Wilmington Commuter Rail Riders To See 50 Cent Increase In Fares Beginning

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — The MBTA is raising fares for Wilmington commuter rail riders beginning Monday, July 1, 2019.A one-way fare from Wilmington station on the Lowell Line and North Wilmington station on the Haverhill Line into North Station will now cost $8.00, an increase of $0.50 from the current $7.50.A monthly commuter rail pass for Zone 3 — which includes both Wilmington station and North Wilmington — will now cost $261.00, an increase of $16.75 from the current $244.25.These increases are part of a much broader MBTA fare increase on subway, commuter rail, certain buses, ferries, and the RIDE Program statewide.“State law allows the MBTA to raise fares at regular, modest increments, limiting increases to once every 2 years and a cap of no more than 7% for each increase,” reads an announcement from the MBTA. “The Fiscal and Management Control Board approved the proposal, with some modifications, resulting in an increase of an average of 5.8% across all fares.”Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE.  Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedMBTA Adds Extra Late-Night Commuter Rail Trains For This Weekend’s Lowell Folk FestivalIn “Government”Lowell Line Weekend Commuter Rail Service To Be Replaced By Bus Shuttle For 3 Weekends Beginning May 12In “Government”SELECTMEN NEWS: Town Comes Up With Fix For North Wilmington Commuter Rail StationIn “Government”last_img read more

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Former Assistant Superintendent for Special Ed Could Return to HISD

first_img X HISDFormer HISD Assistant Superintendent Sowmya Kumar resigned amid reports of denial of services for children with disabilities.In March, HISD’s assistant superintendent for special education resigned because of reports children with special needs were denied services.But the door is open for her return, as Houston Public Media has uncovered.When HISD administrator Sowmya Kumar was pressured to leave her post over special education, she and the school district negotiated her departure.Houston Public Media obtained a copy of that agreement. It shows that Kumar, who had a six-figure salary, got paid for the rest of the school year and agreed not to sue the district. It also states that Kumar is eligible to work at HISD again as an employee or consultant, as early as September 2017.“This is a benefit that was negotiated for this administrator that well up into 99 percent of the other employees who leave under these types of clouds, if you will, don’t get,” said Chris Tritico, a legal analyst.Tritico has worked on settlements like this for other educators and said that he doesn’t see this very often.“It is a rare occasion that when you have someone with this much public scrutiny and this high-profile situation, that you get a settlement agreement that says they’re almost immediately eligible for rehire,” he explained.When Kumar resigned, there was growing scrutiny over families struggling to get services for their children with disabilities.There’s also an ongoing federal investigation into a statewide policy that has discouraged schools from providing special ed services for over a decade.  That federal report is expected this summer. Share 00:00 /01:20 Listen To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code:last_img read more

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DC Fair Aims to Help Adult Learners

first_imgThe third-annual Adult College Completion Fair, dubbed “Revisiting the Dream: College Access and Completion for All,” will be held 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. April 1 at One Judiciary Square, 441 Fourth Street NW. The Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE) is organizing the fair. Officials of the agency said they are expecting about 500 people to attend.The focus of the fair will be on budgeting and financing an education. As such, the fair will offer college advising, career assistance and workshops on financial aid and navigating the college admissions process as a new or returning student. “We just want our adult learners to be empowered and to be knowledgeable,” said Tiffany DeJesus, program manager for college and career readiness postsecondary education, with OSSE.Attendees will have an opportunity to visit representatives from nearly a dozen colleges and universities that focus on adult learners. They include Prince George’s Community College, George Mason University, University of the District of Columbia, and Georgetown University’s School of Continuing Studies.Adult learners can also get advice from local groups specializing in postsecondary resources, the federal student aid process, tuition assistance, and in preparing them for community college. Limited information on masters’ degree programs will be available as well.By 2020, 76 percent of all jobs in the District will require post-secondary education, according to the Georgetown University Center on Education. That statistic, DeJesus indicated, is driving the fair.A survey DeJesus conducted with about 400 District residents found 80 percent of them had some college credit, but had not finish their degrees. Most of those adults were D.C. tuition assistance grantees who failed to complete the application process for the grants, she said.For Reginald Black, it’s personal. He has served on the Adult College Completion Initiative since its inception, joining when he was a college/career navigator at Academy of Hope Public Adult Charter School. Two years ago, Black pushed the D.C. City Council to fund adult learners, and was floored when he a city council member told him 65,000 adults living in the District don’t have high school diplomas.“I said to myself, ‘Wow, it’s crazy to me that there are so many people living in the nation’s capital who don’t have a high school diploma,’ and so the question becomes ‘How do you support yourself?’” Black asked.Since then, Black, now a recruiter at Trinity Washington University’s graduate school of business, has made it his priority to support the fair. “It doesn’t matter what I do in my occupation,” he said. “I’ll be there to make sure the fair goes off with a bang.” According to the American Community Survey, 100,268 District residents’ highest level of educational attainment is a high school diploma or equivalent.Adults can run into several obstacles that keep them from completing their degree, DeJesus said. Issues range from the inability to afford school, to work-life balance issues, to working longer hours so they can keep living in the District as it gentrifies.Affordability is a key issue, she said. Sometimes adults register to attend for-profit universities thinking they’re a “quick fix” but those institutions may not have been accredited — meaning their credits won’t transfer — and are often expensive.Some adults pursue an education and take out loans they are unable to pay back. If students are unable to finish paying for their education, the learning institution typically holds the transcript or refuses to transfer credits to another school, DeJesus said. “It’s more than just being in debt with federal student aid,” DeJesus said. “It’s more so having the balance so they’re able to pay.”Many adult learners need flexibility in programming, such as night or weekend courses, or the ability to take one-to-two classes at a time so they can work and/or look after their children. Supporting these learners now will strengthen the local economy and workforce in the future, DeJesus said.last_img read more

