New mother should be applauded for decision to quit politics – Aust

first_imgDaily Telegraph 12 March 2017Family First Comment: “Children flourish when their parents are around. The OECD may crap on, as it did this week, about how stay-at-home mums are an untapped resource of workers and therefore a drain on the economy, but the fact is some people still enjoy raising the babies they chose to have.”Well said. Great decision, mum. You won’t ever regret it.There’s been a picture of a little boy in the newspapers this week. He’s wearing a green T-shirt and his smile is so shiny and spontaneous that anyone seeing him couldn’t fail to smile back.His name is Sam and he’s two and he’s made the news for the simple fact that his mum wants to take care of him.She wants to be there when he learns to bat a ball and when he figures out how to tie his shoelaces and when he writes his name for the first time. In the words of Aerosmith, she doesn’t want to miss a thing.The trouble is Sam’s mum is Kate Ellis and this week she quit politics after 13 years because she wants to be with her child.Now my barometer for the national mood may be way off whack but my genuine response to the news was this: “Good on ya Kate. You won’t regret that decision.”Others felt differently. Jamila Rizvi, a talented journalist and former ministerial staffer, said Ellis’s decision had left her in “floods of tears” and “seething with anger” because “motherhood and politics don’t mix”. Another writer said the announcement had “hit her hard” because in Ellis she’d come closer than ever “to having myself represented in parliament.”It’s always tricky when a personal choice becomes political but on both counts Ellis should be applauded. Let’s start with the personal.Children flourish when their parents are around. The OECD may crap on, as it did this week, about how stay-at-home mums are an untapped resource of workers and therefore a drain on the economy, but the fact is some people still enjoy raising the babies they chose to have. Ellis has spent more than a decade in parliament and now she wants to spend time with the child she loves. This doesn’t mean her skills and talent are going to be reduced to producing mashed pumpkin. She’ll use this time to broaden both her life and career. Perhaps there’ll be a corporate role in Adelaide. Maybe she’ll use her expertise in early childhood education to consult. I’m a huge advocate for women keeping a hand — or even just a fingernail — in the workplace when they have kids. Whatever Ellis chooses — even a return to parliament — will illustrate that work is no longer linear but characterised by agility, flexibility and change.I’m championing Ellis’s decision because career dexterity is not just the future for women but men too.READ MORE: http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/rendezview/kate-ellis-shoud-be-applauded-for-her-decision-to-quit-federal-politics/news-story/f1f60ba5b890b13f5944220d5c748c6fKeep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inboxlast_img read more

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Hoffenheim avoid early exit; Stuttgart, Leverkusen advance

first_imgBERLIN: Hoffenheim saw off courageous Chemnitzer FC 3-2 following a penalty shootout whereas Stuttgart and Bayer Leverkusen got the job done with more ease to get through the opening round in the German Cup.Chemnitzer FC took the reins and disrupted Hoffenheim’s build-up work in the opening stages on Sunday, forcing Hoffenheim goalkeeper Oliver Baumann into action twice with early chances. Hoffenheim gained a foothold into the clash as the clock ticked after Emin Bickakic and Dennis Geiger came close at the half-hour mark. The lower league side had their goalkeeper Jakub Jakubov to thank as he defused the promising efforts on target from Andrej Kramaric and Christoph Baumgartner before the break. After the restart, Kramaric remained a factor and secured his side the opener as he benefitted on Ihlas Bebou’s square pass to tap home into the open goal with three minutes played in the second half. The hosts remained unimpressed and flabbergasted Hoffenheim with the equalizer at the hour mark when Kevin Freiberger controlled a pinpoint cross from Paul Milde to beat Baumann with a turn and shoot from 10 meters. Both sides traded frenetic attacks but neither was able to break the tie before the final whistle. Hoffenheim pressed for the winner in extra time but it was the underdogs who grabbed the lead as Freiberger’s lay up allowed Christian Bickel to slot home in the 100th minute to make it 2-1. The top flight side started an onslaught on Chemnitz’s goal and they got rewarded in the 111th minute when Kramaric wrapped up his brace after keeping his nerves from the penalty spot to ensure the shootout. In the penalty shootout, Hoffenheim’s goalkeeper Baumann saved two penalties while Bickel missed the target from the spot, allowing Hoffenheim to advance into the second round. Elsewhere, Bayer Leverkusen cruised into the next round as Nadiem Amiri’s brace rounded off the 7-0 goal fest against Eintracht Norderstedt. Stuttgart edged third-division club Hansa Rostock on a sole goal from Sila Wamangituka and Jonathan Schmid’s 2-1 winner for Freiburg sealed Waldhof Mannheim’s first round exit. IANS Also Watch: Watch: River Flows Inside People’s Bedroomlast_img read more

