San Antonio Fosters Cybersecurity Cluster

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR San Antonio is cultivating the largest military and civilian federal cybersecurity hub outside the Washington metro region, marked by growth in the number of companies serving the market and highly-rated university programs, according to the San Antonio Economic Development Foundation.The military components of the city’s cybersecurity cluster are anchored by the 24th and 25th Air Force at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, and the National Security Agency Texas. The 24th Air Force safeguards key components of DOD’s information networks and employs more than 1,300 people. U.S. Cyber Command officials last year said up to 1,000 additional personnel will be coming to San Antonio in the next three years to support the department’s cybersecurity mission.“The strength of San Antonio’s cybersecurity industry is evident in the community’s commitment to grow and foster a sector for which it is ideally suited,” said John Dickson, principal at the San Antonio-based Denim Group. “Locally based companies are continuing to grow at a rate of 30 percent per year and innovative technologies are the result,” Dickson said.The city’s cybersecurity cluster is supported by more than 200 companies, including all major defense contractors and 100 local cybersecurity firms. San Antonio’s established military operations, along with academic programs at area universities, and talent and business incubators are helping the cybersecurity industry flourish in San Antonio.  “San Antonio is a breeding ground for cybersecurity resources, a place where technologies are being developed and enhanced to defend the nation, and a work force is being built to support the cybersecurity technology industry — the fastest growing area of advanced technology investment in the world,” said Mario Hernandez, president of the foundation.last_img read more

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Samsung has 9 Galaxy phones you can buy now Heres how to

