San Antonio Fosters Cybersecurity Cluster

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR San Antonio is cultivating the largest military and civilian federal cybersecurity hub outside the Washington metro region, marked by growth in the number of companies serving the market and highly-rated university programs, according to the San Antonio Economic Development Foundation.The military components of the city’s cybersecurity cluster are anchored by the 24th and 25th Air Force at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, and the National Security Agency Texas. The 24th Air Force safeguards key components of DOD’s information networks and employs more than 1,300 people. U.S. Cyber Command officials last year said up to 1,000 additional personnel will be coming to San Antonio in the next three years to support the department’s cybersecurity mission.“The strength of San Antonio’s cybersecurity industry is evident in the community’s commitment to grow and foster a sector for which it is ideally suited,” said John Dickson, principal at the San Antonio-based Denim Group. “Locally based companies are continuing to grow at a rate of 30 percent per year and innovative technologies are the result,” Dickson said.The city’s cybersecurity cluster is supported by more than 200 companies, including all major defense contractors and 100 local cybersecurity firms. San Antonio’s established military operations, along with academic programs at area universities, and talent and business incubators are helping the cybersecurity industry flourish in San Antonio.  “San Antonio is a breeding ground for cybersecurity resources, a place where technologies are being developed and enhanced to defend the nation, and a work force is being built to support the cybersecurity technology industry — the fastest growing area of advanced technology investment in the world,” said Mario Hernandez, president of the foundation.last_img read more

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HTC details the impressive Vive Cosmos

first_img Up close with the HTC Vive Pro HTC $499 Mobile Mobile Accessories Gaming Accessories Gaming Video Games Virtual Reality Apps Mentioned Above HTC Vive The info follows HTC last week unveiling the look of the Vive Cosmos, which will come with a flip-up design, six cameras, detachable headphones, a faceplate and a vented front. Billed as a premium PC VR system, the Cosmos, first teased at CES 2019 in Las Vegas in January, will have “striking graphics [and] lifelike sound,” HTC said Friday.The company also touted its new tracking system. 1:47 Review • HTC Vive review: Yes, this is the best VR experience, if you’ve got the space “With wide and accurate tracking, gesture controls and a six-degrees-of-freedom (6DoF) headset and controller setup, Vive Cosmos promises a deeply engaging VR experience,” HTC said.The system can be used straight out of the box with minimal setup and also features a more comfortable headset with soft, light and breathable material, HTC said. The company also unveiled new Vive controllers that it called gamer-friendly, versatile and practical. Post a comment Now playing: Watch this: See It 0 Walmartcenter_img 9 Photos The Vive Cosmos display is 88% higher res than HTC’s original VR headset. HTC HTC has revealed a few more details about its upcoming Vive Cosmos, calling the virtual reality headset its “most impressive” yet. The Cosmos will enable VR at 90 frames per second, and a display with 88% higher resolution than the original HTC Vive.The LCD display will have a 2880×1700 combined resolution. It’ll also have real RGB panels and more subpixels for 40% improved lens clarity over its original VR headset.It also comes with a swappable faceplate, so you can update it with future versions. Still no word on when it will launch, or how much it will cost. CNET may get a commission from retail offers. HTC Vive Pro Eye tracks your eyes with pinpoint accuracy,… Share your voice $689 HTC Vive Preview • Here’s what it’s like to use the HTC Vive, the $799 VR headset that you can preorder today VR games you need to start playing right away Tags See it VR games on CNETlast_img read more

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Samsung has 9 Galaxy phones you can buy now Heres how to

