HTC details the impressive Vive Cosmos

first_img Up close with the HTC Vive Pro HTC $499 Mobile Mobile Accessories Gaming Accessories Gaming Video Games Virtual Reality Apps Mentioned Above HTC Vive The info follows HTC last week unveiling the look of the Vive Cosmos, which will come with a flip-up design, six cameras, detachable headphones, a faceplate and a vented front. Billed as a premium PC VR system, the Cosmos, first teased at CES 2019 in Las Vegas in January, will have “striking graphics [and] lifelike sound,” HTC said Friday.The company also touted its new tracking system. 1:47 Review • HTC Vive review: Yes, this is the best VR experience, if you’ve got the space “With wide and accurate tracking, gesture controls and a six-degrees-of-freedom (6DoF) headset and controller setup, Vive Cosmos promises a deeply engaging VR experience,” HTC said.The system can be used straight out of the box with minimal setup and also features a more comfortable headset with soft, light and breathable material, HTC said. The company also unveiled new Vive controllers that it called gamer-friendly, versatile and practical. Post a comment Now playing: Watch this: See It 0 Walmartcenter_img 9 Photos The Vive Cosmos display is 88% higher res than HTC’s original VR headset. HTC HTC has revealed a few more details about its upcoming Vive Cosmos, calling the virtual reality headset its “most impressive” yet. The Cosmos will enable VR at 90 frames per second, and a display with 88% higher resolution than the original HTC Vive.The LCD display will have a 2880×1700 combined resolution. It’ll also have real RGB panels and more subpixels for 40% improved lens clarity over its original VR headset.It also comes with a swappable faceplate, so you can update it with future versions. Still no word on when it will launch, or how much it will cost. CNET may get a commission from retail offers. HTC Vive Pro Eye tracks your eyes with pinpoint accuracy,… Share your voice $689 HTC Vive Preview • Here’s what it’s like to use the HTC Vive, the $799 VR headset that you can preorder today VR games you need to start playing right away Tags See it VR games on CNETlast_img read more

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Samsung has 9 Galaxy phones you can buy now Heres how to

