Samsung has 9 Galaxy phones you can buy now Heres how to

first_img The most wallet-friendly The Galaxy S10 Plus has a big 6.4-inch AMOLED screen, loads of useful camera tools and one of the longest battery times we’ve tested on phones this year, lasting an excellent 21 hours during our lab test for continuous video playback on Airplane mode. Unlike the Galaxy S10, it has two front-facing cameras instead of just one. Samsung Galaxy Fold ($1,980) The cheapest S10 phone Read more about the Note 10 Tags Angela Lang/CNET The one with the stylus but bigger and with 5G Read the Galaxy A50 review Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Plus 5G ($1,300) Sarah Tew/CNET See at Amazon The Galaxy A50 is part of Samsung’s A-series, which is much cheaper than the top tier S-series of phones. At $350, £309 or AU$500, the A50 is one of your cheapest Galaxy options and features a 6.4-inch display, an in-screen fingerprint reader and a headphone jack. On the back are three cameras that include a wide-angle lens as well as a “depth lens,” which is used to take portrait shots with blurry, dramatic backgrounds. Samsung Galaxy S10 5G ($1,300) As the most wallet-friendly Galaxy S10 phone, the $750, £669 and AU$1,199 Galaxy S10E has a lot to offer. It’s a smaller phone, which is great for those looking for a comfortable grip, and it has a super-fast Snapdragon 855 chipset and a long-lasting battery life. Like other S10 phones, it can wirelessly charge other phones and accessories, like a pair of wireless earbuds or a smartwatch. Like all of Samsung’s Galaxy S10 phones, the standard Galaxy S10 is built from the best parts. It has a wonderfully sharp screen and a long battery life. Camera quality is awesome and it comes with all the extras, including the ability to wirelessly charge another device or accessory. See at Amazon See at Amazon The one that folds, obviously Andrew Hoyle/CNET The Note 10 Plus 5G is pretty much identical to the regular Note 10 Plus but like the S10 5G, it connects to 5G networks. Because of this, the phone weighs about 2 grams heavier and is more expensive than the Note 10 Plus by $200. It will be available on the US carriers Verizon, AT&T and T-Mobile, as well as in South Korea and other international markets, but it may not be worth investing in the phone just yet. See at Amazon Read the Galaxy S10 review Read more about the Galaxy Fold The Galaxy S10 5G is Samsung’s first phone that can connect to the next-gen network of high-speed mobile data known as 5G. Initially launched on the US carrier Verizon, the Galaxy S10 5G costs $1,300, £1,099 and AU$1,999, which has a 6.7-inch display, the same four-camera setup as the Note 10 Plus and a second depth-sensing front-facing camera. The device is also available on Sprint and T-Mobile, as well as AT&T but only for business. See at Verizon Samsung’s Note 10 in an array of different colors. Andrew Hoyle/CNET Samsung doesn’t care if you already think there’s a dizzying number of Galaxy phones to keep track of. On Aug. 7, the company added more to the pile when it unveiled three Note phones, the Note 10, Note 10 Plus and Note 10 Plus 5G, which are considered to be the upper “top-tier” end of the premium phone spectrum. They join six other Galaxy phones that Samsung announced this year, bringing the total number of new Galaxy phones you can buy to nine(!). As the most unique Galaxy phone, the Galaxy Fold has a secondary 4.6-inch display that serves as its “cover.” It then opens up like a book to a 7.3-inch tablet. The Fold also has six cameras: on the back, there’s the same triple-camera setup as the Galaxy S10 and on the front a single 10-megapixel camera. In tablet form, there are two additional cameras inside: a selfie camera and an 8-megapixel depth camera.Preorders began in April, but after reports of screen breakages, flickering and, bulging with preproduction units, Samsung has delayed the Fold until September. (For more information, read CNET’s Galaxy Fold FAQ.) Because of the phone’s novel design, the Fold is the most expensive phone of the bunch, costing $1,980 (about £1,500 or AU$2,800). Angela Lang/CNET Samsung Galaxy A50 ($350) Read the Galaxy S10 Plus review Read more about the Note 10 Plus 2:08 Mobile Phones Samsung Galaxy Note 10 ($949) The one with the stylus Now playing: Watch this: Angela Lang/CNET The flagship but bigger Samsung Galaxy S10 ($900) The ‘flagship’ Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Plus ($1,100) Share your voice Angela Lang/CNET The flagship but with 5G Comments Angela Lang/CNET See at Amazon The one with the stylus but bigger Angela Lang/CNET Samsung Galaxy S10E ($750) Angela Lang/CNET Read more about the Note 10 Plus 5G 22 Read the Galaxy S10E review From budget devices and 5G phones, to one in particular that can fold in half (yes, really), we round up the latest Galaxy phones, tell you what makes them special from all the others and order them from cheapest to most expensive.Note that these products are independently chosen by our editors. CNET may get a share of revenue from the sale of products from the links. See at Amazon See at AT&T Read more about the Galaxy S10 5G As the Galaxy phone with the biggest screen (that doesn’t fold, that is), the Note 10 Plus has a huge 6.8-inch display. Like its Note 10 counterpart, it has a single front-facing camera but in addition to its three rear cameras, it has a fourth depth-sensing camera. And while it doesn’t have a headphone jack either, it does have expandable memory, unlike the Note 10. See at Amazon Samsung Galaxy S10 Plus ($1,000) 9 Samsung Galaxy phones and how to tell them apart As the standard model of Samsung’s newest line of ultraluxe phones, the Note 10 features a 6.3-inch display, three rear cameras, an in-screen fingerprint scanner and a signature S Pen stylus that can remotely control the phone’s camera via Bluetooth. It also doesn’t have a headphone jack or expandable memory. Samsunglast_img read more

