HTC details the impressive Vive Cosmos

first_img Up close with the HTC Vive Pro HTC $499 Mobile Mobile Accessories Gaming Accessories Gaming Video Games Virtual Reality Apps Mentioned Above HTC Vive The info follows HTC last week unveiling the look of the Vive Cosmos, which will come with a flip-up design, six cameras, detachable headphones, a faceplate and a vented front. Billed as a premium PC VR system, the Cosmos, first teased at CES 2019 in Las Vegas in January, will have “striking graphics [and] lifelike sound,” HTC said Friday.The company also touted its new tracking system. 1:47 Review • HTC Vive review: Yes, this is the best VR experience, if you’ve got the space “With wide and accurate tracking, gesture controls and a six-degrees-of-freedom (6DoF) headset and controller setup, Vive Cosmos promises a deeply engaging VR experience,” HTC said.The system can be used straight out of the box with minimal setup and also features a more comfortable headset with soft, light and breathable material, HTC said. The company also unveiled new Vive controllers that it called gamer-friendly, versatile and practical. Post a comment Now playing: Watch this: See It 0 Walmartcenter_img 9 Photos The Vive Cosmos display is 88% higher res than HTC’s original VR headset. HTC HTC has revealed a few more details about its upcoming Vive Cosmos, calling the virtual reality headset its “most impressive” yet. The Cosmos will enable VR at 90 frames per second, and a display with 88% higher resolution than the original HTC Vive.The LCD display will have a 2880×1700 combined resolution. It’ll also have real RGB panels and more subpixels for 40% improved lens clarity over its original VR headset.It also comes with a swappable faceplate, so you can update it with future versions. Still no word on when it will launch, or how much it will cost. CNET may get a commission from retail offers. HTC Vive Pro Eye tracks your eyes with pinpoint accuracy,… Share your voice $689 HTC Vive Preview • Here’s what it’s like to use the HTC Vive, the $799 VR headset that you can preorder today VR games you need to start playing right away Tags See it VR games on CNETlast_img read more

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Red State Blue Cities Local Control Battles Set To Dominate Special Session

first_img To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: 00:00 /03:58 Share Xcenter_img There’s a long tradition in conservative Texas politics of keeping big government out of people’s lives. We heard Lieutenant Governor Dan Patrick make that point at last year’s state Republican convention. Patrick explained his opposition to the Obama administration’s transgender “bathroom” rules, saying, “This has everything to do with keeping the federal government out of local issues.”Over the years, that same custom often meant state officials left it up to local ones to decide what was best for their communities. But that tradition may be changing.This past March, Republican Senator Lois Kolkhorst introduced Senate Bill 6 at a committee hearing in Austin, saying the bill, “makes several changes in the law designed to increase privacy and protections in our locker rooms, showers, changing rooms, dressing rooms, and our restrooms.”SB 6, also known as the bathroom bill, sounded an awful lot like the Obama rule, in that it was telling local governments who could use which restroom or locker in a school building.The Texas bathroom bill died at the end of the legislative session. But the Legislature did pass other “preemptive laws,” laws that allow the state to preempt local control. The most controversial, the so-called Sanctuary Cities law, allows the state to remove local officials from office if they refuse to enforce federal immigration laws. And preemptive bills, including a revived bathroom bill, make up more than a third of Governor Greg Abbott’s agenda for the upcoming special session.“The governor has decided to make the issue of local control a primary sort of focal point,” says Jay Aiyer, assistant professor of political science at Texas Southern University. “The idea of stopping an expansive, socially expansive local government plays well for his political base. It never has hurt a Republican politician to go after the city of Austin, for example.”Not all such conflicts are as simple as a GOP-led state governments taking on majority Democratic cities. In fact, some Republican officials have a big problem with this trend.“Being in my sixties and having been in and out of politics for a long time, the conservative point of view was always, ‘Government closest to the people is best.’ Local control,” says Harris County Judge Ed Emmett.Judge Emmett parts company with Governor Abbott over one of Abbott’s top priorities for the special session, restricting property tax increases. Emmett is no fan of property taxes. But they are the only means Texas allows counties for raising revenue.“Harris County has over 2 million people who live in unincorporated Harris County,” says the judge. “We’re responsible for the roads, the parks, animal control, all that activity. Compare that to Dallas County, where they have fewer than 10,000 people in unincorporated Dallas County. So to do a one-size-fits-all tax plan doesn’t make any sense.”Then there’s the issue of tree ordinances, specifically those that let cities bar property owners from cutting down trees on their own land. Abbott wants a bill to override such ordinances. That would affect not only Austin, but also Emmett’s neighborhood of West University Place.“You know, West University Place has a pretty clear regulation of trees that need to be protected,” says Emmett. “The state somehow seems to think they should come in and make that decision for everybody in the state. I just don’t think that’s right, and I think it flies in the face of conservative principled government.”In many ways, Emmett’s and Abbott’s positions reflect a divide in the Texas GOP. That divide is one reason several of the preemptive bills that will come before the special session didn’t pass during the regular session. Stuart Seeger via Flickr Listenlast_img read more

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