first_img The most wallet-friendly The Galaxy S10 Plus has a big 6.4-inch AMOLED screen, loads of useful camera tools and one of the longest battery times we’ve tested on phones this year, lasting an excellent 21 hours during our lab test for continuous video playback on Airplane mode. Unlike the Galaxy S10, it has two front-facing cameras instead of just one. Samsung Galaxy Fold ($1,980) The cheapest S10 phone Read more about the Note 10 Tags Angela Lang/CNET The one with the stylus but bigger and with 5G Read the Galaxy A50 review Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Plus 5G ($1,300) Sarah Tew/CNET See at Amazon The Galaxy A50 is part of Samsung’s A-series, which is much cheaper than the top tier S-series of phones. At $350, £309 or AU$500, the A50 is one of your cheapest Galaxy options and features a 6.4-inch display, an in-screen fingerprint reader and a headphone jack. On the back are three cameras that include a wide-angle lens as well as a “depth lens,” which is used to take portrait shots with blurry, dramatic backgrounds. Samsung Galaxy S10 5G ($1,300) As the most wallet-friendly Galaxy S10 phone, the $750, £669 and AU$1,199 Galaxy S10E has a lot to offer. It’s a smaller phone, which is great for those looking for a comfortable grip, and it has a super-fast Snapdragon 855 chipset and a long-lasting battery life. Like other S10 phones, it can wirelessly charge other phones and accessories, like a pair of wireless earbuds or a smartwatch. Like all of Samsung’s Galaxy S10 phones, the standard Galaxy S10 is built from the best parts. It has a wonderfully sharp screen and a long battery life. Camera quality is awesome and it comes with all the extras, including the ability to wirelessly charge another device or accessory. See at Amazon See at Amazon The one that folds, obviously Andrew Hoyle/CNET The Note 10 Plus 5G is pretty much identical to the regular Note 10 Plus but like the S10 5G, it connects to 5G networks. Because of this, the phone weighs about 2 grams heavier and is more expensive than the Note 10 Plus by $200. It will be available on the US carriers Verizon, AT&T and T-Mobile, as well as in South Korea and other international markets, but it may not be worth investing in the phone just yet. See at Amazon Read the Galaxy S10 review Read more about the Galaxy Fold The Galaxy S10 5G is Samsung’s first phone that can connect to the next-gen network of high-speed mobile data known as 5G. Initially launched on the US carrier Verizon, the Galaxy S10 5G costs $1,300, £1,099 and AU$1,999, which has a 6.7-inch display, the same four-camera setup as the Note 10 Plus and a second depth-sensing front-facing camera. The device is also available on Sprint and T-Mobile, as well as AT&T but only for business. See at Verizon Samsung’s Note 10 in an array of different colors. Andrew Hoyle/CNET Samsung doesn’t care if you already think there’s a dizzying number of Galaxy phones to keep track of. On Aug. 7, the company added more to the pile when it unveiled three Note phones, the Note 10, Note 10 Plus and Note 10 Plus 5G, which are considered to be the upper “top-tier” end of the premium phone spectrum. They join six other Galaxy phones that Samsung announced this year, bringing the total number of new Galaxy phones you can buy to nine(!). As the most unique Galaxy phone, the Galaxy Fold has a secondary 4.6-inch display that serves as its “cover.” It then opens up like a book to a 7.3-inch tablet. The Fold also has six cameras: on the back, there’s the same triple-camera setup as the Galaxy S10 and on the front a single 10-megapixel camera. In tablet form, there are two additional cameras inside: a selfie camera and an 8-megapixel depth camera.Preorders began in April, but after reports of screen breakages, flickering and, bulging with preproduction units, Samsung has delayed the Fold until September. (For more information, read CNET’s Galaxy Fold FAQ.) Because of the phone’s novel design, the Fold is the most expensive phone of the bunch, costing $1,980 (about £1,500 or AU$2,800). Angela Lang/CNET Samsung Galaxy A50 ($350) Read the Galaxy S10 Plus review Read more about the Note 10 Plus 2:08 Mobile Phones Samsung Galaxy Note 10 ($949) The one with the stylus Now playing: Watch this: Angela Lang/CNET The flagship but bigger Samsung Galaxy S10 ($900) The ‘flagship’ Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Plus ($1,100) Share your voice Angela Lang/CNET The flagship but with 5G Comments Angela Lang/CNET See at Amazon The one with the stylus but bigger Angela Lang/CNET Samsung Galaxy S10E ($750) Angela Lang/CNET Read more about the Note 10 Plus 5G 22 Read the Galaxy S10E review From budget devices and 5G phones, to one in particular that can fold in half (yes, really), we round up the latest Galaxy phones, tell you what makes them special from all the others and order them from cheapest to most expensive.Note that these products are independently chosen by our editors. CNET may get a share of revenue from the sale of products from the links. See at Amazon See at AT&T Read more about the Galaxy S10 5G As the Galaxy phone with the biggest screen (that doesn’t fold, that is), the Note 10 Plus has a huge 6.8-inch display. Like its Note 10 counterpart, it has a single front-facing camera but in addition to its three rear cameras, it has a fourth depth-sensing camera. And while it doesn’t have a headphone jack either, it does have expandable memory, unlike the Note 10. See at Amazon Samsung Galaxy S10 Plus ($1,000) 9 Samsung Galaxy phones and how to tell them apart As the standard model of Samsung’s newest line of ultraluxe phones, the Note 10 features a 6.3-inch display, three rear cameras, an in-screen fingerprint scanner and a signature S Pen stylus that can remotely control the phone’s camera via Bluetooth. It also doesn’t have a headphone jack or expandable memory. Samsunglast_img read more

