Ohio Ag Weather and Forecast — November 21, 2017

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Ryan Martin 11-21-17Dry today with strong southwest winds developing over the state. Winds are expected to reach 15-30 mph at times through the day. But, the southwest flow will allow temps to moderate further, and we should see temps today above normal.A cold front moves through this evening through the overnight tonight. We still think the precipitation threat is very low, but clouds look to be persistent. That, combined with the big change in air mass is prompting us to keep a few sprinkles or light snow flakes in over the state overnight into tomorrow morning. The best threat of action will be in north central and northeast OH, where we can see some light snow, but we won’t rule a little precipitation out anywhere. The key word is “little”…as available moisture looks to be limited to a few hundredths to at most .1”. So, anything that happens will be rather inconsequential. Still, the bigger story will probably be the dramatic fall off in temps again, with tomorrow and Thanksgiving Day ending up below normal. Winds will likely be strong out of the northwest tomorrow. The map above shows temps as they compare to normal for Thanksgiving afternoon.No change in the rest of the forecast. The roller coaster decides to go back up hill from late Thursday night through the rest of the week and weekend. Temperatures climb for Friday with strong southwest winds returning to the region. We should see above normal highs for Friday and Saturday statewide. Again, we go through these temp changes with no precipitation.Our Sunday disturbance is coming a little faster, and may be in on Saturday afternoon. At this time, it appears to be a strong low that passes well to our north, over Michigan and into southern Ontario. This may drag some clouds down into northern Ohio Saturday into Sunday, but we are keeping the region mostly free of precipitation. You might see a spit or sprinkle north of US 30, but even that does not look overly impressive. Colder air does wrap around the backside of the low and cool us back down to below normal levels for late Sunday afternoon and the start of nextThe next good threat of precipitation develops at midweek next week. On Wednesday, the 29th, we see nice moisture moving in from the west. However, models are less enthusiastic about this system this morning than they were 24 hours ago. We are leaving our forecast alone at this time, but may have to revise it lower if we see any other consensus building For now, we will look for.2”-.6” of moisture over 80% of the state. This front should move through relatively quickly.last_img read more

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Team Austria Wins 2013 Solar Decathlon