first_img The most wallet-friendly The Galaxy S10 Plus has a big 6.4-inch AMOLED screen, loads of useful camera tools and one of the longest battery times we’ve tested on phones this year, lasting an excellent 21 hours during our lab test for continuous video playback on Airplane mode. Unlike the Galaxy S10, it has two front-facing cameras instead of just one. Samsung Galaxy Fold ($1,980) The cheapest S10 phone Read more about the Note 10 Tags Angela Lang/CNET The one with the stylus but bigger and with 5G Read the Galaxy A50 review Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Plus 5G ($1,300) Sarah Tew/CNET See at Amazon The Galaxy A50 is part of Samsung’s A-series, which is much cheaper than the top tier S-series of phones. At $350, £309 or AU$500, the A50 is one of your cheapest Galaxy options and features a 6.4-inch display, an in-screen fingerprint reader and a headphone jack. On the back are three cameras that include a wide-angle lens as well as a “depth lens,” which is used to take portrait shots with blurry, dramatic backgrounds. Samsung Galaxy S10 5G ($1,300) As the most wallet-friendly Galaxy S10 phone, the $750, £669 and AU$1,199 Galaxy S10E has a lot to offer. It’s a smaller phone, which is great for those looking for a comfortable grip, and it has a super-fast Snapdragon 855 chipset and a long-lasting battery life. Like other S10 phones, it can wirelessly charge other phones and accessories, like a pair of wireless earbuds or a smartwatch. Like all of Samsung’s Galaxy S10 phones, the standard Galaxy S10 is built from the best parts. It has a wonderfully sharp screen and a long battery life. Camera quality is awesome and it comes with all the extras, including the ability to wirelessly charge another device or accessory. See at Amazon See at Amazon The one that folds, obviously Andrew Hoyle/CNET The Note 10 Plus 5G is pretty much identical to the regular Note 10 Plus but like the S10 5G, it connects to 5G networks. Because of this, the phone weighs about 2 grams heavier and is more expensive than the Note 10 Plus by $200. It will be available on the US carriers Verizon, AT&T and T-Mobile, as well as in South Korea and other international markets, but it may not be worth investing in the phone just yet. See at Amazon Read the Galaxy S10 review Read more about the Galaxy Fold The Galaxy S10 5G is Samsung’s first phone that can connect to the next-gen network of high-speed mobile data known as 5G. Initially launched on the US carrier Verizon, the Galaxy S10 5G costs $1,300, £1,099 and AU$1,999, which has a 6.7-inch display, the same four-camera setup as the Note 10 Plus and a second depth-sensing front-facing camera. The device is also available on Sprint and T-Mobile, as well as AT&T but only for business. See at Verizon Samsung’s Note 10 in an array of different colors. Andrew Hoyle/CNET Samsung doesn’t care if you already think there’s a dizzying number of Galaxy phones to keep track of. On Aug. 7, the company added more to the pile when it unveiled three Note phones, the Note 10, Note 10 Plus and Note 10 Plus 5G, which are considered to be the upper “top-tier” end of the premium phone spectrum. They join six other Galaxy phones that Samsung announced this year, bringing the total number of new Galaxy phones you can buy to nine(!). As the most unique Galaxy phone, the Galaxy Fold has a secondary 4.6-inch display that serves as its “cover.” It then opens up like a book to a 7.3-inch tablet. The Fold also has six cameras: on the back, there’s the same triple-camera setup as the Galaxy S10 and on the front a single 10-megapixel camera. In tablet form, there are two additional cameras inside: a selfie camera and an 8-megapixel depth camera.Preorders began in April, but after reports of screen breakages, flickering and, bulging with preproduction units, Samsung has delayed the Fold until September. (For more information, read CNET’s Galaxy Fold FAQ.) Because of the phone’s novel design, the Fold is the most expensive phone of the bunch, costing $1,980 (about £1,500 or AU$2,800). Angela Lang/CNET Samsung Galaxy A50 ($350) Read the Galaxy S10 Plus review Read more about the Note 10 Plus 2:08 Mobile Phones Samsung Galaxy Note 10 ($949) The one with the stylus Now playing: Watch this: Angela Lang/CNET The flagship but bigger Samsung Galaxy S10 ($900) The ‘flagship’ Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Plus ($1,100) Share your voice Angela Lang/CNET The flagship but with 5G Comments Angela Lang/CNET See at Amazon The one with the stylus but bigger Angela Lang/CNET Samsung Galaxy S10E ($750) Angela Lang/CNET Read more about the Note 10 Plus 5G 22 Read the Galaxy S10E review From budget devices and 5G phones, to one in particular that can fold in half (yes, really), we round up the latest Galaxy phones, tell you what makes them special from all the others and order them from cheapest to most expensive.Note that these products are independently chosen by our editors. CNET may get a share of revenue from the sale of products from the links. See at Amazon See at AT&T Read more about the Galaxy S10 5G As the Galaxy phone with the biggest screen (that doesn’t fold, that is), the Note 10 Plus has a huge 6.8-inch display. Like its Note 10 counterpart, it has a single front-facing camera but in addition to its three rear cameras, it has a fourth depth-sensing camera. And while it doesn’t have a headphone jack either, it does have expandable memory, unlike the Note 10. See at Amazon Samsung Galaxy S10 Plus ($1,000) 9 Samsung Galaxy phones and how to tell them apart As the standard model of Samsung’s newest line of ultraluxe phones, the Note 10 features a 6.3-inch display, three rear cameras, an in-screen fingerprint scanner and a signature S Pen stylus that can remotely control the phone’s camera via Bluetooth. It also doesn’t have a headphone jack or expandable memory. Samsunglast_img read more