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Samsung Galaxy A70 features revealed ahead of launch Top facts

first_imgWorld’s leading smartphone-maker Samsung is slated to unveil new Galaxy A series mobiles on April 10 and to drum up excitement among fans ahead of the launch, has revealed key features of the Galaxy A70.The upcoming Galaxy A70 is said to come with Infinity-U design language having a massive 6.7-inch edge-to-edge display with 20:9 aspect ratio and also boast in-screen fingerprint sensor similar to the recently unveiled flagship Galaxy S10 series.It will be made available in four vivid colour options such as Cora, Blue, Black and White and the shell on the back, will come with a stylish prism effect that reveals stunning gradient colours depending on light direction and reflections. Samsung Galaxy A70 is slated to make its global debut along with the Galaxy A60 and the Galaxy A90 on April 10.Samsung India Media KitAs far as the imaging is concerned, the new Samsung phone is said to house triple camera module, one 32MP primary, depth lens sensors and 8MP ultra-wide lens. With such hardware, the Galaxy A70 will be able to offer spectacular Bokeh effects and also be able to crisp images in low light conditions. It also boasts Scene Optimizer that can recognize and intuitively enhance up to 20 scenes, bringing out the best in what it sees. And with Flaw Detection that automatically identifies glitches before the user clicks so that he/she never miss the perfect shot.Even on the front, it will come with an impressive 32MP shooter with a wider lens so that it covers more area to capture more people in a group selfie frame. Samsung Galaxy S10 series is now available in India.Samsung Mobile PressThe Galaxy A70 will come with a huge 4,500mAh battery, which is more than enough to keep the phone running for more than a day easily under mixed usage. It will be powered by Samsung’s new Android Pie-based One UI similar to the marquee phones.For now, there is no word on the processor, but it looks like Samsung wants to keep some information including price in suspense to keep the fans curious and eagerly wait for the launch day. Samsung is hosting the Galaxy Event in three continents simultaneously on April 10 and we expect India, will also be part of the company’s plans.Besides the Galaxy A70, Samsung is reported to be launching two new phones Galaxy A60 and the top-end among the lot, the Galaxy A90 early next month.Stay tuned. Follow us @IBTimesIN_Tech on Twitter and on Google News for the latest updates on Samsung. IBTimes VideoRelated VideosMore videos Play VideoPauseMute0:07/0:40Loaded: 0%0:07Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE-0:33?Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedSubtitlessubtitles settings, opens subtitles settings dialogsubtitles off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window. COPY LINKAD Loading … Closecenter_img Apple and Samsung Finally Reach A Trucelast_img read more