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Sun Pharma Shares Plunge over 15 on Profit Warning

first_imgStock prices of India’s biggest drug-maker Sun Pharma fell sharply on Tuesday as the company said its profit could come under pressure due to costs involved in merging of Ranbaxy Laboratories.Share prices of Sun Pharma fell by ₹143.30 or 15.14% to close at ₹803.50 on the Bombay Stock Exchange (BSE).On Monday, the Mumbai-based multi-national pharmaceutical company said its revenue growth will remain flat in the current fiscal year owing to factors including expenditure on integrating Ranbaxy into the company, extended impact of “remediation measures” at Halol and sale of low-margin businesses.However, brokerages remain mixed over the outlook for stock prices of Sun Pharma despite a warning for a slump in profit.”The miss, in our view, is largely due to one-off issues (Halol disruptions and integration costs) and are non-recurring. With business fundamentals remaining intact, our FY17 number sees only marginal downgrade and we retain our buy rating with a target price of Rs 1,100,” global brokerage firm Jefferies said in a note to The Economic Times.Sun Pharma had witnessed a fall in profit by 44% to ₹888 crore during January-March quarter against ₹1,587 crore in the same quarter last year.”Things seemed to be getting murkier for the company and it is likely to be under stress not only for the current financial year but also FY16-17,” BSE & NSE member Dipan Mehta, told moneycontrol.com.Nevertheless, the management of Sun Pharma remains hopeful of making comeback to a “sustainable growth path” starting from next fiscal year once the hurdles clear off.The Sun-Ranbaxy merger was expected to be a complicated process, considering the large size of the two companies. Combined sales force of the two firms is nearly 30,000.”We continue to believe that these issues pressuring near-term earnings do not impact the medium-to-long-term outlook of Sun and hence would look to add on any disproportionate declines,” said the Macquarie report.last_img read more

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Study provides surprisingly complex portrait of ancient trade networks

