Manitoba inquest exposes repeated failures to fix substandard policing in Indigenous communities

first_imgCara McKenna APTN National NewsThe inquest into the death of a northern Manitoba First Nations man who suffered heart failure while he was crammed in a tiny holding cell has exposed repeated failures to fix substandard policing in Indigenous communities.Brian McPherson, 44, a diabetic, died during a series of incidents involving untrained or insufficiently trained police officers and an inadequate jail in the Garden Hill First Nation, Man., in 2011.An inquiry into his death began in October 2013 in Garden Hill and ended last June in Winnipeg.The inquest report, released Friday, condemns the provincial and federal governments for continually failing to adequately fund and standardize First Nations policing despite a number of other previous inquest reports and studies suggesting changes.Manitoba Provincial Court Judge Malcolm McDonald has made 12 recommendations that mostly focus around fixing inadequate funding to First Nations police services and establishing proper facilities, training and safety measures.The inquest heard that Garden Hill was operating an unauthorized jail and Ottawa had cut funding for its band constable program shortly before McPherson’s death because the community failed to provide a proper financial audit.In 2006, Garden Hill had also applied to a federal-provincial First Nations police force program that was the remote community’s only viable option. It was denied.On the night of his death in late August, McPherson and a number of other people were gathered at a home in Garden Hill, which is designated as a dry community.The inquest heard band Coun. Wayne Harper ordered Garden Hill’s Const. Shannon Beardy and three untrained volunteer assistants to go inside and arrest anyone who had “superjuice” – a potent home brew that is common in remote communities.Beardy and one of the volunteer police assistants, Douglas Flett, testified that they did not think anyone was causing problems and would not have detained anyone if not for the order.Beardy also told the inquest that she was given no training prior to starting as constable in 2011, and that she quit her job the next year because she was always angry.That night, as many as 30 people were held at Garden Hill’s public safety building, with McPherson and at least seven others packed into a tiny cell.The inquest heard that the cell block was run down, had no bedding and was only about nine square metres in size. Cardboard and duct tape covered the windows so no one could see inside.Three guards on duty had as little as 20 minutes of training before handling prisoners and could only see inside the cells through low-res black and white video monitors that didn’t transmit sound.McPherson was found dead the next morning by another prisoner, though the inquest report acknowledges that he likely would have died that night regardless of where he was.He left behind two children and his partner Ann Monias, who described McPherson as a gentle character who had ongoing health problems.cmckenna@aptn.calast_img read more

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March 8 2017More about the concrete work on a new

first_imgMarch 8, 2017More about the concrete work on a new countertop for the bathroom in East Housing. Tomiaki checks the surface for any imperfections. Here are Randall, Ron Chandler and Tomiaki.[photos by Sue Kirsch]You can see previous reports with the following links:The countertop is layed out in back of the Lab building. Woodshop manager Randall Schultz explains how the finishing will proceed.The countertop is now in the paint studio where Randall sanded the surface and used a filler for any holes.A closer look of the surface.The last step will be to stain and seal the surface. We will report when the work is complete.last_img read more

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Liberty Global wants to migrate as much of its TV

first_imgLiberty Global wants to migrate as much of its TV platform as possible to the cloud as this becomes increasingly practical, according to Mourand Veeneman, vice-president, technology at Liberty Global.Delivering the second keynote presentation on day two of TV Connect, Veeneman said that  cloud-based systems were becoming more practical, and that teething problems such as latency would ultimately disappear.“We want to bring everything that we can to the cloud,” said Veeneman. “There is talk about latency [and other problems] but that all will go away,” he said. Liberty Global wants to move “everything to the cloud” ultimately, he added.Veeneman said LG was investing a lot in its own cloud infrastructure. “We still like to control things ourselves,” he said.More generally, Veeneman told attendees that IP is the key to convergence and multiplatform user engagement. “IP is the only thing that really brings everything together. All devices are now IP. We have mobile phones and tablets and they are all IP-based,” he said.Veeneman said Liberty Global would look to develop  mobile products this year. He said that WiFi was becoming more important both within the home and outside it as a means to deliver video services to multiple devices.“WiFi is becoming a very important way of distributing multimedia in the house,” he said.However, WiFi remains problematic and there will likely be a need for more spectrum in the future to delvier video service wirelessly, he said. While offloading mobile video to WiFi is currently widespread, the rollout of LTE could ultimately provide a better distribution platform, said Veeneman.Veeneman also said that microprocessors were becoming smaller and the reduction in power required for improved performance would continue. “Less is the new more,” said Veeneman. This meant that set-tops would continue to get smaller, while mprovements in Flash memory meant that liberty Global had achieved a 50% reducion in standard storage rack space and a 78% reduction in power consumption, he said.last_img read more

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