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Track squads split over weekend

first_imgWith the outdoor track season now in full gear, the University of Wisconsin men’s and women’s squads will prepare for yet another busy weekend of competition. A large portion of the men’s team — and a few female athletes — will have to recover quickly from last week’s Drake Relays.This weekend will provide UW with several opportunities to compete, as Badger track athletes will be spread out across the country. Both the men’s and women’s teams will send groups to either Arkansas for the Twilight Invitational or to California for the Payton Jordan Cardinal Invitational. The remaining athletes will remain in Madison for the Wisconsin Open.Drake Stadium annually provides one of the most highly-anticipated outdoor events of the year, and the 2009 version proved to be no different.The men’s team produced a lot of excitement on the Drake Stadium track, and freshman hurdler Adam Hexum was very much a part of the action.Hexum, a freshman from Stone Lake, Wis., led off the shuttle relay team for the Badgers that went on to win the event. Hexum was ecstatic to win the relay but admitted it was nothing he and his teammates spend a lot of time practicing.“The shuttle hurdles is a rare event, so we never really practice it, but we performed really well,” Hexum said. “It was great to take an individual event like the hurdles and compete in it as a team.”While the shuttle hurdle relay was a new event for Hexum, it only increased his excitement, and he felt the opportunity to run in a relay added some extra motivation to his performance.“I was definitely more excited just because it was a team thing,” Hexum said. “Being a part of the relay team just gave me more energy because I didn’t want to let the guys down.”Hexum certainly did not let anyone down and even has a first-place finish from the Drake Relays to show for it. The freshman was able to showcase his talents on one of outdoor track’s biggest stages, and it provided him with an experience he will not soon forget.“Drake was amazing,” Hexum said. “It was the first time I had ever been there, and the coaches had been telling us all about it, but when I finally got there I realized just how incredible it was.”The women’s team did not send out many athletes to perform at the Drake Relays, but senior javelin thrower Amy Lewis was one of the few who competed. Like Hexum, this was Lewis’ first time competing at the Drake Relays, and she relished the experience.“That was my first time at the Drake Relays, and it was incredible,” Lewis said. “It has so much history, and it’s pretty amazing that they are able to sellout and get that many people to come to a track meet.”Lewis has been a part of some noteworthy competitions throughout her career and acknowledged the high level of competition and the unique opportunity that Drake is able to provide year in and year out.“The competition is obviously great, and it is interesting to see some of these great competitors throw,” Lewis said. “At the Drake Relays, you know that you have to really step up if you want to be competitive.”With the valuable experience gained from the Drake Relays firmly behind them, the men’s and women’s teams will look to make some final improvements as the championship portion of the season draws near.“It is important not to taper at all during these next couple events,” Lewis said. “Competing well this weekend is really important, because you want to carry some momentum into those later meets.”last_img read more

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Orgeron has USC living in the now

