre-riveroy/ New software at health center hopes to increase organization Andre Riveroy is a double major in political science and news and media studies from Chino Hills, California. Being a senior and in his last semester, Andre is in the process of applying to Law School for the upcoming school year. TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Neeley graduate creates clothing line for disabled TCU hands-only CPR clinic in Frog Alley Andre Riveroyhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/andre-riveroy/ ReddIt print Students at the TCU and UNTHSC School of Medicine reveal and put on their coats at the school’s first white coat ceremony. Video courtesy of Cristian ArguetaSoto. Students at the new TCU and UNTHSC School of Medicine marked their first milestone since starting classes in July- earning their white coats. TCU and UNTHSC white coats on display at the TCU and UNTHSC School of Medicine announcement event. Photo by Cristian Argueta Soto.The program is trying to set itself apart from traditional medical schools with a communication-based curriculum meant to teach students empathy and to be active listeners. Simulation and modeling tools help students learn how to provide optimal care, and students are paired with a physician coach to help with professional and personal development.“Our singular mission is to create the best future physicians,” said Dr. Stuart Flynn, the dean of the medical school. “We want to ensure that our medical students are equipped to be skilled and empathetic physicians when they graduate.” Some of the inaugural students are in familiar territory- 12 out of 60 are TCU alumni.“I know some of the professors and physicians working at the school from my time as an undergrad,” said McKenna Chalman, who graduated from TCU in the spring. “I am still quite familiar with the campus and the Fort Worth area, and several of my classmates from undergrad school have matriculated into this program with me as well.” TCU and UNTHSC first inaugural class. Photo Courtesy: TCU and UNTHSC School of MedicineFlynn said students, both TCU alumni and others, have been adjusting quickly to the program.Dr. Stuart Flynn. Photo courtesy: TCU and UNTHSC School of Medicine “Students spent the first few months adapting to our unique curriculum – a patient-centered approach that will produce compassionate, innovative and life-long learners,” Flynn said.The medical school has already begun providing care to some in the Fort Worth community and receiving one-on-one mentoring sessions with faculty clinicians. “This will allow them to build long-term relationships with patients, which is critical to maintaining the empathy they bring with them as new medical students,” Flynn said.  The students each come from unique and diverse backgrounds, Chalman said. “The admissions committee did a great job of seeking this diversity as well as identifying students who are not only academically strong, but are also great communicators, are altruistic and empathetic,” Chalman said. The average for graduating physicians is close to $200,000, Flynn said. Therefore, each of the students will have their first-year tuition paid for by the H. Paul Dorman Charter Scholarship program.Chalman said the scholarship represents the commitment being made to the medical school.“The gift allows students to concentrate on their studies with a significantly diminished financial burden,” Flynn said. “We must continue to grow our scholarship funding as we attract new students to join our school.” Linkedin Andre Riveroyhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/andre-riveroy/ Andre Riveroy Twitter ReddIt Facebook Previous articleVaping is prohibited, but don’t expect a “tobacco violation”Next articleWhat we’re reading: Pelosi announces impeachment inquiry against President Trump Andre Riveroy RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution Welcome TCU Class of 2025last_img read more

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16 Days continues in Limerick

first_imgFacebook THE INTERNATIONAL 16 Days of Action campaign against domestic violence and abuse continues into December with events organised by the LImerick Women’s Network,  Adapt House and other agencies.In Ireland, one in five women experience domestic violence during their lifetime, and it is estimated that 213,000 women in Ireland are living with severe abuse from their boyfriends, husbands and partners, according to Adapt, the Limerick  Domestic Abuse Services the national organisation, Women’s AidSign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Since 1996, support groups and service have used the 16 Days Campaign to raise awareness of the reality of domestic violence and to push for positive change to increase women’s safety.Women’s support services, groups under the Local Community and Development Programme, Family Resource Centres, student groups, and others hold local awareness raising events throughout the country during the 16 Days of Action.The 16 Days Campaign is an international campaign that started in 1991. Since then, over 5,179 groups in 187 countries have taken part. For more information, see the next edition of the Limerick Post dated November 25. Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” Email WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Linkedin Vanishing Ireland podcast documenting interviews with people over 70’s, looking for volunteers to share their stories TAGSADAPTDomestic abusefeaturedlimerickunited and strongviolence WhatsAppcenter_img Previous articleRussell Brand wades in to support anti-water charges protest in LimerickNext article16 Days of Action Against Violence Against Women Bernie Englishhttp://www.limerickpost.ieBernie English has been working as a journalist in national and local media for more than thirty years. She worked as a staff journalist with the Irish Press and Evening Press before moving to Clare. She has worked as a freelance for all of the national newspaper titles and a staff journalist in Limerick, helping to launch the Limerick edition of The Evening Echo. Bernie was involved in the launch of The Clare People where she was responsible for business and industry news. NewsBreaking newsCommunity16 Days continues in LimerickBy Bernie English – November 28, 2014 975 Advertisement Twitter Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Print Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed livelast_img read more