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Samsung Galaxy M30 Review Behemoth battery saves the day

first_img 1/2 Samsung Galaxy M30 review: Wide angle lens test 1x normal modeIBTimes India/Sami KhanSamsung Galaxy M30 review: Wide angle lens testIBTimes India/Sami KhanPreviousNextColour reproduction in shots taken during the day is good.If you take a lot of portraits, the Live Focus does a decent job. But the edge detection is not on point while shooting humans even in well-lit conditions. See below: Samsung Galaxy M30 review: Portrait test rear cameraIBTimes India/Sami Khan Samsung Galaxy M30 review: Low-light camera testIBTimes India/Sami Khan Samsung Galaxy M30 review: Wide angle lens test 1x normal modeIBTimes India/Sami Khan IBTimes VideoRelated VideosMore videos Play VideoPauseMute0:06/0:25Loaded: 0%0:06Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE-0:19?Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedSubtitlessubtitles settings, opens subtitles settings dialogsubtitles off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window. COPY LINKAD Loading … Samsung Galaxy M30 review: Low-light camera testIBTimes India/Sami Khan Samsung has stepped up its game in a big way in the affordable smartphone segment and the Galaxy M30 is living proof of that. While the smartphone giant continues to face an imminent threat from Xiaomi, which is dominating budget smartphone sales in India, the Galaxy M30 could save the day.Samsung Galaxy M30 was launched in India in February as the company’s response to the growing popularity of Xiaomi Redmi Note 7 Pro. Priced at Rs 14,990, the Galaxy M30 shipped to us for review comes with 4GB RAM and 64GB storage. There’s also a 6GB+128GB model, but it costs Rs 17,990, so we chose to test the base model that is likely to gain more traction in India.Before we get to the final impressions of the device, here’s what the Galaxy M30 offers.Display: 6.14-inch Super AMOLED Full HD+ Infinity-U displayMain Camera: 13MP (f/1.9) + 5MP (f/2.2) + 5MP (123-degree ultra-wide) lenses on backSecondary camera: 16MP sensor with selfie focusChipset: Exynos 7904 14nm 1.8GHz octa-core CPURAM: 4GBStorage: 64GB, expandable storage via dedicated microSD card (up to 512GB)Battery: 5,000mAh with 15W fast charging supportOS: Android 8.1 Oreo-based Samsung Experience 9.5 UIAdd-ons: Fingerprint scanner, face unlock, dual SIM card support, and moreHere’s how Samsung Galaxy M30 stacks up against its reputation.Design & DisplaySamsung Galaxy M30 benefits hugely from the Super AMOLED display that gives a bright and crisp output. The Infinity-U design is basically a round notch up top, which doesn’t occupy much space and delivers a large screen real-estate. The display output is the best in its price range, so if you’re a multimedia buff then the Galaxy M30 is a right fit. 1/3 Samsung Galaxy M30 reviewIBTimes India/Sami KhanSamsung Galaxy M30 reviewIBTimes India/Sami KhanSamsung Galaxy M30 reviewIBTimes India/Sami KhanPreviousNextBut it’s worth pointing out that the polycarbonate back doesn’t feel as premium as glass, but keeps smudges at bay and offers a solid non-slippery grip. The handset sports a USB Type-C port at the bottom, alongside speaker and 3.5mm headphone jack. The volume rockers are placed on the higher end of the side, which may be difficult to reach at once, the same is the case for the rear-mounted fingerprint scanner. 1/2 Samsung Galaxy M30 reviewIBTimes India/Sami KhanSamsung Galaxy M30 reviewIBTimes India/Sami KhanPreviousNext Samsung Galaxy M30 review: Low-light front camera testIBTimes India/Sami KhanThere’s a wide angle lens in the setup as well, but having used some of the best wide-angle cameras, the Galaxy M30 could use some improvement. But I would like to cut some slack here as the effort is genuine and the price range is not even close to what I’m comparing with. As long as you want to capture landscapes, the wide-angle shots will look as dramatic as they can be, but trying to squeeze in more subjects in the wide angle frame is not such a good idea as the edges will get distorted. See the image below: Samsung Galaxy M30 review: Wide angle lens testIBTimes India/Sami Khan Samsung Galaxy M30 reviewIBTimes India/Sami KhanThe gradient finish on the back, though, is a classy finish. It looks elegant, not too flashy or loud as in the case of some phones.CameraSamsung Galaxy M30 packs a punch here. There’s a triple camera setup at the back and a single 16MP selfie snapper. Both work to their full potential and fulfil needs of those Instagram-savvy users.During the day, Samsung Galaxy M30 delivers its best results with the right detailing, contrast and colours. During the night, the details are lost completely. If you simply want to capture the city lights from your high-rise apartment to share it on Instagram, you’ll be disappointed to look at the results. 