first_img The most wallet-friendly The Galaxy S10 Plus has a big 6.4-inch AMOLED screen, loads of useful camera tools and one of the longest battery times we’ve tested on phones this year, lasting an excellent 21 hours during our lab test for continuous video playback on Airplane mode. Unlike the Galaxy S10, it has two front-facing cameras instead of just one. Samsung Galaxy Fold ($1,980) The cheapest S10 phone Read more about the Note 10 Tags Angela Lang/CNET The one with the stylus but bigger and with 5G Read the Galaxy A50 review Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Plus 5G ($1,300) Sarah Tew/CNET See at Amazon The Galaxy A50 is part of Samsung’s A-series, which is much cheaper than the top tier S-series of phones. At $350, £309 or AU$500, the A50 is one of your cheapest Galaxy options and features a 6.4-inch display, an in-screen fingerprint reader and a headphone jack. On the back are three cameras that include a wide-angle lens as well as a “depth lens,” which is used to take portrait shots with blurry, dramatic backgrounds. Samsung Galaxy S10 5G ($1,300) As the most wallet-friendly Galaxy S10 phone, the $750, £669 and AU$1,199 Galaxy S10E has a lot to offer. It’s a smaller phone, which is great for those looking for a comfortable grip, and it has a super-fast Snapdragon 855 chipset and a long-lasting battery life. Like other S10 phones, it can wirelessly charge other phones and accessories, like a pair of wireless earbuds or a smartwatch. Like all of Samsung’s Galaxy S10 phones, the standard Galaxy S10 is built from the best parts. It has a wonderfully sharp screen and a long battery life. Camera quality is awesome and it comes with all the extras, including the ability to wirelessly charge another device or accessory. See at Amazon See at Amazon The one that folds, obviously Andrew Hoyle/CNET The Note 10 Plus 5G is pretty much identical to the regular Note 10 Plus but like the S10 5G, it connects to 5G networks. Because of this, the phone weighs about 2 grams heavier and is more expensive than the Note 10 Plus by $200. It will be available on the US carriers Verizon, AT&T and T-Mobile, as well as in South Korea and other international markets, but it may not be worth investing in the phone just yet. See at Amazon Read the Galaxy S10 review Read more about the Galaxy Fold The Galaxy S10 5G is Samsung’s first phone that can connect to the next-gen network of high-speed mobile data known as 5G. Initially launched on the US carrier Verizon, the Galaxy S10 5G costs $1,300, £1,099 and AU$1,999, which has a 6.7-inch display, the same four-camera setup as the Note 10 Plus and a second depth-sensing front-facing camera. The device is also available on Sprint and T-Mobile, as well as AT&T but only for business. See at Verizon Samsung’s Note 10 in an array of different colors. Andrew Hoyle/CNET Samsung doesn’t care if you already think there’s a dizzying number of Galaxy phones to keep track of. On Aug. 7, the company added more to the pile when it unveiled three Note phones, the Note 10, Note 10 Plus and Note 10 Plus 5G, which are considered to be the upper “top-tier” end of the premium phone spectrum. They join six other Galaxy phones that Samsung announced this year, bringing the total number of new Galaxy phones you can buy to nine(!). As the most unique Galaxy phone, the Galaxy Fold has a secondary 4.6-inch display that serves as its “cover.” It then opens up like a book to a 7.3-inch tablet. The Fold also has six cameras: on the back, there’s the same triple-camera setup as the Galaxy S10 and on the front a single 10-megapixel camera. In tablet form, there are two additional cameras inside: a selfie camera and an 8-megapixel depth camera.Preorders began in April, but after reports of screen breakages, flickering and, bulging with preproduction units, Samsung has delayed the Fold until September. (For more information, read CNET’s Galaxy Fold FAQ.) Because of the phone’s novel design, the Fold is the most expensive phone of the bunch, costing $1,980 (about £1,500 or AU$2,800). Angela Lang/CNET Samsung Galaxy A50 ($350) Read the Galaxy S10 Plus review Read more about the Note 10 Plus 2:08 Mobile Phones Samsung Galaxy Note 10 ($949) The one with the stylus Now playing: Watch this: Angela Lang/CNET The flagship but bigger Samsung Galaxy S10 ($900) The ‘flagship’ Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Plus ($1,100) Share your voice Angela Lang/CNET The flagship but with 5G Comments Angela Lang/CNET See at Amazon The one with the stylus but bigger Angela Lang/CNET Samsung Galaxy S10E ($750) Angela Lang/CNET Read more about the Note 10 Plus 5G 22 Read the Galaxy S10E review From budget devices and 5G phones, to one in particular that can fold in half (yes, really), we round up the latest Galaxy phones, tell you what makes them special from all the others and order them from cheapest to most expensive.Note that these products are independently chosen by our editors. CNET may get a share of revenue from the sale of products from the links. See at Amazon See at AT&T Read more about the Galaxy S10 5G As the Galaxy phone with the biggest screen (that doesn’t fold, that is), the Note 10 Plus has a huge 6.8-inch display. Like its Note 10 counterpart, it has a single front-facing camera but in addition to its three rear cameras, it has a fourth depth-sensing camera. And while it doesn’t have a headphone jack either, it does have expandable memory, unlike the Note 10. See at Amazon Samsung Galaxy S10 Plus ($1,000) 9 Samsung Galaxy phones and how to tell them apart As the standard model of Samsung’s newest line of ultraluxe phones, the Note 10 features a 6.3-inch display, three rear cameras, an in-screen fingerprint scanner and a signature S Pen stylus that can remotely control the phone’s camera via Bluetooth. It also doesn’t have a headphone jack or expandable memory. Samsunglast_img read more

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BPRS DC Chapter of Black Journalists Host So You Think You Can

first_imgThe National Black Public Relations Society and the D.C. Chapter of Black Journalists will host a “So You Think You Can Pitch” event June 16 at Agency Chief, 1800 Massachusetts Avenue NW from 6:30 p.m. to 8: 30 p.m. Participants can learn tips and tricks for pitching media across different platforms. Panelists will include Jarvis Stewart, chairman and chief strategist, ir+media; Enid Doggett, CEO and founder, INSPRMedia; Anthony Dew, CEO, CD Media Communications; Barbara Holt Streetcar, CEO, MrsPRProtocol & Associates and Colin Campbell, senior D.C. correspondent at ARISE News. Edgar Brookins is the moderator for the event. Tickets cost $10. Purchase tickets at eventbrite.com/e/bprs-dc-presents-so-you-think-you-can-pitch-tickets-25498285057#tickets.last_img read more

