Injured Bishoo ruled out of third Test

first_imgSYDNEY, Australia (CMC):West Indies’ hopes of using two spinners for the third Test match against Australia have been squashed after leg-spinner Devendra Bishoo was ruled out of the final game here starting today (last night Jamaica time).Captain Jason Holder announced that Bishoo had not fully recovered from a left shoulder injury and was not available for selection.The one specialist spinner left in the squad is left-arm spinner Jomel Warrican, who played in the first match in Hobart and the second match at the Melbourne Cricket Ground.”We’re down to one spinner with the injury to Bishoo, so we just have to work with what we have. I’m sure Kraigg Brathwaite will come to the fore and bowl a bit more,” Holder told reporters on the eve of the match.”I’ve seen they’ve gone with two spinners. We’ve been accustomed to spin-bowling in the Caribbean and, hopefully, our batsmen can get into that a lot better than we have in this series.”Heavy defeatsWest Indies have already lost the series following heavy defeats in the first two Tests. They went down by an innings and 212 runs in the Hobart opener before losing by 177 runs in the second Test in Melbourne last week.Holder said the team was buoyant following their improved outing in the second match, when they showed more resistance than in the three-day defeat in Hobart.”We showed some improvement with the bat in Melbourne and we will look to take that into this match here. From the start of the tour, many people say the odds are against us, but we have belief and we will put up a good showing,” Holder contended.last_img read more

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SA scientists win AU awards

first_imgScience in Africa is to come under the spotlight through the AU Scientific Awards. (Image: Nasa)Two South African scientists have walked off with top honours at the inaugural African Union Scientific Awards. The awards programme was launched in September 2009, and the laureates were announced earlier in 2010.Witwatersrand University’s (Wits) Professor Diane Hildebrandt and Professor Patrick Eriksson of Pretoria University were singled out for the prestigious honour from 48 entries sent in from all over Africa.Two categories were judged – Life and Earth Sciences, which Eriksson won; and Basic Science, Technology and Innovation, which Hindebrandt won. Each received a prize worth US$100 000 (R731 061).President Jacob Zuma was quick to applaud the achievement of the two scientists during the awards ceremony, which took place in Addis Ababa during the 14th AU summit.“I say with pride that South Africans continue to display excellence in various fields in the international arena,” said the president.“On behalf of the South African people I wish to congratulate Professor Hildebrandt and Professor Eriksson, and wish them well in their endeavours to make Africa and the world a better place to live.”Top achieverHildebrandt, one of South Africa’s top chemical engineers, is a professor of sustainable process engineering in the School of Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering, and is also co-director at the university’s Centre for Optimisation Modelling and Process Synthesis.She started her career as a process engineer at South Africa’s fuel giant Sasol and obtained her BSc, MSc and PhD in chemical engineering from Wits University. Her career at her alma mater now spans more than 20 years.Hildebrandt was the first woman chemical engineer to earn an A rating from the National Research Foundation. A prolific author, she has more than 50 papers to her name.Winning awards is not a novelty for her – she’s already been honoured with the Vice-Chancellor’s Researcher of the Year Award in 2002; the Bill Neale-May Gold Medal of the South African Institute of Chemical Engineers in 2000; the Meiring Naudé medal of the Royal Society of South Africa in 1997; the Distinguished Researcher Award of the University of the Witwatersrand in 1996; and the President’s Award of the Foundation for Research and Development in 1996 and 2010.“I’m grateful for the award and look forward to making further contributions to Africa and its development,” she said in an interview with University World News, adding that there are many scientists who strive to improve conditions for all Africans, often under difficult circumstances.Internationally respectedEriksson is head of Pretoria University’s Geology Department, a post he has held since 2006. He joined the department as a lecturer in 1982 and rose to a professorship 12 years later. Eriksson completed his PhD in 1984 and obtained a higher doctorate from Ludwig-Maximilian University in Munich in 1998.He lectures in sedimentology and his research focuses on the evolution of Precambrian (sedimentary) basins. He is a member of the New York Academy of Sciences and a Fellow of the Geological Society of Africa, and still finds time to act as editor-in-chief of the Journal of African Earth Sciences.The National Research Foundation gave him an A research rating in 2007.Well respected on an international level, he founded the Global Precambrian Sedimentation Syndicate in 1997, an informal working group comprising 16 eminent scientists from South Africa, the US, UK, Germany, Denmark, Finland, Brazil, Australia, and India.Accepting the AU award, Eriksson paid tribute to his peers on the continent.Boosting African scienceThe AU Scientific Awards programme is aimed at inspiring the continent’s best minds to bigger and better achievements, and also celebrates their efforts to boost entrepreneurship in science and research, attract investment into African science, and establish scientific centres of excellence in Africa.The African Academy of Sciences, Twas (formerly the Third World Academy of Sciences) bureau in Africa, and the Network of African Science Academies adjudicated the awards.Winners are selected according to several criteria, including the number of publications they have written or co-written, the number of graduate research students they have mentored, and the relevance of their work in tackling the challenges facing the African continent as well as the ease of application.Besides the AU Science Award, also up for grabs are the AU Young Scientist Award, handed out on a national level to promising researchers under 35 years of age, and the AU Woman Scientist Award, which is region-based. These prizes fall into the same two categories as the main accolade.last_img read more