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Council criticised for not sending reps to America for St Patrick’s Day

first_img Pinterest Donegal County Council has been heavily criticised for not sending over any representatives for the annual St. Patrick’s Day celebrations in America this year.According to Letterkenny Town Councillor Jimmy Kavanagh, members of the Donegal Association in New York were disappointed that the County Council had no representative at the parade.Councillor Kavanagh, who was in the US for St Patrick’s Day, says the was also anger from the undocumented Irish currently living in America:[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/jkav530.mp3[/podcast] LUH system challenged by however, work to reduce risk to patients ongoing – Dr Hamilton Facebook Almost 10,000 appointments cancelled in Saolta Hospital Group this week Facebook Calls for maternity restrictions to be lifted at LUH WhatsApp Twitter Twitter Newsx Adverts RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORcenter_img Pinterest WhatsApp Three factors driving Donegal housing market – Robinson Google+ Business Matters Ep 45 – Boyd Robinson, Annette Houston & Michael Margey Previous articleSharp rise in numbers seeking help from MABSNext articleSlowdown in number paying the Household Charge News Highland Guidelines for reopening of hospitality sector published By News Highland – April 11, 2012 Google+ Council criticised for not sending reps to America for St Patrick’s Daylast_img read more

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Delhi HC Issues Notice In Anil Ambani’s Plea Seeking Impleadment of Chinese Banks In His Case Against SBI

first_imgNews UpdatesDelhi HC Issues Notice In Anil Ambani’s Plea Seeking Impleadment of Chinese Banks In His Case Against SBI Karan Tripathi12 Oct 2020 9:15 AMShare This – xDelhi High Court has issued notice in an application moved by Anil Ambani seeking the impleadment of Chinese banks in his pending petition challenging the appointment of a Resolution Professional for personal guarantee given by him for loans taken by Reliance Communications Ltd (RCom) and Reliance Infratel Ltd (RITL) from the State Bank of India. The Division Bank of Justice Vipin…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginDelhi High Court has issued notice in an application moved by Anil Ambani seeking the impleadment of Chinese banks in his pending petition challenging the appointment of a Resolution Professional for personal guarantee given by him for loans taken by Reliance Communications Ltd (RCom) and Reliance Infratel Ltd (RITL) from the State Bank of India. The Division Bank of Justice Vipin Sanghi and Justice Rajneesh Bhatnagar has issued notice to the State Bank of India, and the Union of India, while asking both the parties to submit brief written submissions on this issue before the next date of hearing. The application was moved by Ambani in light of the development whereby some Chinese banks have approached the courts in the United Kingdom against the assets of Ambani. Appearing for Anil Ambani, Senior Advocate Harish Salve argued that these Chinese banks must be made a party before this court so that their response can be sought on the proceedings that are pending before the UK courts. ‘We don’t want an order to be passed by a court in the UK the execution of which amounts to a contempt of this court’, Mr Salve argued. In addition to this, Senior Advocate Neeraj Kishan Kaul, who was representing SBI, informed the court that the interim moratorium under section 96 of the Insolvency and Bankruptcy Code must stay in force as an application under section 95 has been moved against Ambani before the NCLT. In the last hearing, the court had restricted Anil Ambani from alienating his assets for an interim period which was further extended today till the next date of hearing. The order has come in a plea moved by Anil Ambani against the appointment of a Resolution Professional (RP) on personal guarantee given by him against a loan taken by Reliance Communications Ltd (RCom) and Reliance Infratel Ltd (RITL) from State Bank of India (SBI). In addition to this, Ambani has also challenged the validity of the provision regarding the personal guarantee and bankruptcy by arguing that there is no enabling provision in the Insolvency and Bankruptcy Code (IBC) for such an order. Ambani is aggrieved by the order passed by the National Company Law Tribunal on August 20 wherein it is stated that: ‘there is no doubt that Ambani furnished his personal guarantee for the credit facility availed by RCom and RITL… The authority accordingly has no other option than to issue the direction.’ Ambani had given a personal guarantee for the loans taken by RCOM and RITL in tune of Rs 1195 crore from the State Bank of India. In 2017, the said firms defaulted on payment which resulted in their loan accounts being declared as Non Performing Assets (NPA). In March 2020, SBI had filed a petition before the Mumbai bench of the National Company Law Tribunal (NCLT) under section 95 of IBC for personal bankruptcy based on the guarantees issued by Ambani. Under sections 94 or 95 of the IBC, whenever a petition is moved in this regard, NCLT has to direct the Insolvency and Bankruptcy Board of India, within seven days of the application, to nominate a RP. Subscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more