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When Russ premiered Rishi Jains Billionaire Bracelet in his I See You

first_imgRishi Jain and RussPR HandoutCelebrity jeweler Rishi Jain’s fine artistic work is not just liked by Bollywood people, but also recognised by western celebrities. Even Russ premiered Rishi Jain’s Billionaire Bracelet in his I See You Tour Part 2.Rishi Jain has established himself as one of the most popular and trusted artists and celebrity jeweller in India. In the last decade, He has carved a niche for himself and now people in Bollywood recognise him as Jain the Jeweler. He is in good terms with several celebs like Sanjay Dutt and Chirag Malhotra and others who also follow him on social media. Rishi Jain has over 139,000 followers on Instagram.Rishi is unstoppable as his popularity grows beyond Bollywood and India. There is also western celebrity drip scene with his exclusive bust down custom pieces.  From the West, Rishi also recently collaborated with the trending, multi-platinum artist Russ with his custom made designed piece; “The Billionaire Bracelet”. Russ was so satisfied with the quality and professionalism of Indian Jeweler Rishi Jain’s workmanship that he premiered the bracelet at a performance in his hometown of Atlanta, GA on his I See You Tour Part 2 on October 24, 2018.Rishi Jain’s popularity and reach are not only growing in India but his bust down jewellery is being even recognised in western countries. Now he is holding an office in Mumbai, the heart of Bollywood, and he is planning to establish more offices across India. Rishi wants to work with more top names of India and wants to be the biggest and the most recognised Indian Jeweller of all time.last_img read more

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Girls Are More Engaged When Theyre Doing Science Rather Than Being Scientists

first_imgAsking young girls to “do science” leads them to show greater persistence in science activities than does asking them to “be scientists,” researchers at New York University and Princeton University find. The study results are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. Rhodes and her coauthors, who include Princeton’s Sarah-Jane Leslie, note that the messaging children often receive through television shows centers on identity rather than action when it comes to science. Additional coauthors on the work include Kathryn Yee, a researcher in NYU’s Department of Psychology at the time of the study, and Katya Saunders, a postdoctoral researcher in NYU’s Department of Psychology. “Describing science as actions, by saying ‘let’s do science,’ leads to more science engagement than does describing science in terms of identities, by asking them to ‘be scientists,’” explains Marjorie Rhodes, an associate professor in NYU’s Department of Psychology and the senior author of the study. These findings suggest that efforts encouraging girls to enter science—a field in which they are underrepresented—might benefit from focusing on describing the activity of doing science rather than on encouraging children to adopt scientist identities, at least in early childhood. “The roots of gender disparities in science achievement take hold in early childhood,” Rhodes observes. “This research identifies an element of children’s environments that could be targeted to reduce early gender differences in science behavior among young children.” This research was supported, in part, by a grant from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development of the National Institutes of Health (R01HD087672). Notably, girls who were initially asked to “do science” showed more persistence on the subsequent science game than did girls who had been asked to “be scientists.”center_img “These effects particularly hold for children who are the target of stereotypes suggesting that they might not be the kind of person who succeeds in science—in this case, girls,” she adds. Children were then asked to complete a new science game designed to illustrate the scientific method. Persistence was measured by how long they continued to play this game. By contrast, the effects of language for boys were more variable. For instance, one of their studies found that boys younger than 5 years old showed greater persistence when language was action-oriented while those older than 5 revealed higher levels of persistence when language was identity-oriented. In the newly published Psychological Science work, the researchers conducted four studies with children aged 4 to 9 years old. Here, the children received an introduction to science that described science as an identity (“Let’s be scientists! Scientists explore the world and discover new things!”) or as action (“Let’s do science! Doing science means exploring the world and discovering new things!”). Overall, these findings suggest that identity-focused language can undermine persistence in some children as they acquire new skills, particularly when cultural stereotypes lead children to question if they hold the relevant identity.  All data, materials, and analytic code are publicly available via the Open Science Framework. This article has received the badges for Open Data and Open Materials.last_img read more

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