first_img Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further More information: Compositional data supports decentralized model of production and circulation of artifacts in the pre-Columbian south-central Andes. PNAS 2017 114 (20) E3917-E3926; published ahead of print May 1, 2017, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1610494114AbstractThe circulation and exchange of goods and resources at various scales have long been considered central to the understanding of complex societies, and the Andes have provided a fertile ground for investigating this process. However, long-standing archaeological emphasis on typological analysis, although helpful to hypothesize the direction of contacts, has left important aspects of ancient exchange open to speculation. To improve understanding of ancient exchange practices and their potential role in structuring alliances, we examine material exchanges in northwest Argentina (part of the south-central Andes) during 400 BC to AD 1000 (part of the regional Formative Period), with a multianalytical approach (petrography, instrumental neutron activation analysis, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) to artifacts previously studied separately. We assess the standard centralized model of interaction vs. a decentralized model through the largest provenance database available to date in the region. The results show: (i) intervalley heterogeneity of clays and fabrics for ordinary wares; (ii) intervalley homogeneity of clays and fabrics for a wide range of decorated wares (e.g., painted Ciénaga); (iii) selective circulation of two distinct polychrome wares (Vaquerías and Condorhuasi); (iv) generalized access to obsidian from one major source and various minor sources; and (v) selective circulation of volcanic rock tools from a single source. These trends reflect the multiple and conflicting demands experienced by people in small-scale societies, which may be difficult to capitalize by aspiring elites. The study undermines centralized narratives of exchange for this period, offering a new platform for understanding ancient exchange based on actual material transfers, both in the Andes and beyond. The study challenges existing centralized network models of interaction in favor of a decentralized network structure. The researchers built the largest provenance database ever constructed for the region, taking a multianalytical approach that considered lithic sources, pottery analysis, and comparisons of clays and fabrics. These materials and artifacts had previously only been studied separately. The wide-ranging collection of data resulted in a complex, sprawling portrait of northwest Argentina during the Formative Period.This era was characterized by the slow development of sedentary societies with subsistence and crafting technologies. In older studies, researchers reconstructed regional networks based on typological similarities between materials and artifacts. The new study attempts to investigate interactions between both local and regional networks in the Andes during this period by comparing the manufacture and sources of materials, as opposed only to looking at styles.For instance, an examination of obsidian artifacts demonstrated that they shared a common source. But the differences between the cultural styles and assemblages demonstrated that many groups from different communities and cultures shared access to the same source. This allowed the researchers to create a regional network representing the movement and propagation of this source of rock.The petrography analysis of ceramics sources revealed a variety of technical production modes. The researchers found distinct chemical fingerprints for ceramic artifacts found in specific valleys and areas. “This pattern strongly suggests that there was a set of middle-range distance connections involving not only the circulation of raw materials and artifacts, but also the transmission of skills and concepts of manufacture and design that were not exclusionary,” the authors note.Notably, the study did not find characteristic artifacts from the Ambato Valley—these are distinctive gray-black wares found in past archaeological excavations that did not seem to spread among the regions encompassed by the current study. This calls into question the presumed centrality of the Ambato Valley as a node within the regional trade network. “Together with the observed low frequency of painted Aguado varieties in our core study area, the results of the geochemical analysis support a reconsideration of the purported central role of this valley,” the researchers write.The study concludes that the area supported many circulation networks involving multiple means of transport, including the presumed use of llamas. Additionally, local networks of different types were incorporated into larger regional networks that best served the needs of communities during that period–needs that were not necessarily dictated by either socio-political considerations or the desires of cultural elites. “Focusing on close intercommunity links rooted on common craft practices rather than solely on stylistic reconstructions is a more fruitful avenue to explore the ancient circulation of goods, skills, and people without assuming the capacity of early elites to manipulate and capitalize on such networks,” the authors conclude. © 2017 Phys.orgcenter_img (Phys.org)—The study of ancient civilizations, particularly those that did not leave extensive writing in the archaeological record, is reliant on the evidence of other kinds of material artifacts. And one of the keys to understanding large, complex societies is mapping the circulation of such artifacts. An international research collaborative recently published a study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on the production and circulation of artifacts in the south-central Andes during 400 BC to 1000 AD. Albania stops smugglers of 230 ancient Apollonia artifacts Distribution routes for obsidian sources, decorated MG2 and MG7 pottery wares, Vaquerías and Condorhuasi wares, and type 1 vulcanite. Credit: (c) PNAS 2017 114 (20) E3917-E3926; published ahead of print May 1, 2017, doi:10.1073/pnas.1610494114 Citation: Study provides surprisingly complex portrait of ancient trade networks (2017, May 23) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-05-surprisingly-complex-portrait-ancient-networks.htmllast_img read more

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WBCS cadre sees reshuffle

first_imgKolkata: In a reshuffle in the WBCS (Executive) cadre, 18 SDOs have been changed.SDOs of Barasat, Suri, Bankura (Sadar), Darjeeling (Sadar), Barrackpore, Egra, Mekhliganj, Mathabhanga, Kakdwip, Raiganj, Ranaghat, Tufanganj, Cooch Behar (Sadar), Alipore, Howrah (Sadar), Jhalda, Purulia (Sadar) and Alipurduar were changed.Avik Chatterjee, who was SDO Darjeeling (Sadar), has become the Deputy Secretary of Self Help Groups and Self Employment department. Thendhup Namgyal Sherpa has become the Deputy Director of Tourism Directorate. He was SDO Raiganj. Reshma Banerjee, who was SDO Howrah (Sadar), has been posted as advisor of WBIDC. Arundhuti De has become the Secretary of Alipurduar Zilla Parishad. Santi Kumar Batabyal, who was posted as Deputy Secretary of the Land and Land Reforms department, has become the Deputy Secretary of the Judicial department.last_img read more

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