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Birthday Dollars to Fund Faith Fellows

first_imgOffer expertise as electricians, plumbers, builders, renovation experts, etc. Email cdc@pleasanthope.org to volunteer individual or group labor. By Rev. Dorothy S. Boulware, Special to the AFROThe Rev. Heber Brown III is using his birthday capital on social media to provide experience for young people interested in Pleasant Hope Baptist Church’s brand of urban ministry. During a tenure that has spanned almost 11 years, Rev. Brown has expanded the reach of his church from providing gospel lessons in the words of the master, to gospel lessons in providing affordable, healthy eating through church farming, to gospel lessons in educating children in their own African-American history, to providing gospel lessons in being good citizens on earth.With all that brewing, Pleasant Hope is currently renovating one of its properties to house four young adults who want a taste of real ministry to incorporate into their collective of learning to assimilate into their own ministries when the time is right. Known for his whole-hearted involvement in the totality of life from education to politics, from activism to demanding justice,  Dr. Brown is the person for such an experience.Rev. Dr. Heber Brown III at the family land of 5th generation African-American cotton farmer, Julius Tillery in Garysburg, N.C. (Courtesy Photos)And that’s why he recently asked his FaceBook friends to contribute to that renovation for the Young Adult Residential Fellowship Program rather than to trinkets for his birthday.“I’m so excited for these young people to walk their vision while learning ministry and discovering their own gifts and abilities,” Rev. Brown said. “We’re meeting their concerns around basic needs so they can focus fully on their development.”And the entire congregation has the same focus, thanks to the Christian Education Department that provides the basic teaching; thanks to the preaching and total reinforcement from all areas.“Our intention is to provide great synergy through preaching and teaching that sensitizes our members to the incarnation of the gospel…doing as we see Jesus do in his ministry,” Rev. Brown said.“This also incorporates the use of graphics, our bulletins and newsletter, sending one message so we’re in total agreement.”And so that everyone can be involved in their own unique way.“We provide many on ramps so the non builder can still support the building ministry and the non gardener can still support the gardening ministry.”Dr. Heber Brown, III pauses for a picture after providing the keynote message at the Virginia Farm To Table Conference. (Courtesy Photo) This pastor, teacher, innovator is not waiting for old age to institutionalize the work he’s begun. “Our prayer is to attract five star administrators, event planners, to cast vision for big dreams that evolve as the day to day work gets done and goes off right and well,” the sought-after teacher, preacher said.His ministry also attracts great volunteers. That’s how Pleasant Hope operates its Orita Cross Freedom School whenever public schools are closed. Modeled after the freedom schools of the 60s, this one is also the product of many partnerships.“We are so blessed by the many people who resonate in various ways with the work we’re doing. We started with a core group of mothers who needed support for raising their children, so they worked together to support all the children,” Rev. Brown said.“And became a super resource.”This is how each of their principal ministries began, with the recognition of a need.“Pleasant Hope Garden. The Freedom School. The Black Church Food Network. Each began with a core team, expanded with the development of leadership around each area; we put resources to it and then cast vision,” he said. “Sometimes there’s an overlap, but each team is squarely focused on its own area.”Now his vision is being cast well beyond the walls of Pleasant Hope.“I’m speaking in Dayton and Columbus, Ohio. I’m headed to the Tidewater area next month and also doing some work in Jackson, Mississippi.”He’s also adamant that church work their chosen project as a member of a church team or cluster. “Ministry is too hard to do alone. Team work makes it easier and prevents reinventing the wheel,” Rev. Brown said.“Churches have resources. They have houses, land, buses. The question is how we can be better stewards with what God has already given us.”People can help in a number of ways:CashApp $HeberBrownIII. PayPal.me/HeberBrown. Givelify: https://giv.li/buy5r3center_img Pray.last_img read more

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