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Top 5 cybersecurity trends you should be aware of in 2018

first_imgCybersecurity trends seem to be changing at an incredible rate. That poses new opportunities for criminals and new challenges for the professionals charged with securing our systems. High profile  attacks not only undermine trust in huge organizations, they also highlight a glaring gap in how we manage cybersecurity in a rapidly changing world. It also highlighted that attackers are adaptive and incredibly intelligent, evolving their techniques to adapt to new technologies and new behaviors. The big question is what the future will bring. What cybersecurity trends will impact the way cybersecurity experts work – and the way cybercriminals attack – for the rest of 2018 and beyond. Let’s explore some of the top cyber security trends and predictions of 2018: Artificial Intelligence and machine learning based cyber attacks and defenses AI and ML have started impacting major industries in various ways, but one of the most exciting applications is in cybersecurity. Basically, Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning algorithms can learn from past events in order to help predict and identify vulnerabilities within a software system. They can also be used to detect anomalies in behavior within a network. A report from Webroot claims that more than 90% of cybersecurity professionals use AI to improve their security skills. However, while AI and machine learning can help security professionals, it is also being used by cybercriminals too. It seems obvious: if cyber security pros can use AI to identify vulnerabilities, so can people that seek to exploit them. Expect this back and forth to continue throughout 2018 and beyond. Ransomware is spreading like fire Storing data on the cloud has many benefits, but it can be an easy target for cyber criminals. Ransomware is one such technique – criminals target a certain area of data and hold it to ransom. It’s already a high profile cyber security concern. Just look at WannaCry, Petya, Meltdown, and Spectre, some of the biggest cyber security attacks in 2017. The bigger players (Google, AWS, and Azure) of the cloud market are trying to make it difficult for attackers, but smaller cloud service providers end up paying customers for data breaches. The only way these attacks can be reduced is by performing regular back-ups, updating security patches, and strengthening real-time defenses. Complying with GDPR GDPR (General Data Protection) is an EU regulation that tightens up data protection and privacy for individuals within the European Union. The ruling includes mandatory rules that all companies will have to follow when processing and storing personal data. From 25 May, 2018, General Data Protection (GDPR) will come into effect where important changes will be implemented to the current data protection directive. To mention a few it will include increased territorial scope,stricter consent laws, elevated rights and more. According to Forrester report 80% companies will fail to comply with GDPR out of which 50% would choose not to, considering the cost of compliance. Penalties for non-compliance would reach upto €20m or 4% of worldwide annual turnover, whichever is greater. The rise of Cyberwar Taking current cybersecurity scenario into consideration, there are high possibilities 2018 will be the year of international conflict in cyberspace. This may include cyber crimes on government and financial systems or their infrastructure and utilities. Chances are cyber-terrorism groups will target sensitive areas like banks, press, government, law-enforcement and more similar areas. The Ashley Madison attack – which involved attackers threatening to release personal information about users if the site was not shut down – shows that ideological motivated attacks are often very targeted and sophisticated with the goal of data theft and extortion. The attack on Ashley Madison is testament to the fact that companies need to be doing more as attackers become more motivated. You should not be surprised to see cyber-attacks going beyond financial benefits. The coming year can witness cyber crimes which are politically motivated that is designed to acquire intelligence to benefit a particular political entity. These methods can also be used to target electronic voting system in order to control public opinion. These kind of sophisticated attacks are usually well-funded and lead to public chaos. Governments will need to take extensive checks to ensure their network and ecosystem is well protected. Such instances might lead to loss of right to remain anonymous on the web. Like everything else, this move will also have two sides of the coin. Attacking cyber currencies and blockchain systems Since Bitcoin and Blockchain were booming in the year 2017, it becomes a crucial target area for hackers. Chances are attackers may target smaller blockchain systems who opt for weaker cryptographic algorithms to increase performance. On the other hand, the possibility of cryptographic attack against Bitcoin can be minimum. The major worry here would about attacking a block with minimum security practices, but eventually that block could lead to larger blockchain system. One of the major advantage for attackers here is they don’t really need to know who the opposite partner is, as only a verified participant is authorised to execute the trade. Here, trust or risk plays an important part and that is blockchain’s sweet spot. For example: Receiving payments in government issued currencies have higher possibilities of getting caught but there is a higher probability of succeeding in cryptocurrency payments. Well, this may be the end of this article but is not an end to the way things might turn out to be in 2018. We still stand midway through another year and the war of cyberthreats rages. Don’t be surprised to hear something different or new as malicious hackers keep trying newer techniques and methodologies to destroy a system. Related links WPA3: Next-generation Wi-Fi security is here The 10 most common types of DoS attacks you need to know 12 common malware types you should knowlast_img read more

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