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a month agoMan City boss Guardiola reveals new squad addition

first_imgMan City boss Guardiola reveals new squad additionby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester City youngster Taylor Harwood-Bellis has been officially promoted to the first-team squad.City boss Pep Guardiola confirmed the news on Saturday.“From now on, he will train with us,” Guardiola said of the 17 year-old. “Whether he will play or not, we’ll see.“The guys from the academy spoke really well about him before pre-season.“I saw in pre-season. He is aggressive, he wins duels, he pays attention.“ About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Chamber Luncheon with BC Liberal Leader Andrew Wilkinson

first_imgJoin the Fort St. John and District Chamber of Commerce and the ICBA to hear B.C. Opposition Leader Andrew Wilkinson’s views on the upcoming referendum on electoral reform. Mr. Wilkinson will discuss why a new voting system could mean the end of local representation, clear the path for fringe parties to make decisions in the BC Legislature, and why he believes the deck has been stacked by politicians to ensure the referendum succeeds.The event will happen Wednesday, September 26, 2018, at the Pomeroy Hotel and Conference Centre from 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m.The B.C. Opposition Leader will also discuss pipelines and taxes. Tickets are $35 plus fees and taxes for Chamber Members and $45 for non-members and can be purchased by clicking here or by visiting Energetictickets.ca.last_img read more

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Kejriwal meets CPI delegation to discuss political situation in Delhi

first_imgNew Delhi: AAP chief Arvind Kejriwal on Tuesday met a delegation of Communist Party of India (CPI) to discuss the political situation in the country especially in Delhi and discussed ways to defeat the BJP.CPI leader D Raja said the delegation discussed with Kejriwal how the saffron party must be defeated in the upcoming Lok Sabha elections. Kejriwal, responding to question earlier on Tuesday on his recent decision to form alliances with other political parties, said the “the Modi-Amit Shah duo is dangerous for the country and the whole country should unite to remove them” He said “in this direction whatever has to be done would be done”. Noting that the country is important, Kejriwal said no party or leader is small in front of the country. “There are two types of people in the country — one are Modi bhakts and another are those who want Modi to lose. The number of Modi bhakts is lower than that of the people who want to defeat Modi,” he told reporters earlier.last_img read more

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Rajasthan officials held with unaccounted cash of Rs 10.67 lakh

first_imgKota (Rajasthan): Sleuths of the anti-corruption bureau (ACB) here recovered unaccounted cash of Rs 10.67 lakh from two officials posted with the Water Resources Department in Atru of Baran district in Rajasthan, police said Saturday. The amount was recovered during a checking on the Baran Kota highway near Nohar Thursday night, police said. “The two officials have not been arrested or booked for corruption as investigation is underway,” police maintained. Also Read – 2019 most peaceful festive season for J&K: Jitendra Singh According to ASP (ACB) Chandrasheel Thakur, they had got a tip-off that assistant engineer Mohan Lal Sharma had collected a huge amount as commission from contractors and was returning to Kota by a government vehicle. “The ACB sleuths stopped the government vehicle, in which Mohan Lal Sharma and executive engineer Satyendra Kumar Pareek were travelling along with another official of the department,” the officer said. During checking of the vehicle, a bag belonging to Sharma and containing Rs 10 lakh in cash was recovered, the officer said, adding that Sharma failed to give a satisfactory reply about the amount. Also Read – Personal life needs to be respected: Cong on reports of Rahul’s visit abroad “Similarly, Rs 66,940 was recovered from executive engineer Pareek, who, too, failed to give a satisfactory reply. They were brought to the ACB office for questioning, he said. Mohal Lal Sharma, however, contended that the amount recovered from him had been borrowed from a contractor from Baran, but when the contractor was contacted for verification, he refused to have lent the amount to Sharma, said police. “During a search operation at Sharma’s residence in Kota, a large number of documents pertaining to several plots and bank accounts were recovered,” ASP Thakur said. Investigation into the case was underway and the officials would be arrested for corruption once it was completed, he said.last_img read more