1/3 Samsung Galaxy M30 review: Low-light camera testIBTimes India/Sami KhanSamsung Galaxy M30 review: Low-light camera testIBTimes India/Sami KhanSamsung Galaxy M30 review: Low-light camera testIBTimes India/Sami KhanPreviousNext Samsung Galaxy M30 review: Portrait test front cameraIBTimes India/Sami KhanSamsung Galaxy M30 has good focus speed during the day, whereas low-light focusing will require some manual input. Check out some of the results straight from Galaxy M30’s camera roll below: 1/5 Samsung Galaxy M30 review: Normal camera modeIBTimes India/Sami KhanSamsung Galaxy M30 review: Normal camera modeIBTimes India/Sami KhanSamsung Galaxy M30 review: Normal camera modeIBTimes India/Sami KhanSamsung Galaxy M30 review: Normal camera modeIBTimes India/Sami KhanSamsung Galaxy M30 review: Normal camera modeIBTimes India/Sami KhanPreviousNextSamsung Galaxy M30’s selfies are better than expected. I had high expectations from the rear setup, but the front camera does a good job at taking selfies in all conditions.  Samsung Galaxy M30 review: Portrait test front cameraIBTimes India/Sami KhanPerformanceSamsung Galaxy M30 is not exactly the best performing phone out there, but its largely due to the dating Experience 9.5 UI based on Android 8.1 Oreo. The interface is laggy at times with delayed response rate, but running of multiple apps, mild gaming, streaming and social media browsing is handled like any other budget smartphone. There are some unwanted apps pre-loaded on the phone and Samsung suggests more to download, but you can skip them. Samsung Galaxy M30 reviewIBTimes India/Sami KhanThe Exynos chipset in the Galaxy M30 with the 4GB RAM works great for day-to-day tasks and multitasking and mild gaming doesn’t cause any problem. In fact, playing PUBG Mobile with medium graphics setting is also possible on this budget smartphone for those who want to get on the PUBG-craze. We did not experience any app crashes or freezing of the phone when running multiple apps. The facial recognition works extremely well and the fingerprint scanner is efficient. Overall, it is a decent phone, but power users will find a better fit with the Redmi Note 7 Pro (Review).BatteryThe one thing where Samsung Galaxy M30 really makes an impact is the battery. The 5,000mAh battery in the handset is a generous offering, but it is surprising considering the slim and handy design. The USB Type-C port and 15W fast charging is a worthy addition, which means users won’t have to wait for hours to get the M30 fully charged. But don’t expect it to be too quick as it would take at least 2 hours to fully boost the phone to 100 percent battery. Samsung Galaxy M30 reviewIBTimes India/Sami KhanAs for battery life, things get really impressive. Samsung Galaxy M30 manages power extremely well. Be it playing games, streaming videos or browsing and making calls, the Galaxy M30 will easily last you a full day with high usage. With mixed and moderate use, expect the M30 to deliver a day and a half on a single charge, which is quite impressive. Samsung Galaxy M30 reviewIBTimes India/Sami KhanThere are different power saving modes as well, which work just as great to further add more minutes to the battery life in the final few stages.VerdictIf you’re looking for excellent battery life in a smartphone, Samsung Galaxy M30 is the right choice. With average performance and a remarkable battery, display and design, you get a good package for under Rs 15,000. Sure, Xiaomi Redmi Note 7 Pro gives a tough fight, but this smartphone is for those who are used to Samsung’s interface, don’t want the glitter and shine, and are willing to settle on the camera use. Is Redmi Note 7 the new-age Nokia 3310? Closelast_img read more

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Tata Motors will look to turn around India ops focus on CV