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Met Eireann says Lorenzo could impact NW coast

first_img Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Google+ Twitter News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Facebook Pinterest Community Enhancement Programme open for applications WhatsApp Met Eireann says it’s on standby to issue a status orange weather warning for certain areas as Hurricane Lorenzo approaches Ireland.There’s still uncertainty surrounding the exact track of the hurricane, but by the time it reaches us, it’s predicted to have weakened to a tropical storm.The Housing Minister will convene a meeting of the National Emergency Co-ordination Group (NECG) in Agriculture House at 4pm today.The ESB, Gardaí, public transport operators and local authorities have been told to be ready to activate their crisis management plans.Evelyn Cusack, Head of Forecasting at Met Eireann, says they’re waiting to see how the storm develops before issuing a weather warning, but is confirming that the North West coast is potentially in the firing line………..Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/13cusack-lorenzo.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Twitter AudioHomepage BannerNews Met Eireann says Lorenzo could impact NW coastcenter_img Pinterest Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Previous articleCommunity Hospital campaigners seek meeting with Minister Joe Mc HughNext articleCouncil urged to keep removal of gravel from Foyle on agenda News Highland Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Google+ WhatsApp Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR By News Highland – October 1, 2019 last_img read more

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Highland Radio mourns sad passing of presenter Pio McCann

first_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Highland Radio mourns sad passing of presenter Pio McCann Highland Radio is deeply saddened at the news of the passing of our dear friend and colleague Pio McCann. Pio died peacefully at his home this morning surrounded by his family.We will have a celebration of Pios life on his show tomorrow Saturday from 12 noon – 2pm.Pio’s Dad Mickey was an All Ireland Champion Lilter and his uncle Jimmy played in a very successful Céilí Band. Pio played with them 2 or 3 nights a week from the age of 10 or 11.Following that he joined the Claxton Showband (managed by Barney Curley) 1961 – 1967 where he remained for a few years and went on to join Brian Coll and the Buckaroos, he later played with Hugo Duncan andThe Tall Men (managed by Greg Hughes) and The Polka Dots.Pio joined Erneside Radio in 1987 after hearing an Ad looking for Presenters.In 2008 Pio was honoured with the CMA International Broadcaster Award in Nashville. This award recognised the outstanding achievement by a Radio Broadcaster outside the United States for their important contributions towards the development of Country Music in their Country.The Award was presented to Pio by George Hamilton IV. Vince Gill was on stage that night he got the award. Pio described this as a very special moment that he would treasure forever.Pio’s love of Country Music was evident throughout his weekly programmes here on Highland, his aim was always to encourage and nurture up and coming young acts ensuring that the Country Music scene remained fresh and vibrant, getting them air-play and recognition as he has done for so many artists throughout his 30 years on the airwaves.Pio is married to Rae and they have 6 children and 12 GrandchildrenNicholas, Connor, Alison, Diane, Coleen and Aaron, Daughter in law Joanne, Sons in law Ollie, Brendan and Conor.Ar dheis Dé go raibh a anam dílis. WhatsApp Homepage BannerNews Google+ Community Enhancement Programme open for applications Facebook Pinterest Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA By News Highland – October 9, 2020 center_img Previous articleLocal Principal moves to clarify claims of Covid outbreakNext articleCoveney calls for more cooperation as NI daily Covid total reaches 1,080 News Highland Google+ Twitter Twitter Pinterest WhatsApp Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Facebook Publicans in Republic watching closely as North reopens further Renewed calls for full-time Garda in Kilmacrennanlast_img read more

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Charges filed in killing of University of Utah student Mackenzie Lueck

first_imgSalt Lake County Sheriffs Office(SALT LAKE CITY) — Charges were filed Wednesday against the man accused of kidnapping and killing University of Utah student Mackenzie Lueck, prosecutors said.Ayoola Ajayi, 31, is accused of aggravated murder, aggravated kidnapping, obstructing justice and desecration of a human body, Salt Lake County District Attorney Sim Gill said at a news conference on Wednesday.Lueck, a 23-year-old kinesiology major who was set to graduate next year, had been missing in the Salt Lake City area for nearly two weeks before her suspected killer was arrested on June 28.Her remains were found on July 3 in a shallow grave in a wooded area of Logan Canyon, Gil said.Lueck was last seen early on June 17. She landed at Salt Lake City International Airport around 2 a.m. and then took a Lyft from the airport to Hatch Park in north Salt Lake City, police said.The driver told police that Lueck met someone at the park and that she didn’t seem to be in distress, police said.She was never seen again.Authorities later determined Lueck’s last communication was with Ajayi, said police. Phone records show that Lueck and Ajayi were both at Hatch Park within less than one minute of each other, according to authorities.During a search of Ajayi’s home, his neighbors told police they saw him using gasoline to burn something in his backyard on June 17 and 18, police said. “Several charred items consistent with” Lueck’s belongings were found there, police said.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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