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Nirav Modi fails to convince UK judge that he’s not a flight risk

first_imgLondon: A UK judge who denied bail to Nirav Modi for a third time remained unconvinced that his community ties to Britain were strong enough to not make him a flight risk even though the fugitive diamond merchant was willing to double his security to 2 million pounds and live on a strict 24-hour curfew at his posh apartment in London. The 48-year-old, wanted in India as the main accused in the Punjab National Bank (PNB) fraud and money laundering case amounting to up to USD 2 billion, is back in prison after his bail was denied on Wednesday by Westminster Magistrates’ Court Chief Magistrate Emma Arbuthnot. Also Read – 2019 most peaceful festive season for J&K: Jitendra SinghModi, clean-shaven and smartly dressed for court, sat in the dock and took notes as the prosecution painted a picture of a “diabolical” mastermind behind the luring away of witnesses, mostly his former employees, to far off destinations and destruction of potential evidence. There were moments during the hearing of his third bail application at court when it seemed like Judge Arbuthnot might be persuaded to allow him out of prison on a “24-hour curfew” at his Centrepoint apartment in London. Also Read – Personal life needs to be respected: Cong on reports of Rahul’s visit abroad”A combination of interference with witnesses, destruction of servers and mobile phones and the lack of community ties means I still have doubts that he would fail to surrender before the court,” she concluded in the end. “There does seem to be a luring away of witnesses (to Egypt) and some pressure that took witnesses away from India,” she noted, making specific reference to a transcript of a conversation which indicated that Modi may have been using his US-based brother Nehal Modi to do his “dirty work as it were”. In the judge’s own words, Modi’s barrister Clare Montgomery made a “compelling” argument against his continued imprisonment while he awaits trial in his extradition case and submitted that her client was willing to abide by any stringent conditions as long as he did not have to be lodged in the “unliveable” Wandsworth prison cell. “His experience in custody has been vivid and damaging,” said Montgomery, as she sought to counter the evidence put forward by the Indian authorities. A team from the Enforcement Directorate (ED) and Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) as well as the High Commission of India were present in court. PTIlast_img read more

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Mike Trout And Bryce Harper Are Baseballs Best Young PositionPlayer Duo Ever

Mike Trout and Bryce Harper, by consensus the most talented young position players in baseball, are facing off this week for the first time in their burgeoning careers. (Trout’s Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim got the best of Harper’s Washington Nationals on Monday night, 4-2.)Few youngsters arrived in the majors with as much buildup as Harper, who graced the cover of Sports Illustrated at age 16. Luckily for the Nationals, he’s mostly been as good as advertised (and he’s still just 21 years old, a fact that’s often forgotten because he’s been so good). Meanwhile, all Trout did in his first full pair of major-league seasons was turn in two of the 150 or so best position-player seasons in the past 113 years of baseball, making two strong MVP bids in the process.So, yeah, these guys have been really good, really early in their careers.With all the (deserved) hype surrounding Trout and Harper, I was wondering how the duo compares to other concurrent 22-or-under pairs of position players in the history of baseball. To answer that question, I looked at the most productive two non-pitchers age 22 or below in a given season, based on the combined number of wins above replacement they’d generated in the previous two seasons. (We can’t compare Trout/Harper through age 22 because we don’t know what they’ll do in 2014.)By that standard, Trout and Harper are the most productive young duo in baseball history. Here were the seasons featuring the best pairs of budding superstars ever (taking only the best score for duplicate pairs):The majority of those 28.2 combined WAR belong to Trout, author of the aforementioned pair of historically dominant campaigns. Let’s be honest, though: Given Trout’s otherworldly production at such a young age, we could pair him with just about anybody and he’d still be near the top of this list (Trout by himself would rank fifth). But Harper’s numbers to date hardly make him a coattail-rider. As far as No. 2s go, Harper’s 8.6 WAR ranks below only Mel Ott and Eddie Mathews as the third-best second fiddle in the history of promising under-22 duos.If we’re looking to give extra weight to No. 2s, ensuring that both players in a pair have great stats (to safeguard against a situation such as what happened in 1918, when Rogers Hornsby had 97 percent of the WAR in his “duo” with Ross Youngs), perhaps a better way to rank these kinds of pairings is not to sum up all of the WAR generated by a pair, but rather to take the harmonic mean of the two individuals’ WAR totals. If we do that, the following list emerges:By either list, though, Trout-Harper is the best young duo in baseball history. So, savor their matchup this week — you may never again see a pair of position players so good face off at such a young age. read more

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ExNFL Player Released from Team Over Gun Charge Says