first_imgTeam Austria from the Vienna University of Technology captured first place at the 2013 Solar Decathlon competition with a demonstration solar house it called LISI, for “Living Inspired by Sustainable Innovation.”The Austrian students were among 19 teams from colleges and universities in the U.S., Canada, and Europe taking part in the 10-day event at the Orange County Great Park in Irvine, California. Students designed and built the energy-efficient demonstration houses and then competed in 10 separate areas; judges weighed architecture, engineering, affordability, and energy use, among other categories.In general, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) says, judges looked for houses that are affordable and attractive, maintain comfortable and healthy indoor environments, provide enough hot water, and produce as much energy as, or more energy than, they consume.Team Austria emerged as the winner on October 12 with a cumulative total of 951 points, a scant 4 points ahead of the University of Nevada Las Vegas and only 7 points ahead of the third-place finisher, the Czech Technical University. The University of North Carolina at Charlotte won the “People’s Choice Award.” The DOE posted all of the results and photographs of the entries at its web site.The Solar Decathlon was launched in 2002 and is now run every two years. Until this year, it had taken place on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. DesertSol designed for harsh climateDesertSol, the entry from the University of Nevada Las Vegas, is suited to the harsh conditions of the Mojave Desert, the student team writes, and is designed to qualify for a LEED Platinum rating. Following the Decathlon, the house was to become a permanent feature of the Las Vegas Springs Preserve, a 180-acre park that attracts more than 280,000 visitors a year.Among the features of the house:A rigid foundation made of steel I-beams and purlins that elminate the need for conventional floor framing.Advanced framing techniques to reduce the use of wood.A roof-mounted, grid-tied photovoltaic system.An exterior of reclaimed silverwood, which the team said is “reminiscent of the old mining towns of the Mojave Desert.”Ductless minisplit heat pumps for heating and cooling.A water collection system that captures rainwater and uses it for evaporative cooling as well as landscape irrigation.A solar thermal system for domestic hot water.The team lists products used in the house — everything from the make and model of appliances to the mechanical equipment and lights — in its project description. A house called LISIAccording to a summary provided by Team Austria, its wood-framed house consists of three separate zones: a service core, a living area, and adjacent patios. The patios, which can be enclosed, are designed to double the net living area. “LISI offers private outdoor areas, which allow residents to experience nature within their own home,” the team says.Students designers proposed marketing the design as either a cottage for small urban lots or as a “contemporary chalet” for mountain or lakeside resort developments.Following the competition in California, the Austrian team was invited to show the house at Austria’s largest model-home exhibition site where some 100 manufacturers show prefabricated house designs, the energy department said.Among other features in LISI:An automated screen and awning system to provide shade and keep the house comfortable.Roof-mounted photovoltaic panels that provide an annual energy surplus that could be used to recharge electric vehicles.A centrally located utility room that houses equipment for ventilation, plumbing, and hot water.Two high-efficiency heat pumps that supply hot and cold water for heating and cooling as well as domestic hot water.Cellulose insulation.A heat-recovery tray in the shower that captures energy from drain water.center_img People’s Choice award winnerUrbanEden, the entry from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, was designed as an urban infill dwelling that would appeal to young professionals and empty-nesters, the project description says. After the Decathlon, the house was headed back to the UNC campus where it will be a living laboratory.The team was especially proud of the insulated precast wall panels of “geopolymer” concrete, which is made with fly ash instead of portland cement to reduce its carbon footprint. Embedded inside the walls are small-diameter tubes. During the summer, water is pumped through the tubes at night, carrying heat absorbed during the day to heat exchangers on the roof to cool the house. Panels are made with two layers of concrete that sandwich a 6-in. layer of rigid EPS insulation.The roof is insulated with 10 inches of XPS rigid insulation; the floor was designed with 6 inches of XPS foam (although when reassembled in California, parts of the floor system were insulated with R-19 fiberglass batts). The house is designed to eliminate most thermal bridging.UrbanEden’s 7.65-kW photovoltaic modules are arranged on an adjustable track on the roof. During the summer, the racks can be moved so they shade the deck and the southern wall of the house. In winter, panels are retracted to allow the sun to provide heat and light through south-facing glass.Other features as described by the design team:Triple-pane windows manufactured by Intus.An interactive energy management system that displays energy use in the house as well as PV production.An energy-recovery ventilator to provide fresh air.Rainwater collection that directs water to reflecting pools and ultimately to plants inside and outside the house.A vertical Wallgarden that can be used to grow flowers or vegetables.Minisplit heat pumps for heating and to supplement the cooling capacity of the capillary wall system.last_img read more

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Jammu and Kashmir police stripped of ‘prosecution’ wing

first_imgIn the new Union Territory (UT) of Jammu and Kashmir, the police have been stripped of the “prosecution” wing. Earlier, police officers could appear in magisterial courts as public prosecutors. The arrangement stands quashed now.The order has caused consternation among J&K police officers, who claim this was done to take away their powers and a “middle ground” is being worked out.As per the directions of the Centre, a separate Directorate of Prosecution has been sanctioned by an order of the J&K administration on October 30 that will not include police officers.Earlier, this wing was headed by an officer of the rank of Deputy Inspector General.The J&K police website said the wing supervised and dealt with “all the departmental litigations viz writs, appeals, civil suits, claim petitions, special leave petitions, contempt pleas, criminal prosecution etc.”In the UT of Delhi, the police function through the Department of Prosecution under the Delhi government.On November 6, a public interest litigation (PIL) petition was filed before the Jammu Division Bench of J&K High Court challenging the order.“It was a different set up in J&K, like other important organisations like the CBI. The prosecution wing was working as part of police. It was a dual system, where police officers could appear in Magistrate Court as prosecution lawyers. In higher courts, we used to engage public prosecutors,” said a senior J&K official.Position in other partsThe J&K High Court has asked the UT of J&K to for a counter affidavit to be filed within four weeks. It also gave a direction to examine the position in other parts of the country to see if the process of appointing police officers as prosecutors existed anywhere else.J&K Director General of Police Dilbag Singh said the prosecution wing functioned under the Police Act, 1983. “A PIL has been filed in the J&K High Court… our officers had the mandate to appear in lower courts, we will continue to have a legal wing.”last_img read more

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