first_imgClose Saying that it is making an “earnest effort to turn profitable” after India’s largest truckmaker posted standalone losses for four straight quarters, Tata Motors Chairman N Chandrasekaran said on Tuesday that the domestic business, particularly the CV segment has suffered due to a challenging environment as also the company’s sub-optimal execution and market misses.An Economic Times (ET) report said on Tuesday that Chandrasekaran, who was addressing shareholders of the company at a AGM for the first time after taking over as chairman, expressed regret over the company’s inability to pay dividends due to losses incurred by its domestic business and said it is working “with tremendous urgency” to deal with the matter.”I know that from a shareholder’s perspective it is disappointing that the company has been unable to pay a dividend in light of its significant losses in the standalone business,” Chandrasekaran said. Tata Motors is working with “tremendous urgency” to remedy the situation, he said, while trying to reassure the shareholders, the financial website Moneycontrol.com reported on Tuesday.”Looking ahead, we expect the business environment to remain dynamic and unpredictable. Our clear focus is the turnaround of the domestic business,” he said at Tata Motors’ Annual General Meeting here today.”I am optimistic about the future – it may be challenging but at the same time, it offers many positive opportunities for both Tata Motors and Jaguar Land Rover,” Chandrasekaran said. Showroom attendants polish a Jaguar vehicle at a Jaguar Land Rover showroom in Mumbai. Tata Motors, which owns the Jaguar brand, said on Tuesday that the company’s commercial vehicles business has faced a challenging and uncertain environment this year due to changeover to the GST regime, demonetisation and an unexpected Supreme Court ruling on BS 3 to BS 4 migration. REUTERS/Vivek Prakash (INDIA – Tags: BUSINESS TRANSPORT)ReutersMoneycontrol noted that Chandrasekaran’s comments were along the lines of a roadmap laid out by the automobile maker’s management. Tata Motors Managing Director and Chief Executive Officer Guenter Butschek had said on Monday that the company planned to cut costs, focus on new launches and improve supply chain in order to turn the standalone business profitable in the current financial year.Chandrasekaran said that in 2016-17, Tata Motors’ standalone gross revenues was at Rs 49,100 crore, up 3.6 per cent from the previous year. The loss after tax, on a standalone basis, was Rs 2,480 crore compared to Rs 62 crore in the previous year.Challenging prospects for CV businessThe ET report said that Chandrasekaran pointed out reasons for the dismal performance of the company’s domestic business. The commercial vehicles (CV) business faced a challenging and uncertain environment due to changeover to the GST regime, demonetisation and “unexpected Supreme Court ruling on BS 3 to BS 4 migration”, he was reported as saying.”On the other hand, the company’s performance also suffered due to sub-optimal execution and market misses. We have continued to lose market share in the commercial vehicles business, reaching 44.4 per cent in March this year from a high of nearly 60 per cent, five years back,” he said in the ET report.Chandrasekaran noted that Tata Motors’ CV volumes have remained more or less constant at around 3,20,000 vehicles, over the past three years, while the operating costs have gone up over time. This had impacted the performance of the company this year. On plans to reverse the situation, Chandrasekaran was quoted by ET as saying, “In CV, we are focused on ensuring that all product launches happen within our laid down timelines without any delay, changing the trajectory of our market share curve and start gaining market share, and serious cost improvement plan.”The management team is working on these on a priority basis, he said, adding that the team led by Guenter Butschek is working together to deliver a strong execution led operating performance. Tata Sons Chairman N Chandrasekaran says that Tata Motors is streamlining the end-to-end visibility of its supply chain and focusing on accelerating the timeline of delivery of new products to the market. ” width=”660″ height=”auto” tw=”1200″ th=”840″ />Tata Sons Chairman N Chandrasekaran says that Tata Motors is streamlining the end-to-end visibility of its supply chain and focusing on accelerating the timeline of delivery of new products to the market. On the passenger vehicles segment, he was quoted as saying that the company has improved its domestic market share but costs have been going up due to investments in current and future portfolios.”We are excited by the prospects of Nexon, which we will launch in September this year,” Chandrasekaran said. Tata Nexon: All you need to know last_img read more

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Number 999 receives 125000 phone calls since 12 Dec