first_img“Inside the 20s” runs Tuesdays. To comment on this story, email Nick at nselbe@usc.edu or visit dailytrojan.com.Follow Nick on Twitter @NickSelbe It started around 5:30 p.m. on Thursday, roughly two hours before kickoff. USC coaches, players and players’ family members gathered around midfield at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum for a pregame prayer and pep talk, led by interim head coach Ed Orgeron. The purpose, players said, was to emphasize the overarching theme that will drive this year’s Trojans to wherever they end up: family.“It was a great feeling. The team that prays together stays together,” redshirt junior linebacker Hayes Pullard said after USC’s 38-31 victory over Arizona. “We are one big family and we wanted to bring the parents in and all pray together. Coach O emphasized that we are a unit, so it was great to bring everyone together.”In the two weeks since he’s taken over as leader of the program, Orgeron has preached three things to his players: be physical up front, play with enthusiasm and have fun. All three attributes have been tenets of Orgeron’s coaching philosophy throughout his career, and players seem rejuvenated by the sudden infusion of energy following the dismissal of former head coach Lane Kiffin.“He’s the definition of ‘Fight On’ and being a Trojan,” redshirt senior outside linebacker Devon Kennard said of Orgeron. “You can’t do anything but love him. He’ll get after you when you do something wrong, but once you start doing things right, there’s nobody that [will] be more excited for you than him. We’ll go through a wall for Coach O.”To call Orgeron the anti-Kiffin would be fairly accurate. Kiffin was renowned for his knowledge of the Xs and Os and had total control over the Trojans’ offense during his three-plus seasons at USC. In his first game as interim head coach, what input did Orgeron give to offensive coordinator Clay Helton, who called the plays against Arizona?“I didn’t have to say a word on the headsets, except ‘Atta boy, good job Cody, good job Clay,’” Orgeron said.Where Kiffin was reserved on the sidelines during games, Orgeron was anything but on Thursday. Not only was he fired up himself, but he implored his players to join in on the high-fives and chest bumps, and the players by and large embraced this drastic change in sideline behavior.“[Defensive linemen] know how Coach O is, so it’s funny seeing other guys getting hyped up now by some of the things he’s doing,” Kennard said. “It’s awesome seeing how infectious he can be to an entire team.”Orgeron’s tactics have been effective, at least for one week, because his rah-rah persona seems 100 percent sincere, just as Kiffin’s stoicism was an indelible part of his identity.Neither approach is inherently better or worse than the other; coaches such as Kansas State’s Bill Snyder and Stanford’s David Shaw have experienced tremendous success throughout their careers while maintaining a certain level of calm on the sidelines. But Orgeron’s style has certainly been effective in motivating this current group of players and has earned him the respect of the athletic administration.“Ed is a very iconic figure around here. What impresses me is that he brings it every day,” USC Athletic Director Pat Haden said. “This is not a fake thing with him. He brings the energy every day, and I think our guys really appreciate it. He’s a great coach, and people like Ed. He’s a very likeable guy, and that’s a good thing right now.”Haden is unquestionably a very smart man, and he chooses his words carefully. When speaking about Orgeron, the phrase “right now” seems most appropriate in discussing his suitableness as USC’s next head coach, sans the “interim” prefix.I don’t know that Orgeron is the best candidate to become USC’s permanent head coach, and I don’t know that he isn’t. At this point, it’s far too early to make that kind of judgment, and Haden is very aware of this.But Orgeron is the perfect coach for USC “right now.” At this juncture, USC does not need a coach; it needs a leader. This is not to say that Kiffin could not lead, but Orgeron is much better suited to pilot the team in a time of crisis. He’s the ideal candidate for the “break glass in case of emergency” situation the USC football program currently finds itself in.After the win against Arizona, it seemed as though players were fighting among themselves to see who could give Orgeron the best compliment. Positive energy is always a good thing, but USC won’t be able to reach its goals this season based on good morale alone. There are still many issues the team has to deal with, such as its pass defense and lack of depth at wide receiver. Those areas must be fixed for the wins to start piling up.But that doesn’t seem to be of much concern for USC players, who are merely happy to see their beloved Coach O enjoy success. In the competition for praising Orgeron, redshirt sophomore quarterback Cody Kessler might have finished in first place:“You want a coach that you would go to war for every time,” Kessler said. “[With Orgeron], and I don’t just speak for myself, I speak for the whole team, we would go to war for this guy any day of the week. When you can not only see but feel that he cares about you so much, that’s love right there. I couldn’t ask for a better head coach right now.”And as of right now, how could it get any better than that?last_img read more

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Venus Williams could become oldest Wimbledon singles champion today

first_imgVenus Williams attempts to become the oldest winner of the women’s singles title at Wimbledon for more than a century today.The 37-year-old faces 2015 finalist Garbine Muguruza from 2pm.Williams has battled a fatigue related illness in recent years and she’s delighted to be in the final at SW19 Photo: © pixabay Muguruza lost out to Venus’ sister Serena in that final and the Spaniard feels she has learned from that experiencelast_img

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