Former NFL linebacker Khaseem Greene/WikipediaELIZABETH, N.J. (AP) — A former NFL linebacker says in a lawsuit that police and prosecutors in New Jersey knew a shooter had lied about getting a weapon from the player but charged him anyway.A gun charge against Khaseem Greene was dropped in July after an audio recording surfaced of the other man telling detectives he lied about Greene’s involvement in a shooting outside a nightclub in Elizabeth in December 2016.The Kansas City Chiefs released Greene the day charges against him were reported.The other man’s admission came the day he told detectives Greene was involved. But it wasn’t included in a criminal complaint that alleged Greene was seen on camera handing him a gun.The suit, filed Tuesday, names the Elizabeth Police Department, and the Union County Prosecutors Office. Messages seeking comment left with the agencies weren’t immediately returned. read more

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Passionate sports fans shed tears

Sports are often marginalized into just-a-game diatribes or wins-versus-losses arguments. But sports are so much more than that. They can spawn any sort of emotion imaginable. One day they might elicit 1,000-watt smiles. Other days they generate self-induced purgatory. Here’s a timeline of some sentiments I’ve experienced because of sports in my hometown of Cincinnati, just in the past year. Last season, the Bengals underwent a season of incredible triumph and indescribable tragedy. When defensive coordinator Mike Zimmer came home Oct. 9, 2009, he found his wife dead. Vikki Zimmer had died of natural causes. Just three days later, Zimmer watched from the sidelines as his defense held Baltimore scoreless for three-and-a-half quarters and the Bengals pulled out a narrow victory against the Ravens. If your eyes didn’t well up when the players handed Zimmer the ball in the locker room after the game or when he told the team, “She’s up there now in heaven smiling at you,” you might want to check your pulse. Not too long after that, wide receiver Chad Ochocinco made me cry on two separate occasions. How did perhaps the most outlandish and self-serving wide receiver in the game today kick-start my tear ducts? On Dec. 16, 2009, word began rolling into Cincinnati that Chad’s teammate and good friend Chris Henry had fallen out of a moving pickup truck driven by his fiancée. Henry died the next day. Reporters interviewed Ochocinco at his locker shortly after the news of Henry’s death reached the team. He talked about how Henry, one of the prime violators of the NFL’s personal conduct policy, had done a 180 with his life. How he had turned the corner. How he was focused on his family. Then with tears slowly consuming his eyes, Ochocinco questioned the “man upstairs” about why he had to take Henry. As a man with uncertain faith because of deaths in my own family, Ochocinco struck a chord with me. As I sat and watched Ochocinco talk about his friend, our two faces soon became one as I, too, mourned Henry. Tears streamed down my face like raindrops running down a windowsill. A few days later, the Bengals visited San Diego. In the second quarter, Ochocinco beat Charger cornerback Antonio Cromartie on a double move for a long touchdown reception. It was a streak down the sideline that Bengals fans saw from Henry on occasion. When he reached the end zone, Ochocinco gingerly dropped to one knee and gazed at the sky. He got up and walked back to the sideline, the “king of end-zone celebrations,” dethroned by the aching in his soul. When the cameras zoomed in on his face, Ochocinco’s expression was clear. So was mine. I sat in front of my television and, like Ochocinco, I wept for Chris Henry, a man I’d never met before in my life. When I attended the Bengals’ playoff game last season, I could feel the (cue sports-writing clichés) electricity in the city walking to Paul Brown Stadium. When “Welcome to the Jungle” blared through the stadium speakers as the team sprinted out through the tunnel, goose bumps covered my body. I felt as if I was in a sports twilight zone, immersed in a crowd of buoyant pandemonium. The great thing about growing up in Cincinnati is that we not only have the Bengals, but we also have the Cincinnati Reds. This summer a Cuban missile landed in my fair city. Aroldis Chapman, the 22-year-old with the 100-plus fastball and $30-million arm, made his long-awaited Cincinnati Reds debut Aug. 31. I was as giddy as kid on Christmas morning. I wasn’t even in the ballpark, yet I could close my eyes and hear the roar of the masses as the long-legged phenom strode to the mound. Nervous anticipation filled my body as he warmed up, like I was in a hospital waiting room awaiting the birth of my first child. Then he came, he saw and he conquered. Milwaukee Brewers hitters were helpless against him. He made professional hitters look ordinary, like little leaguers flailing at their first curveball. If they blinked, they would miss his 103-mph fastball entirely, only hearing the hiss of the ball crossing the corner of the plate and into the catcher’s mitt. I sat on my couch and was flabbergasted. It wasn’t a “wow” moment. It wasn’t even a “holy s—” moment. It was a leap-off-the-couch, jump-around-like-a-5-year-old, call-your-buddy-and-yell, “Did you see that slider start on the outside corner of the strike zone and almost hit the batter in the foot?” type of moment. That’s what sports can deliver. In less than a year. To one city. read more

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