first_imgThe toll-free national emergency services number ‘999’ has been drawing growing response since its inception on 12 December as around 20,833 people across the country on average sought toll free services from it every day.”After the formal launching of this service till 12 midnight on 17 December, it received some 125,000 phone calls over the last six days,” Assistant Inspector General (AIG) of police, in charge of the public relations and media wing at the Police Headquarters, Soheli Ferdous told BSS.She informed the national news agency that out of those 1.25 lakh phone calls reaching this service, there was no response from some 70,000 calls on the other end of the phones. Besides, some 18,100 service seekers sought answers of their various questions while there were some 13,002 missed calls.AIG Soheli Ferdous said some 400 people sought various kinds of services like resisting child marriages as well as on issues like gambling, cyber crime, eve teasing, snatching, killings, abduction, rape, fire incidents. Besides, some police personnel also sought services from ‘999’ hot number.She said anyone from any place within the country can seek help for three emergency services-ambulance, police and the Fire Service and Civil Defense – using both mobile and land phone.The ambulance service, however, will not be free.Soheli Ferdous said some prank calls are also coming to this service alongside genuine calls. “But, those who give irritating calls, message will be conveyed to them that their information is being preserved and legal action will be taken against those who will give such irritating call on regular basis,” she said.Earlier on 12 December, prime minister’s ICT affairs adviser Sajeeb Wazed Joy inaugurated the expanded national emergency services at a function in the capital’s National Control and Command Centre well-known as police control room through using toll-free hotline number ‘999’ across the country.The number – 999- is an official emergency telephone number used in a number of countries around the world allowing the caller to contact emergency services for urgent assistance.A dedicated call centre has already been set up at the police control room to provide the services.After ringing the “999”, the caller has to keep their phone on for further inquiries by police.last_img read more

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Fractal wire patterns enhance stretchability of electronic devices

first_img The researchers, Jonathan A. Fan, et al., from institutions in the US, China, Korea, and Singapore, have published a paper on the benefits of fractal wire patterns for stretchable electronics in a recent issue of Nature Communications.In general, a main challenge in designing stretchable electronics is maintaining good electronic functionality while enabling stretching of up to twice the normal device size. Some of the most successful approaches to achieving both of these goals involve combining two separate components: a hard component that provides high conductivity and a soft component that provides mechanical stretchability. The dual-component nature of these devices raises the question of how hard and soft materials can be ideally integrated.The results of the new study show that fractal patterns offer a promising approach to hard-soft materials integration, and suggest that fractal patterns can influence the mechanical properties of 2D materials. In the new devices, the hard metal wires are engineered into fractal designs and then bonded to soft elastomers.”We have established an approach, with general utility, for configuring hard materials with soft ones, in ways that have immediate relevance in all areas of stretchable electronics,” coauthor John Rogers, Professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, told Phys.org. “The resulting properties also provide advanced capabilities in stretchable/conformal devices and sensors, not only electronic, but photonic, optoelectronic and photovoltaic as well.” (Phys.org) —Fractals—patterns defined by their scale-invariance that makes them look the same on large scales as they do on small scales—are found in nature everywhere from snowflakes to broccoli to the beating of the heart. In a new study, researchers have demonstrated that metal wires patterned in various fractal motifs, when integrated into elastic materials, enable highly stretchable electronic devices. The fractal wire patterns could lead to a variety of new devices, such as biomedical sensors that can be attached to the skin and that have unique properties such as invisibility under magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Explore further Citation: Fractal wire patterns enhance stretchability of electronic devices (2014, February 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-02-fractal-wire-patterns-stretchability-electronic.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. This control provided by fractal patterns could allow researchers to tailor stretchable electronics devices for different applications, depending on the type of stretching required. One potential application is “epidermal electronics,” or skin-mounted sensors and actuators. A common example is electrodes, which measure electrophysiological processes in the brain, heart and muscle. To optimize the level of connectivity, the electrodes must conform to the skin, which has a stretchability of up to 20%. The researchers found that electrodes made with the Greek cross fractal pattern offer a high connectivity, stretchability, and robustness that enables them to compare favorably to conventional gel-based electrodes.Fractal patterns could also have applications for radio-frequency devices, which could enable electrodes that are compatible with MRI scans. The researchers performed MRI experiments comparing electrodes made from three types of fractal patterns, two variants of serpentine (non-fractal) patterns, a pattern consisting of superimposed vertical and horizontal lines, and no pattern. While the serpentine patterns and unpatterned samples contained shadows that distorted the images, the fractal samples showed no shadows or distortion. The researchers attribute this difference to the highly interconnected closed loops of metal in the serpentine patterns; in contrast, the fractals do not contain closed loops, so they do not couple to RF radiation and are therefore invisible under MRI. The results suggest that fractal patterns offer a promising route to future MRI-compatible skin-mounted or implanted electrodes and other electronic devices.In the future, the researchers plan to investigate further applications of fractals in electronics.”We are now exploiting these same ideas to move from electrodes and test structures of silicon, to active materials for stretchable LEDs and solar cells, with a next goal of producing full functional systems in these types of layouts,” Rogers said. (a) Fractal-inspired patterns for hard-soft materials integration, with (b) FEM images and (c) MicroXCT images. Credit: Fan, et al. ©2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited (Top) Image of metal wires with the Peano fractal pattern, with an overall geometry that spells out the characters in ‘ILLINOIS’, mounted on skin. Optical (lower left) and scanning electron (lower right) microscopy images of Peano-based wires on skin and a skin-replica (colorized metal wires), respectively, show how the wires conform to the substrate. Credit: Fan, et al. ©2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited More information: Jonathan A. Fan. “Fractal design concepts for stretchable electronics.” Nature Communications. DOI: 10.1038/ncomms4266 Journal information: Nature Communications Fractal plumage indicates bird fitness In their experiments, the researchers investigated several different fractal patterns, including Peano, Greek cross, Vicsek, and others. They found that these fractal patterns offer key advantages over other patterns, such as periodic loops and serpentine shapes investigated in previous studies. With the Peano pattern, for example, the researchers showed that modifying the orientation of the pattern enhances the material’s elastic strain in one or more selected directions, and allows the pattern to support different types of deformations. Previously explored wire patterns do not offer the ability to control the strain and deformation in these ways. © 2014 Phys.org. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Global roadmap for better understanding space weather released

first_img Explore further “Ongoing solar missions have given us guidance on optimal solar surface observations to support modeling so that improved estimates on the CME magnetic structure and energy content, as well as the propagation in the heliosphere can be achieved,” the researchers wrote in the report.The main goal is to obtain forecasts more than 12 hours ahead of the magnetic structure of incoming CMEs and their impact in geospace to improve alerts for geomagnetic disturbances.According to the report authors, ground- and space-based instrumentation should be increased to complement satellite data of the magnetospheric and ionospheric variability to cover gaps.The roadmap emphasizes the need for coordinated and complementary actions to better shield society from the effects of extreme solar activity. The scientists note that space weather is a real and permanent hazard to our civilizations that needs to be addressed by combining scientific research with engineering ingenuity. The problem should be perceived as still escalating, having in mind that with advancements in technology, society becomes more vulnerable to solar events.Conclusions from the report promise more accurate space weather forecasting and offer hope of future advancements in the understanding of the solar phenomena. The scientists predict that within the span of the next five to 10 years, we will see major progress regarding our comprehension of these space events and our ability to react to the sun’s violent lifecycle.The Committee on Space Research (COSPAR), established in 1958, is an interdisciplinary scientific body concerned with progress on an international scale of all kinds of scientific investigations carried out with space vehicles, rockets and balloons.The International Living With a Star (ILWS), established in 2002, is an international organization dedicated to the advancement of space weather science missions and research. Nation’s first operational satellite in deep space reaches final orbit (c) 2015 Phys.org The authors of the plan strongly emphasize that battling the effects of extreme solar activity is an international challenge. Changes in the sun’s magnetic field affect the whole planet, thus worldwide observations and substantial resources are needed to address the problem.Space weather impacts numerous aspects of our lives, including Earth’s climate, satellites, navigation systems, radio communications, and power grid. Severe space storms could result in perturbations in the electric power system and could cause loss of satellites. Therefore, extreme solar events could be catastrophic with severe consequences for millions of people.”Mitigating against the impacts of space weather can be improved by designing less susceptible, more resilient technologies, combined with better environmental knowledge and more reliable forecasts,” the report reads. “This roadmap outlines how we can achieve deeper understanding and better forecasts, recognizing that the expectations for space weather information differ between societal sectors, and that capabilities to observe or model space weather phenomena depend on available and anticipated technologies.”The scientists behind the roadmap recommend the extensive use of current spacecraft in service, which are designed to study the sun’s activity. The fleet of active space observatories includes NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Japanese Hinode, providing solar magnetic maps. Solar coronagraphy acquired by NASA/ESA SOHO spacecraft and NASA’s STEREO probes, is also essential for forecast purposes. Moreover, measurements of the solar-wind plasma and magnetic field delivered by NASA’s Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite and its successor, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) DSCOVR probe will bring crucial data as well.These observations made by numerous scientific spacecraft enable estimation of arrival times of the various solar events. For example, huge explosions of magnetic field and plasma from the sun’s corona, known as coronal mass ejections (CMEs), can reach Earth in as little as 14 to 17 hours. When CMEs impact the Earth’s magnetosphere, they are responsible for geomagnetic storms and enhanced aurorae. In order to predict the strength of the resulting geomagnetic storm, estimates of the magnetic field strength and direction are important. At the present time, the magnetic field cannot be determined until it is measured as the CME passes over a monitoring satellite. Citation: Global roadmap for better understanding space weather released (2015, July 6) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-07-global-roadmap-space-weather.htmlcenter_img More information: “Understanding space weather to shield society: A global road map for 2015–2025 commissioned by COSPAR and ILWS,” Advances in Space Research, Volume 55, Issue 12, 15 June 2015, Pages 2745-2807, ISSN 0273-1177, dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.asr.2015.03.023 (Phys.org)—The Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) and the International Living With a Star (ILWS) organization have released a global roadmap for 2015-2025 focusing on better understanding how the phenomena of space weather affect our daily activities on Earth. The strategic plan calls for a coordinated international approach to study the violent solar activity and showcases the research areas that need more attention in order to fully protect our planet from the effects of space weather. The roadmap was published on June 15 in the journal Advances in Space Research. Overview of the primary impacts and their societal sectors of space weather. The red shading in the background indicates the priority needs for the user communities behind each of the impacts, differentiated by time scale for forecast or for archival information as shown on the left. Text boxes identify the primary needed observations, archival measurements, and models to complete the impact chain, differentiated (using color, see legend) by solar, heliospheric, and geospace domains. Credit: Advances in Space Research, Volume 55, Issue 12, 15 June 2015, Pages 2745-2807, ISSN 0273-1177, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.asr.2015.03.023 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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